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Youth Alcoholism

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Youth Alcoholism

  1. 1. Youth Alcoholism Ages: 12 to 25 By Danielle Herry
  2. 2. Introduction: • Underage drinking is when anyone under the minimum legal drinking age of 18 years of age drinks alcohol. • Underage drinking is a risk that attracts many developing adolescents and teens. • When young people try alcohol, they often don’t realize the damaging effects drinking can have on their own lives, their families, bystanders and the broader community.
  3. 3. Recognizing the signs of underage drinking: The warning signs are: Academic and/or behavioral problems in school Changing groups of friends Less interest in activities and/or appearance Finding alcohol among a young person’s things or smelling alcohol on their breath Slurred speech Coordination problems Memory and/or concentration problems
  4. 4. •Race and ethnicity. Some racial groups, such as Islanders, Indigenous and also anyone from any ethnicity or culture; for example, are more at risk than others of developing alcohol addiction. •Genetics. A teen with an alcoholic sibling or parent is four times more likely to develop a problem with alcohol than someone without such a family history. •The presence of mental health disorders. Alcohol problems often go hand in hand with mental health problems such as depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, and schizophrenia. •Personality traits. Teenagers who believe alcohol makes it easier to socialize, for example, tend to drink more than those who don’t believe that alcohol loosens their social inhibitions. •Influence of family and peers. Teens are at greater risk for developing alcohol-related problems when alcohol is readily available at home or among their peer group, and drunkenness is acceptable. •Gender. Men are more likely to drink heavily than women, but women become addicted at lower levels and shorter duration of use. •Drinking may have lasting health effects. Some researchers believe that heavy drinking at this age, when the brain is still developing, may cause lasting impairments in brain functions such as memory, coordination, and motor skills—at least among susceptible individuals. •Drinking can lead to sexual assaults and rape. Each year, approximately 97,000 students between the ages of 17and up to 25 are victims of alcohol- related sexual assault or date rape. •Teenage girls who drink are more likely to have unprotected sex, than girls who don’t drink, putting them at increased risk of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases Barriers:
  5. 5. Impacts: Aged: 12 to 25 years While teens as young as age 12 admit to this practice, it becomes more popular in mid-adolescence and peaks in the high schools or collage years. Students between the ages of 18 and 25 are more likely to report binge drinking than non-students of the same age. Recent news reports of deaths from alcohol poisoning on college campuses have spotlighted the dangers of binge drinking. Binge drinkers are eight times more likely than other college students to:  Miss classes  Absent from work  Fall behind in schoolwork  Be injured  Damage property  Underage and binge drinking is risky and can lead to car accidents, violent behaviours, alcohol poisoning, and other health problems.
  6. 6. Statistics:
  7. 7. The effect to the human body and mind: The effect to the human body( biological responses) will be determine by factors such as:  Examples: Body mass/size, : Gender/ age : Experience of drinking : Nutrition and individual metabolism Also high consumption of alcohol will lead to • Examples: Drowsiness/ loss of balance : Nausea/ vomiting : Aggression/ increased coercion in females : Homelessness/ unemployment due to absent from work : Crime and assaults
  8. 8. Alcoholism is also known as a family disease:- •Alcoholics may be young children, teenage, or grown-up children and they have brothers or sisters; they have parents or other relatives. •An alcoholic can totally disrupt family life and cause harmful effects that can last a lifetime. Each member of the family may be affected by alcohol differently. •Adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) are four times more likely than children of non-alcoholics to develop alcoholism. Parents drinking behavior and favorable attitudes about drinking have been positively associated with adolescents' initiating and continuing drinking While alcoholism treatment programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous help people with alcohol dependence to stop drinking and improve their life styles, family and marital therapy and various self- help groups help alcoholic families to improve their own well-being. The Family Institution •Families of alcoholics need treatment just as much as alcoholics. Marriage and family counselors can help with the tensions created in the alcoholic’s home between partners to their children. •Alcohol affects each member of the family – from the unborn child to the alcoholic’s spouse. Its far-reaching affects result in not only physical problems for the alcoholics, but also may result in physical and psychological problems for other members of the family and children who are dependent are reported to have highest rates of physical abuse, sexual abuse, violent victimization. •
  9. 9. The Impacts of Alcohol on the Education system •How does problem drinking affect young people's schooling? Drinking can affect the biological development of young people as well as their school-related achievement and behavior. •Alcohol use has significant neurological consequences on our young generations. Alcohol damages areas of the brain responsible for learning and memory, verbal skills and on their cognitive abilities. •The 2000 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse (NHSDA - now known as the National Survey on Drug Use and Health), a federal study, found that as rates of alcohol use by 12- to 17-year- olds increase, grade point averages decrease. •In the community there are measures to prevent adolescent from drinking alcohol use an this also includes policy interventions and educational programs that have been put in place at schools to prevent under aged drinking. • The local police, AOD workers and hospital staff are working with schools to develop a better relationship between these services and students to address alcohol behaviors in the community. •Activities were incorporated into some schools by these services like AOD workers, emergency department nurses, police, youth liaison officers, and young people who had physical or mental illness resulting from excessive alcohol consumption. • The effect it has on these children are means that they will be absent from school, loss of brain functions which then becomes a mental illness, alcohol-related behaviour, depression, self-harm and suicide. • So by re-educating these 12 to 16 year olds and introducing them back into society will reduce unemployment and they will get better jobs, it will help them to form better relationships with family and friends, there will be less stress on the court system. • By helping this age group to understand how to get better accommodation in the future and how they themselves will be better role models for the future generations.
