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Science Fair HOWTO-20081208.ppt

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Science Fair HOWTO-20081208.ppt

  1. 1. Helping a Child with His or Her Science Fair Project
  2. 2. www.societyforscience.org www.sciencefair.usm.edu Mississippi Region VI Science & Engineering Fair
  3. 3. Why should my child do a science fair project? •Integrates skills and arts •Prepares students for public speaking •Prepares students for defending one’s work •Provides self validation and excitement •Opens doors of opportunity •Evaluated by top scientists •May provide cash payoff •May be Required by the teacher
  4. 4. • Provide encouragement and supplies • Remind yourself “it is the child’s project!” • Provide transportation to gather research • Allow Internet access • Help design a project that is safe and properly supervised • Help at the local school fair • Prepare a mutually agreed upon (you and child) timeline depending on when the project is due Your Job as a Parent
  5. 5. Remember! This is not a competition among parents. Science Fairs are learning experiences for the students that promote higher learning skills. Cheer
  6. 6. Helping Your Child Choose a Topic •Become familiar with the Scientific Method • Pick a topic that interests your child • Could it benefit your community? • Can it solve a problem? • Don’t be afraid to try something new • Read science magazines to learn current science • Make sure you have the time and equipment for the topic • Read about the subject and talk to people in that field
  7. 7. Project Categories • Animal Sciences • Behavioral and Social Science • Biochemistry • Cellular & Molecular Biology • Chemistry • Computer Science • Earth Science • Eng. Electrical & Mechanical • Eng. Materials & Bioengineering •Environmental Management •Environmental Sciences •Mathematical Sciences •Medicine and Health •Microbiology •Energy & Transportation •Physics and Astronomy •Plant Sciences
  8. 8. Remember A Science Fair Project is more than just an informational poster report—the simplest experiment will get more attention than the most beautiful poster
  9. 9. The scientific method is a process for experimentation that is used to explore observations and answer questions. Scientists use the scientific method to search for cause and effect relationships in nature. In other words, they design an experiment so that changes to one item cause something else to vary in a predictable way. http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_scientific_method.shtml
  10. 10. The Scientific Method Ask a Question Do Background Research Construct Hypothesis Experiment- Test Hypothesis Analyze Data Draw Conclusions Report Results (Was your Hypothesis Correct?)
  11. 11. Remember Even if you disprove your hypothesis, your experiment is probably still valid.
  12. 12. • Write a detailed research plan describing how you plan to conduct your research (How will you answer your question?) • Form your hypothesis (an educated guess)— If I do this then something will happen • Develop a procedure • Always obtain the appropriate approvals before starting your research including: Develop a Research Plan
  13. 13. • Complete the required forms required by your school (Parent or Guardian must sign) • Write the abstract • Put Safety First! Develop a Research Plan (continued)
  14. 14. General Judging Criteria • Creative Ability • Scientific Thought or Engineering Goals • Thoroughness • Skill • Clarity • Teamwork if Applicable
  15. 15. Keep a Journal of Your Observations and Results
  16. 16. Writing an Abstract Purpose of the Experiment An introductory statement of the reason for investigating the topic of the project. A statement of the problem or hypothesis being studied. Procedures Used A summarization of the key points and an overview of how the investigation was conducted. An abstract does not give details about the materials used unless it greatly influenced the procedure or had to be developed to do the investigation. An abstract should only include procedures done by the student. Work done by a mentor (such as surgical procedures) or work done prior to student involvement must not be included.
  17. 17. Writing an Abstract (continued) Observation/Data/Results This section should provide key results that lead directly to the conclusions you have drawn. It should not give too many details about the results nor include tables or graphs. Conclusions Conclusions from the investigation should be described briefly. The summary paragraph should reflect on the process and possibly state some applications and extensions of the investigation.
  18. 18. Display and Safety Regulations
  19. 19. Document your Procedures with Photographs Remember! •Many items are not allowed on the presentation board or table, so it is best to take pictures of your procedures as you go •Parents do not forget to take pictures of your students performing their procedures •Written permission required from people in photos (other than student)
  20. 20. Exhibit Space Regional Fair 5 feet long 3 feet wide Table (size should be no more than 3’ x 3’) Student Space International Table: 76 cm (30in) deep; 122 cm (48in) wide; 274 cm (108 in) high, including table. Table height should not exceed 91 cm (36in).
