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Employing Telematics to Transform Workers' Compensation

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Employing Telematics to Transform
Workers’ Compensation
Rising competition and claims costs, tougher regulatory demands an...
cognizant 20-20 insights 2
Telematics and Disruption in the
Insurance Industry
The insurance industry learned about the po...
cognizant 20-20 insights 3
Creating a Smarter, More Connected
Workers’ Comp Ecosystem
Workers’ comp insurers face several ...
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Employing Telematics to Transform Workers' Compensation

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Various pressures like heightened competition, rising costs and tougher regulations are compelling workers' compensation insurers to automate their systems, connect their people, processes and devices, and distill accurate, real-time information from the digital data that that encircles people, processes, organizations and devices. Telematics - technologies that integrate telecommunications and information can be the key to achieving these goals, all through a proactive, smarter, tightly connected environment.

Various pressures like heightened competition, rising costs and tougher regulations are compelling workers' compensation insurers to automate their systems, connect their people, processes and devices, and distill accurate, real-time information from the digital data that that encircles people, processes, organizations and devices. Telematics - technologies that integrate telecommunications and information can be the key to achieving these goals, all through a proactive, smarter, tightly connected environment.

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Employing Telematics to Transform Workers' Compensation

  1. 1. Employing Telematics to Transform Workers’ Compensation Rising competition and claims costs, tougher regulatory demands and pressure to more effectively manage risk and prevent loss are compelling workers’ compensation insurers to embrace more automated and connected ways of working, and to distill more meaning from the digital data that encircles people, processes, organizations and devices. Executive Summary We are witnessing a transformation of the auto insurance industry that is turning decades-old underwriting practices upside down. Fueling this shift is telematics — technologies that integrate telecommunications and information across a variety of networks and devices. The traditional approach of setting premiums based on proxy variables is now challenged by the steady flow of real-time telematic data, and the ability to perform loss-prevention processes at virtually any time, from almost anywhere. Given the current maturity of the telematics industry and the ubiquity of the Internet of Things (IoT),1 the sea change affecting the auto insurance space is a harbinger of opportunities to radically transform several other insurance lines of business (LOBs). One area that lends itself to a broad spectrum of telematics applications is workers’ compensation. Pushed by external and internal challenges — increasing competition, rising claims costs and heightened regulatory pressures — the workers’ comp industry has reached a tipping point that obliges companies to continually improve operational performance, enhance risk assessment, prevent loss and conquer critical issues around profitability. In our view, telematics can be employed by the workers’ comp sector to achieve significant profit improvements. The application of these technolo- gies can prevent losses/accidents in real time — vastly improving carriers’ loss ratio. The positive impact of loss prevention is higher in this industry, since there are significant indirect losses related to productivity. In the following pages, we discuss the elements of this strategic opportunity and lay out foundational insights that clarify how telematics can help the workers’ comp industry create a smarter and more connected ecosystem. We then detail how insurers can employ wireless sensor networks, mobile devices, gamification, social networking, Google Glass and other IoT platforms to create such an environment. Finally, we reveal how this transformational ecosystem can bring about a win-win-win situation for insurers, employers and workers alike. • Cognizant 20-20 Insights cognizant 20-20 insights | february 2015