  10. 10. Children from 12 to 14 years don’t get unemployment benefits but their parents receive their payments. So when these children disassociate themselves from their family they are forced to prostitute themselves to get money, so they can buy the necessities that are needed for daily living. So these young kids face having: •No family • No Supports •Safety issues •Housing issues •Starvation These young children who live on the streets aged 15 to 25 years old, do get centrelink payments but these teens/youths go and spend their money on alcohol and other drugs. There are many services to support the young person, contact via web or call for help: Kids Helpline - call 1800 55 1800. Youth Beyond Blue1300 224636 www.beyondblue.org.au Reach Out.com Headspace : 1800 650 980 www.eheadspace.org.au The Butterfly Foundation 1430 Malvern Road Glen Iris VIC 3146 Lifeline - call 13 11 14 Addiction can be a complex disease, or disorder - a vicious cycle that can be very difficult to break without the right support.  Mission Australia : Work with people across all areas of personal development, with the goal of breaking the addiction and living a happy, healthy life without problematic alcohol and drug use. While not everyone who drinks alcohol has an addiction, people who misuse these can experience devastating impacts on their physical, emotional and mental health. The reason young children develop addiction because they are dealing with issues like grief and loss, experiences of violence and trauma, sexual abuse, or mental health issues. In reality, drug and alcohol addiction is a complex disease because it changes the brain in ways that makes stopping very difficult, even for people who really want to stop and alcohol addiction remains one of the most pressing health and social issues facing young Australians.. Mental illness will affect a person’s psychological, physical, emotional and spiritual wellbeing, there will also be alcohol-related behaviour, depression, self-harm and suicide.. The impact of mental illness on people’s ability to function varies for every individual. Health System
  11. 11. Strategies to Prevent Underage Drinking School Strategies:  Based on behavioral theory and knowledge of risk and protective factors  Developmentally appropriate information about alcohol and other drugs  Development of personal, social, and resistance skills  Emphasis on normative education  Multiple sessions over multiple years  Teacher training and support  Active family and community involvement  Cultural sensitivity  Extracurricular Strategies  Supervision by positive adult role models  Youth leadership  Intensive programs  Incorporation of skills building  Part of a comprehensive prevention plan  Family Strategies  Improvement of parent-child relations using positive reinforcement, listening and communication skills, and problem solving  Provision of consistent discipline and rulemaking  Monitoring of children’s activities during adolescence  Strengthening of family bonding  Involvement of child and parents  Minimum legal drinking age of 21  Citizen action to reduce commercial and social availability of alcohol  Underage drinking presents an enormous public health issue. Alcohol is the drug of choice among children and adolescents.  Annually, about 5,000 youth under age 18 die from motor vehicle crashes, other unintentional injuries, and homicides and suicides that involve underage drinking.  As the lead Federal agency for supporting and conducting basic and applied research on alcohol problems, NIAAA is spearheading an Initiative on Underage Drinking to intensify research, evaluation, and outreach efforts in this important area.  This special Highlight section of the Alcohol Policy Information System(APIS Web site) provides convenient access to APIS policy topics that pertain to underage drinking.  Federal Law for Prohibitions Against Hosting Underage Drinking Parties These laws often are closely linked to laws prohibiting furnishing alcohol to minors, although laws establishing State-imposed liability for hosting underage drinking parties may apply without regard to who furnishes the alcohol. Hosts who allow underage drinking on their property as well as supply the alcohol consumed or possessed by the minors may be in violation of two distinct laws: furnishing alcohol to a minor and allowing underage drinking to occur on property they control.  It is now against the law in Victoria to serve alcohol in a private home to anyone under 18, unless their parent or guardian has given permission.
  12. 12. • Alcohol Education - lifeeducation.org.au • www.helpguide.org/harvard/the-dangers-of-teenage-drinking.htm • https://www.niaaa.nih.gov/alcohol-health/special-populations.../underage-drinking • http://www.druginfo.adf.org.au/topics/quick-statistics#sthash.dncahN4G.dpuf • www.teendrinkinglaw.vic.gov.au/ • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism's (NIAAA's) World Wide Web site at http://www.niaaa.nih.gov. • www.kidshelp.com.au (24/7 crisis support) • www.eheadspace.org.au • www.beyondblue.org.au Thank you for attending.

Notas do Editor

  • Every one knows that alcohol attracts all or most under aged adolescents and teen in the community and when they drink they don’t understand the effects or damage it is doing to their body and mind. People use alcohol for a wide range of reasons and in different social and cultural contexts. They may drink for sociability, cultural participation, religious observance or as a result of peer influence. They may also drink for pleasure, relaxation, mood alteration, enhanced creativity, intoxication, addiction, boredom, habit, to overcome inhibitions, to escape or forget or to ‘drown sorrows’.
  • Anyone who interacts with young people should pay close attention to the warning signs that may indicate underage drinking.
  • The case for AOD education is this: young people need to be informed about these issues because they live in a world in which AOD use is everywhere. Even if young people don’t use these substances, AOD can affect their lives in a number of ways.
  • By having a guidelines sent to all parents on how the schools are willing to educate their students about alcohol consumption will also set standards for the rules at home.

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