  21. 21. Journal By John Smith Do Goldfish Blow Bubbles to Breathe? The goldfish is a very interesting fish that requires minimal care. Etc. Etc. Etc. MATING Goldfish mature when they are only 10-15 cm long. They spawn in pairs and their mating behaviour includes chasing. Females become very fat when their abdomens are swelled with their eggs.SPAWNING Goldfish spawn in summer. Eggs are laid among aquatic plants.EGGS Over 100,000 small (1 mm in diameter), sticky Goldfish eggs are released by the female. The eggs hatch 1 week later.JUVENILES Young Goldfish attach themselves to aquatic plants for a few days until their yolk sac has been absorbed by them. When your goldfish blows bubbles in the water it means that your goldfish is bubbling air in water. Ref: Wiki Report By John Smith What’s not right? Award Not Experiment Glass/ Water Animal Fish Food
  22. 22. Good Example
  23. 23. Create the exhibit board (Display and Safety Rules) • Appealing to the eye • Explain what was done and discovered without being wordy • Use photos/pictures, diagrams, subtitles • Use color and arrows to separate ideas • Avoid expensive tools – be artistic and show your involvement • Clearly outline the project – how it works, and was created • Don’t crowd your board Prepare the Presentation
  24. 24. • Be able to explain your project - rehearse • Looking good doesn’t necessarily mean it is good • Keep it neat/clean • Relax and enjoy the experience Talk about your project
  25. 25.  Find a topic that interests you  Narrow topic to a specific problem  Develop an experiment to solve the problem  Discuss the project with your parents and teacher ISEF rules and regulation  Develop a hypothesis  Write a detailed research plan  After approvals, begin your experiment  Make observations/collect data Student Checklist
  26. 26.  Interpret the observations/data  Draw conclusions  Finalize presentation  Write abstract Create the exhibit board Display and Safety Regulations  Practice presenting your work and prepare to answer questions  Present the project  Make observations/collect data Student Checklist (continued)
  27. 27. Code of Conduct Students Will treat the other participants in the fair with courtesy and respect. No swearing. Will remain near their projects in their assigned aisle at all times except during scheduled breaks or during pre- approved restroom visits. May play board or card games and talk quietly with nearby students as long as they do not interfere with the judging process. May use personal stereo and game devices as long as they are used with earphones or in a silent mode. •Will obey the instructions of all the Science Fair staff and judges.
  28. 28. •Will not steal from other participants in the fair. •Will not harass other participants in the fair. •Will not leave the science fair without their parents or sponsors. •Will not block the aisles with their personal gear. •Will not use or possess cell or digital phones, walkie talkies, two-way radios or other communication devices on the floor of the science fair. •Will not use toys such as yo-yos, balls or other projectiles •Will not run or participate in other forms of horseplay on the exhibit floor. •May not bring food and drinks to snack on. Students will only be able to visit the snack bar during their lunch break. Code of Conduct (Students)
  29. 29. Code of Conduct (Parents) • Provide your child with a hearty breakfast before the event, so they won’t get hungry during the event • Help your child set up the exhibit • Then leave and go to the designated waiting area • Do not communicate with your child during the judging • Do not try to influence the judges • Remove all disallowed items immediately • You may be a judge, but not in your child’s category • Attend the awards ceremony with your child • Do not disturb the ceremony if you disagree with the results • Help your child with the project, but do not do it for him or her (The judges can tell if the student did not do it)
  30. 30. Failure to Follow the Rules Could Lead to the Removal of the Student and the Project from the Competition
  31. 31. • Don’t get upset or worry about awards, and please attend the award ceremony • Remember—not everyone can win • Plan for next year (continuing projects) • You and your Child should feel pride and accomplishment no matter what the outcome Your Job as a Parent After the Science Fair
  32. 32. Excellence in Marine Sciences Award Projects relating to Marine or Coastal Environmental Issues may be eligible for this special monetary award!
  33. 33. Rules and Guidelines Intel ISEF Rules and Guidelines Completing Paperwork Properly completing all of the paperwork is a necessary and important part of completing your science fair project. These links can help steer you in the right direction. Intel ISEF Rules Wizard Asks questions about your planned project and tells you which forms you need to complete. Overview of Forms and Dates Provides a brief explanation of each form in the Rules and Regulations, and when it should be completed. Common Scientific Review Committee (SRC) Problems Summarizes SRC reviews leading up to the 2005 Intel ISEF, with pointers about what NOT to do.
  34. 34. Web Links Science project information http://www.societyforscience.org/isef/primer/index.asp Rules and Guidelines http://www.societyforscience.org/isef/about/ rules_regulations.asp Writing an abstract http://www.societyforscience.org/isef/students/ abstract.asp Display and Safety Regulations http://www.societyforscience.org/isef/students/ aff_regulations.asp

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