  2. 2. cognizant 20-20 insights 2 Telematics and Disruption in the Insurance Industry The insurance industry learned about the potential of telematics when it witnessed the radical change the technology brought to auto insurance. For years, auto insurers had underwritten policies by assessing academic actuarial tables combined with data on a customer’s driving history, prior claims and other proxy variables. But the rise of telematics and the resulting ability to collect real-time, individualized driving data is changing this process. On the whole, telematics is enabling a smarter (more data), more connected (collabor- ative) ecosystem for insurers and their customers. This has resulted in visible positive outcomes for those insurers that employ telematics — resulting in improvements in underwriting (UW) profits of about 4%.2 These factors pose the question: Can the auto insurance telematics ecosystems created through “smart cars” and “connected cars” be replicated in the workers’ compensation industry as “smart factories” and “connected workforces?” * Michael Fitzgerald, “An Internet for Manufacturing,” MIT Technology Review. technologyreview.com ** Industrial Internet: Pushing the Boundaries of Minds and Machines. GE. Commercial and consumer M2M device connections by industry sector worldwide, 2020. 1 TB raw data per day at a large refinery 0.75 TB data per week at an offshore field 10,000+sensors across 180,000sq. ft. at GE’s new battery plant* 200+ sensors per car projected by 2020 396,000 sensors to be deployed by 2025 in diesel electric locomotives alone** The Growth of Wireless Sensor Technologies Across Entities Figure 1 How Telematics Powers the Smart Factory According to industry experts, the smart factory3 industry will rapidly expand in terms of demands and advancements over the next few years. The market is expected to reach a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of over 8% from 2013 to 2018. The business is motorized by the growth of wireless sensor technologies. Figure 1 depicts the growth of these devices across various entities. Industry sectors, be they automotive, utilities, FMCGs, medical or otherwise, have shown a voracious appetite for building “smart” factories, which should drive significant time and cost savings for insurers looking to create a viable workers’ comp ecosystem. To facilitate this, insurers must seamlessly integrate with these telematics devices, capture and make meaning from the resulting data. If the employer has not yet invested in these devices, the insurer should approach them on a case-by-case basis, where the cost can be borne fully by the employer, by the insurer or on a shared basis.
  3. 3. cognizant 20-20 insights 3 Creating a Smarter, More Connected Workers’ Comp Ecosystem Workers’ comp insurers face several roadblocks when it comes to risk-assessment and loss-pre- vention processes. Among these: • The traditional mode of risk assessment. This issue must be examined from three per- spectives: >> Frequency of data. Typically, underwriters analyze an insured’s loss exposure a few days a year prior to issuing a policy and during renewal time. Insurers do not receive real- time workplace data throughout the year. >> Amount of data. Traditionally, loss-control surveys take place over only a few days. Loss-exposure events can occur on any oth- er day — leaving insurers without key infor- mation. >> Quality of data. Typically, underwriters pre- pare a standard loss survey questionnaire comprising 30-40 questions. The quality of the data captured depends on the loss sur- vey undertaken by the loss control consul- tant. Data quality can be undercut if perti- nent questions are omitted. • Fragmented approaches for loss-prevention. Workers’ comp insurers focus on assuring safety by preventing losses in the work environ- ment. The most common method is to employ the services of a loss control consultant or industrial hygiene service manager who surveys the workplace and provides recommenda- tions. Some insurers also utilize safety training, workshops, videos and documentation accessed online or provided by internal staff or external vendors. (For example, a leading commercial insurer recently launched an online toolkit that delivers risk-management information directly to its construction client’s desktops). Nonethe- less, incident rates among employers continue to increase — rising by roughly 14% in the first quarter of 2014.4 There are several key reasons why insurers’ loss-prevention measures remain ineffective: >> No mechanism for delivering safety prod- ucts and tools from the insurer’s Web site to the worker “right here, right now.” >> Safety training only happens a few times a year; sustaining a viable safety culture is the biggest challenge. >> Lack of reinforcement or real-time knowl- edge of workplace safety. >> No mechanism for capturing data and per- forming analytics based on “a day in the life of a worker.” Insurers examine workers’ data only during premium audit. >> Lack of awareness among employers on how safety can reduce their workers’ comp costs. >> Inadequate efforts to motivate/reward work- ers who follow safety best practices in the workplace. >> Low productivity of loss-control consultants. As mentioned above, the imperative for workers’ compensation insurers is to bolster their risk- assessment and