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CALCULATING AND ACCOUNTING
FOR THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION
PRESENTING:
DUNCAN CHAPPLE, EDINBURGH
& KATY MASON, LANCASTER.
COA...
Ordering the perfect storm
• Intermediaries play a vital role in the creation of futures
• But what work is done in their ...
Why framings matter: An example of a Gartner, Inc. Hype Cycle
Widely used to align
ideas about the future
• Enduring
‘furn...
Accounting for the future of innovation
• The different roles of analysts in influencing the field
• How power is unevenly...
INTERMEDIARIES AS
CATALYSTS OF MARKETS
- WHERE MARKET ACTORS COLLIDE
- WHERE THEY CONTEST AND IMAGINE NEW
VERSIONS OF WHAT...
o HOWELLS, 2006
- TYPES AND FUNCTIONS
- WHAT BUNDLES OF PRACTICES
EXIST
- WHAT DO THEY TRY TO
ACHIEVE
o BESSY AND CHAUVIN,...
Christian Bessy and Pierre-Marie Chauvin
Valuation Studies 1(1) 2013: 83–117
• “We show how intermediaries contribute
to d...
Methods
• Searches on ‘Cool Vendor’ documentation
• Reviewed several Hype Cycles, initially in the area of
health, to iden...
What we looked for
1.
Function to
influence
the field or
mobilize
the market
2.
Category
construction
practices
3.
Comment...
Indicative findings
# Function Category Quotes and notes
13 Knowledge
combination
and re-
generation
framing They talk to ...
Discussion
• Bessy and Chauvin show a clear division of labour: intermediaries produce frames; market
participants consume...
CALCULATING AND
ACCOUNTING FOR THE
FUTURE OF INNOVATION
PRESENTING:
DUNCAN CHAPPLE, EDINBURGH
& KATY MASON, LANCASTER.
COA...
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Calculating and accounting for the future of innovation

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Presentation by Duncan Chapple and Professor Katy Mason at the 31st annual meeting of the Society for the Advancement of Socio-Economics.

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Calculating and accounting for the future of innovation