loss-prevention practices through the creation of a smarter, more connected envi- ronment (see Figure 2 below). Creating a Smarter, More Connected Environment Figure 2 Mobile App Smart Factory Social CommunityWearables Gamification & Reward Schemes Collaboration through individual apps among all stakeholders — workers, safety managers, line supervisors, loss-control consultants and underwriters. Motivation and active reinforcement of safety among workers/employees. An additional platform for enabling enhanced loss prevention among workers. Safety community, safety champions, blogs to increase collaboration on preventing loss in the workplace. Sensors (temperature, gas, pressure, speed), cameras and iBeacons emit real-time and continuous risk information. Cameras iBeacon Pressure Proximity Temperature Gas Speed
  4. 4. The concept of Smart Factories, powered by mobile, social and wearable technologies, has the potential to achieve this kind of telematics ecosystem. This “smart” environment would help generate a blanket of digital information (what we call Code Halos5 ) across all stakeholders in the workplace — workers, safety managers, line supervisors, loss control consultants and insurers. By decoding this digital information (or Code HaloTM ), the workers’ comp industry can effec- tively deconstruct and then enhance its critical business functions, including risk assessment and loss prevention. cognizant 20-20 insights 4 Types of Data Captured Through Code Halos Figure 3 People Equipment Material/Environment Vehicles • Daily work patterns • Claim history • Repeaters • Previous injuries • Safety certifications • Ergonomics • Risk locations • Usage patterns • Locations • Maintenance inputs • Intrinsic hazardous nature of the equipment — hot, sharp, noisy, imbalanced, vibrating • Safety breaches • Energy issues like pressure, temperature • Speed • Acceleration • Sudden brakes • Risk locations • Weight limits • Safety breaches • Hazardous nature • Exposure limits • Lighting, heating and ventilation • Weather conditions • Means of access/egress • Slopes, ramps and steps • Slippery or damaged underfoot conditions • Obstructions Quick Take With wireless sensor networks and mobile technologies capturing a plethora of data, under- writers can now gain access to more real-time, high-volume and high-quality insights. We refer to the data fields that surround people, equipment, vehicles and the environment Code Halos. Figure 3 highlights data points that can be collected through Code Halos. How Code Halo Thinking Can Reinvigorate the Workers’ Comp Ecosystem
  5. 5. Transforming Workers’ Comp Processes With this ecosystem available to all entities, insurers can access a larger pool of data and distill meaning from Code Halo intersections to achieve their workers’ comp objectives: • Improve underwriting efficiencies during new business or renewal risk assessment. • Foster better collaboration and reduce incidents/losses. • Enhance claims management and fraud detection processes Improving Risk Assessment Insurers can combine insights derived from Code Halos or other IoT-generated information to better classify a particular risk during new-busi- ness underwriting or renewals. Concerning new business, the insurer may not have all the loss-exposure information to which theclientisexposed,otherthaninsightspresented by the producer. But with the help of big data drawn from similar/matching clients, insurers can draw parallel insights and develop more accurate estimates for pricing insurance premiums. They can also use this data to fine-tune policy defini- tions related to coverages, conditions, exclusions, etc. Similarly, with access to continuous real-time data on the risks that a particular insured faces during the policy term, the underwriter can make better decisions regarding renewal or midterm adjustment pricing. Improving Risk Monitoring and Loss Prevention Equipped with a telematics ecosystem, an insurer can take several measures to improve safety management and avert loss in the workplace: • Proactively monitor and manage safety concerns. With access to more continuous, real- time sensing data, the insurer can proactively cognizant 20-20 insights 5 Making Workers’ Comp Smarter and More Connected More data leads to more effective risk assessment. More data and more collaboration leads to more effective loss prevention. 