  1. 1. CALCULATING AND ACCOUNTING FOR THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION PRESENTING: DUNCAN CHAPPLE, EDINBURGH & KATY MASON, LANCASTER. COAUTHORS: NEIL POLLOCK, EDINBURGH NURGÜL ÖZBEK, HHS NAJMEH HAFEZIEH, ROYAL HOLLOWAY ANNA YANKULOVA, UCD
  2. 2. Ordering the perfect storm • Intermediaries play a vital role in the creation of futures • But what work is done in their production? – How do vendors struggle to become ‘cool vendors’ – What happens when firms, or entire technologies, are found to be obsolete – How do those outside the intermediaries shape how the intermediaries shape – There is a plurality of contestations around the intermediaries • Many contestants • Many things being contested
  3. 3. Why framings matter: An example of a Gartner, Inc. Hype Cycle Widely used to align ideas about the future • Enduring ‘furniture’ with nested framings This example, 2010, is suggestive of performative effects. • E.g. real-time temperature and humidity monitoring, as one category, forces M&A while modular electronic health record systems become obsolete
  4. 4. Accounting for the future of innovation • The different roles of analysts in influencing the field • How power is unevenly distributed across different analysts in constructing categories – different practices they are engaged in. • Different elements of the frameworks shown in the literature articles – to dig out what the material demonstrates most
  5. 5. INTERMEDIARIES AS CATALYSTS OF MARKETS - WHERE MARKET ACTORS COLLIDE - WHERE THEY CONTEST AND IMAGINE NEW VERSIONS OF WHAT IS BECOMING - WHERE FACTS AND FICTIONS ARE REASSEMBLED AS ANTICIPATORY VERSIONS OF THE WORLD - THE FACT AS “THE” STABILISED VERSION OF AN AUTHORISED VERSION OF REALITY - LEGITIMATION OF THE INTERMEDIARIES’ AUTHORITY
  6. 6. o HOWELLS, 2006 - TYPES AND FUNCTIONS - WHAT BUNDLES OF PRACTICES EXIST - WHAT DO THEY TRY TO ACHIEVE o BESSY AND CHAUVIN, 2013 IF YOU CAN DISTINGUISH FORM AND TYPE OF INTERVENTION OF ACTORS’ EFFECT, YOU CAN STUDY THE SOCIAL ORGANIZATION OF MARKETS KEY REFERENCES
  7. 7. Christian Bessy and Pierre-Marie Chauvin Valuation Studies 1(1) 2013: 83–117 • “We show how intermediaries contribute to define valuation through their different activities and foster valuation frames that can improve the coordination of actors, but also reorganize the markets in different ways.”
  8. 8. Methods • Searches on ‘Cool Vendor’ documentation • Reviewed several Hype Cycles, initially in the area of health, to identify potential informants • 17 semi-structured interviews with analysts involved in producing Hype Cycles and similar devices at other firms
  9. 9. What we looked for 1. Function to influence the field or mobilize the market 2. Category construction practices 3. Comments and Exemplary quotes 4. Notes on the characteristics of the valuation frame & Analysts’ resources
  10. 10. Indicative findings # Function Category Quotes and notes 13 Knowledge combination and re- generation framing They talk to vendors and clients and then articulate the translation of what this particular technology does for the market, what he calls ‘balancing the supply and demand’. The challenge is to have analysts to cover what happens both in the network (media) and IT. 13 Gate- keeping framing, (also discriminating across emerging categories?) “If we don’t have some indication from the market place there’s demand for this, we won’t cover it. -.. what matters most is what you need to do to pass it by existing customers”. 14 framing, discriminating The quote refers to how they construct categories based on their revenue expectation: “Decision to cover a category comes from the revenue expectations: market has to be large enough that you can make MarketScape that is going to at least cover its cost or grow fast – marketing dollars need to participate. .. (As an analyst) you are rating firms, and out of ten firms, three or four are going to be rated highest. There is good likelihood those firms are going to buy reprint rights.” 15 Information processing; Knowledge generation and combination framing, experimenting , validating categories “So we start to track a certain market. We create a new practice or community of eight or ten analysts. Those eight or ten analysts create a first draft of the definition of a certain category, and then we start to publish something based on the feedback from the market and from the other colleagues across the firm. We refine that taxonomy and after a couple of iteration it stands still for probably five or ten years with minor adjustments. “
  11. 11. Discussion • Bessy and Chauvin show a clear division of labour: intermediaries produce frames; market participants consume them. • However, our research finds that many frames are produced through collective, co-creative processes of challenges: a plurality of contestations where leadership can be distributed – Plural, in that the frames themselves are being challenged by the vendors and reformed in conflict with them (e.g the creation, visualisation, and destruction of market categories) – Contestations, in that vendors signal their acceptance or rejection of these emerging frames, both through market demand and the self-interested amplification of these frames • These frames, such as categories, are also bound to time: the ‘authorised version’ of the truth includes the future expiry and subdivision of categories • Unlike Bessy and Chauvin, we show the production of frames to be iterative, contested and largely conducted ‘backstage’ while the ‘on stage’ diffusion of these frames is a dyadic legitimisation process designed to stimulate the consumption of the new frames. • A new didactive interpretive space, a new community of practice, and thus a new version of the market are co-created in a moment which makes this frame performative, and allows the possible to be become real
  12. 12. CALCULATING AND ACCOUNTING FOR THE FUTURE OF INNOVATION PRESENTING: DUNCAN CHAPPLE, EDINBURGH & KATY MASON, LANCASTER. COAUTHORS: NEIL POLLOCK, EDINBURGH NURGÜL ÖZBEK, HHS NAJMEH HAFEZIEH, ROYAL HOLLOWAY ANNA YANKULOVA, UCD

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