1 Minimize Loss Store the Data and Identify Actionable Insights Insurer stores all data collected by employers on cloud platform and leverages it to derive actionable insights and foresights using analytics. Insurers interface with and collect data (Code Halos) that is generated across stakeholders. Risk data is generated through people, equipment, material and the environment (PEME) via: • Wireless sensors and networks • iBeacons Collect Data from Every Nook and Corner of the Workplace Create More Real-Time, Continuous Risk Data Insurer monitors these functions (UW, claims) based on leading indices, and devises required actions. Monitor Continuously and Report Across Functions Improve Efficiency of Risk Assessment Incorporate data collected into the risk-assessment process during new business and renewals. • Support collaboration among stakeholders (workers, safety managers, line supervisors, loss-control consultants and underwriters) in real time, with monitoring using wireless sensor networks, and prescriptive safety using mobile app and social communities. • Better monitor compliance with loss-control recommendations through technology. • Proactively reinforce safety among employees through gamification and reward programs. Improve Claims Management and Fraud Detection • Improve claims triaging, reserving, etc. • Initiate automated claims. • Improve fraud detection. 2 3 4 5 6 7 • Cameras • Mobile apps Figure 4
  6. 6. detect safety issues/breaches and take appro- priate preventive measures (see Figure 5). • Utilize prescriptive management of inci- dents. Based on data collected among various client profiles, insurers can analytically derive predictive and prescriptive insights on safety for employers to implement (see Figure 6). In a smart factory, for instance, the employer uses leading indices to prevent incidents, compared with lagging indices. In this highly connected environment, incidents can be prevented both manually and automatically. We believe that employers need to proactively monitor all events that are prevented, what we refer to as TIP (total incidents prevented) and AIP (auto- mated incidents prevented) rates. A low AIP means that the employer needs to find areas where loss preventions can be automated and manual interventions can be avoided. • Extend the reach and effectiveness of insurers’ safety training, tools and material. Through this ecosystem, insurers can identify exactly what type of safety collateral a worker needs at any given time and place. Based on the data collected, the insurer can correctly target safety tools and collateral and design them accordingly. Safety videos will be most effective if a worker watches them shortly before they embark on a job. Insurers could possibly leverage technologies such as Apple’s cognizant 20-20 insights 6 Using Predictive Analytics to Preserve Safety and Limit Losses Figure 6 Based on Employers’ Code Halos, the Insurer can Gather Analytical Insights. Identify cost of safety misses and predict future trends. Identify safety breach repeaters, safety misses. ! Monitor key metrics such as DART, TIR, severity rates. Identify other employers’ best practices in preventing incidents. Monitor incidents prevented. Make projections of future losses and sample recommendations. Identify how the employer is doing compared with other employers.employers. Automating Incident Prevention Figure 5 A worker is working near a hazardous zone. A proximity sensor senses the worker near the hazardous zone, and starts measuring the time he has spent in the zone. Once the worker exceeds the allowed time, the mobile app sends an alert to the worker, supervisor and the safety manager. The supervisor immediately takes steps to move the worker away from the hazardous zone. ! !
  7. 7. iBeacon and proximity sensors to detect an intersection between the worker’s task, gauge the applicability of safety collateral, and deliver it in the “here and now” (see Figure 7). • Enhance the productivity of the loss-control organization. One of the challenges loss-con- trol organizations face is assuring the produc- tivity of their consultants (LCCs). Through a telematics ecosystem, LCCs are better equipped to effectively manage their clients and perform their daily tasks through a mobile app. They can also monitor and ensure the implementation and closure of their recommendations from a remote office using technologies such as Google Glass. Furthermore, this allows insurers to exercise more control over LCCs’ daily activities, heighten their efficiencies, and reduce travel expenses and operational costs. Figures 8 and 9 illustrate how a LCC is better equipped to manage his recommendations. cognizant 20-20 insights 7 Delivering Just-In-Time Safety Collateral Enabling More Effective Loss Control Consultants A Day in the Life of the Connected LCC Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 ! OSHA OSHA ! • ----- • ----- • ----- A lab assistant walks into the supply room that stores hazardous chemicals. The iBeacon detects his presence and his proximity to the shelf that stores formaldehyde bottles. A safety video on OSHA standards for handling formaldehyde is displayed on a nearby monitor or on the employee’s mobile device. The employee sees the micro video, and has the safety message reinforced. The employee also accesses MSDS information on his mobile device. The operator ensures implementation of all line items; makes modifications if required. The OSHA forklift safety checklist is displayed on the operator’s mobile device. RFID and sensors work to identify that he is a forklift operator and he is about to use the vehicle. A forklift operator logs in and walks towards the vehicle. MSDS LC Survey He discovers that his LC survey recommendation score is low. In the morning, the LCC looks at his mobile app. He drills further and sees that company XYZ’s score is low. He calls the safety manager of company XYZ and connects with him. Safety manager confirms completion of the particular recommendation. The safety manager wears Google Glass and shows the implementation. The LCC views the implementation on his mobile app or desktop and collaborates with the SM on the same. Using his mobile app, the LCC marks the task completed. Become more knowledgeable about successful safety measures taken by other employers. Ratify the implementation of recommendations without having to visit the site. Monitor how the recommendations are being implemented by the clients. Collaborate with underwriters in real time. Receive analytical inputs on safety/loss- related industry trends. Compare performance vis- a–vis other LCCs. Better manage daily tasks, surveys. o oM ieeR
  8. 8. • Employ safety-related gamification. Within this environment, insurers can offer mobile- based, safety-related gaming apps for workers, with the main objective of reinforcing safety through enjoyable, game-based challenges. (These apps would only be used during non- productive hours). The games can be based on safety concepts using entertaining learning methods such as quizzes (e.g., Quizup), or real-time motion games (e.g., Sims). In our experience, gamification can be even more engaging using reward points and leaderboards. • Support community-based safety collabo- ration. The insurer can also offer community- based safety education through social media, blogs and online forums. Mentoring on safety can be provided through collaboration with safety advocates or “coaches”. Blogging and other community discussions can also be facili- tated — resulting in active reinforcement of safety among the workforce. Apart from these applications, this type of connected ecosystem also acts as a great platform for employees to collaborate among themselves and take preventive actions (see Figure 10). Some workers may not be willing to proactively collaborate to prevent a safety breach. Or a forklift operator may not choose to comply with a check list. Likewise, employees may not have any interest in taking part in safety “games.” To counteract these possibilities, employers must find other ways to motivate employees — a goal that can be achieved through reward schemes or “safety” points (see sidebar). cognizant 20-20 insights 8 Better Loss Prevention Through Collaboration Figure 10 A worker logs in to work at 9 a.m. He picks up his work items and walks toward his work station. The worker notices hazardous material leaking in a particular area. He cordons the area with barricades and alerts his supervisor. He takes a picture on his mobile device, then sends an alert to everyone in the building through the app. A forklift operator places a load on a shelf. A pressure sensor detects overload and raises an audible alarm. The operator scans the QR Code on the box using his mobile device. He identifies the box’s content as heavy materials belonging to another zone — preventing a shelf from caving in. ! Heavy equipment Heavy equipment Quick Take Sustaining safety in the workplace is the biggest challenge for both employers and insurers. Successful collaboration in preventing loss depends on the levels of motivation and participation among workers. Reward schemes (e.g., “safety points”) can motivate workers to take part in these programs, and earn rewards when they: • Help the company to implement recommendations made by loss control consultants. • Attend safety trainings proposed by the company. • Receive certification in recommended safety courses. • Mentor co-workers/new colleagues on safety. • Contribute to safety blogs. • Watch the micro safety videos or read the material recommended by company. • Unearth and report safety risks in the workplace. • Make safety modifications where work-arounds are possible. • Play safety games during lunch/break time to learn more about workplace safety. • Motivate employees. The mobile app enables supervisors to approve these safety points prior to rewarding workers. Points can be redeemed by employees for days off, break time or vouchers. The employer can also look to return the savings attained in their workers’ compensation costs with annual bonuses. Ensuring the Sustenance of a Loss-Prevention Culture Through Reward Mechanisms
  9. 9. Reduce premium leakage Improve pricing strategies Reduce claims Top-Line Benefits From Standard Risk Assessment to Big-Data Thinking From Risk Management to Managing Losses From Reactive to Proactive Claims Management Better Detect and Prevent Fraud Expand into non-standard markets Improve cross-sell opportunities Improve customer satisfaction and retention Improve loss-control consultant productivity Reduce operational expenses Make more effective use of safety collaterals Reduce claims operation costs Reduce claims fraud leakage Reduce Expenses Reduce Losses Increase Premium Revenue Bottom-Line Benefits Bottom-Line Benefits 9cognizant 20-20 insights Enhancing Claims Processes and Fraud Detection The telematics ecosystem we describe also allows insurers to transform their claims operations and better detect fraud. Fraudulent claims are a significant and historical problem for workers’ compensation systems — commandeering billions of dollars. Now, with more accurate accident data available in real time, insurers can triage claim information more easily, calculate reserves correctly, detect frauds quickly, and settle claims more accurately. They can also automate the claims FNOL process. In cases of incidents, workplace sensors can detect damage and alert insurers. Insurers can confirm with workers or safety managers whether or not any workers have been injured. If so, a claim can be initiated automatically and reserves set aside. Delivering Profits to Workers’ Comp Insurers We anticipate that the disruptive, transforma- tional technologies of telematics and mobility will gain momentum — empowering insurance carriers to reshape the global workers’ compensation environment. Through this ecosystem, insurers can improve their profitability through process and efficiency enhancements that drive the top and bottom lines, enrich the customer experience and secure customer loyalty (see Figure 11 below and Quick Take, page 10). Apart from these benefits, insurers can look forward to other direct and indirect advantages: • Fewer cancellations and non-renewals due to improved customer/client satisfaction. • Increased satisfaction among agents selling workers’ comp. Driving Operational Performance Improvements that Benefit Both the Top and Bottom Lines Figure 11
  10. 10. cognizant 20-20 insights 10 Quick Take In addition to supporting better safety-management practices within an employer organization, telematics offers several downstream benefits, including cost savings and heightened workforce productivity. How Workers’ Comp Insurers can use Telematics to Enhance Customer Satisfaction The Benefits of a Superior Workplace Safety Culture SMART FACTORY • Reduce incident frequency and severity. • Develop an efficient and effective workforce. • Improve the productivity of individual workers. • Create a sustainable safety culture. • Support an able, healthy and happy work environment. • Strive to make the workplace OSHA VPP star-certified. • Enable root-cause identification and analysis. • Perform industry benchmarking. • Support more timely loss reporting. • Increase closure rates of loss-control recommendations. • Reduce worker comp costs. • Reduce experience modifications (eMods). • Realize medical cost savings. • Avoid litigation. • More effective use of costs related to customer acquisition and retention. • More opportunity to expand into non-tradition- al markets. • A stronger competitive position. • More opportunities to cross-sell. • Less litigation and employer liability payments due to fewer loss incidents. Forward-looking insurers can draw additional value from this emerging ecosystem by extending using their telematics data for other downstream processes, such as claims and policy servicing — extending the reach and the potential of telematics within the organization. Looking Ahead Sooner or later, the workers’ comp industry will approach a moment of truth: Either optimize how business-critical data is captured, organized, analyzed and applied to improve operational efficiency, sustainability and profitability, or face irrelevancy. Telematics holds substantial promise for those insurers aiming to transform their risk- assessment and loss-prevention processes, and can be the key to securing their future. We are seeing a rapid advancement in telematics’ capabilities — from data-monitoring to prescrip- tive applications of the insights and foresights derived. Keeping this in mind, workers’ comp insurers need to take advantage of telematics, and leverage this game-changing technology platform to get and stay ahead of competitors, better serve customers and improve top- and bottom-line numbers. To unlock the power of telematics and deliver tangible value to customers, workers’ comp insurers must consider how new and innovative products, improved services and a safer workplace can truly transform their clients’ workplaces. Early adopters that embrace telematics-enabled Code Halo thinking will gain first-mover advantages and a sustainable competitive edge.
  11. 11. cognizant 20-20 insights 11 References • https://www.osha.gov/Publications/recordkeeping/OSHA_3245_REVISED.pdf • http://www.saberrisksolutions.com/uploads/UserFiles/File/Sample%20Solutions.pdf • http://xlgroup.com/insurance/news/north-america-construction-team-launches-risk-resource • http://www.globalriskconsultants.com/pdf/The%20Day%20of%20an%20Engineer.pdf • http://www.wcrinet.org/studies/public/books/WCRI_2014_Annual_Report_v2.pdfhttp://www.ncci. com/media/pdf/abc_Exp_Rating.pdf • https://www.ncci.com/documents/WC_Claim_Freq-2013.pdf • http://www.naic.org/cipr_newsletter_archive/vol10_data_glance.pdf • http://www.bls.gov/news.release/pdf/osh.pdf • https://www.sedgwick.com/news/WC%20Spotlight/Spotlight%20-%20Issue%2047%20-%20 NCCI%202012%20State%20of%20the%20Line%20FINAL.pdf • http://www.workerscompensation.com/compnewsnetwork/news/20045-osha-citess-central-trans- port.html&rct=j&frm=1&q=&esrc=s&sa=U&ei=PH5PVLH9M9D68QXgwYDwAw&ved=0CB0QqQIoADA E&usg=AFQjCNGhNmbSYW3bvWMGOGIxNrSdJJeALw • http://usa.marsh.com/Portals/9/Documents/Marsh%20NROR%20January%202014%20 Markets%2001%2029%2014.pdf • http://www.nasi.org/usr_doc/NASI_Workers_Comp_Report.pdf • https://www.osha.gov/dts/vtools/construction.html • https://www.osha.gov/dep/fap/recordkeeping_faqs.html • https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=SPEECHES&p_id=217 • http://www.willis.com/documents/publications/Services/Casualty/Casualty_Workers_Comp_0412_ spread_REV3.pdf • https://www.osha.gov/doc/topics/residentialprotection/workerscomp.ppt&rct=j&frm=1&q=&esrc=s&s a=U&ei=kX5PVNikK4LamgXU2IL4Aw&ved=0CBkQFjAB&usg=AFQjCNFXTvnifRDNkUrQudGHYDDWB LIWcA Footnotes 1 The Internet of Things (IoT) is a fast-emerging ecosystem of IP-connected devices with the potential to deliver significant business benefits valued at trillions of dollars in the coming decade, across industries. 2 http://analysis.telematicsupdate.com/insurance-telematics/qa-insurance-telematics-and-intellectual- property 3 Market and Market Research, 2013 - http://www.marketsandmarkets.com/Market-Reports/smart-factory- market-1227.html. 4 Workplace Safety and Health (WSH) Safety Report. http://www.mom.gov.sg/Documents/safety-health/ reports-stats/OSHD-AR2013/WSH_Performance.pdf. 5 For more on Code Halos and innovation, read “Code Rules: A Playbook for Managing at the Crossroads,” Cognizant Technology Solutions, June 2013, http://www.cognizant.com/Futureofwork/Documents/ code-rules.pdf, and the book, “Code Halos: How the Digital Lives of People, Things, and Organizationsare Changing the Rules of Business,” by Malcolm Frank, Paul Roehrig and Ben Pring, published by John Wiley & Sons. April, 2014. http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118862074.html Code Halo™ is a pending trademarks of Cognizant Technology Solutions. Note: The company names presented throughout this white paper are the property of their respective trademark owners, and are not affiliated with Cognizant Technology Solutions, and are displayed for illustrative purposes only. Use of the logo does not imply endorsement of the organization by Cognizant, nor vice versa.
  12. 12. About Cognizant Cognizant (NASDAQ: CTSH) is a leading provider of information technology, consulting, and business process outsourcing services, dedicated to helping the world’s leading companies build stronger business- es. Headquartered in Teaneck, New Jersey (U.S.), Cognizant combines a passion for client satisfaction, technology innovation, deep industry and business process expertise, and a global, collaborative work- force that embodies the future of work. With over 75 development and delivery centers worldwide and approximately 211,500 employees as of December 31, 2014, Cognizant is a member of the NASDAQ-100, the S&P 500, the Forbes Global 2000, and the Fortune 500 and is ranked among the top performing and fastest growing companies in the world. Visit us online at www.cognizant.com or follow us on Twitter: Cognizant. World Headquarters 500 Frank W. Burr Blvd. Teaneck, NJ 07666 USA Phone: +1 201 801 0233 Fax: +1 201 801 0243 Toll Free: +1 888 937 3277 Email: inquiry@cognizant.com European Headquarters 1 Kingdom Street Paddington Central London W2 6BD Phone: +44 (0) 20 7297 7600 Fax: +44 (0) 20 7121 0102 Email: infouk@cognizant.com India Operations Headquarters #5/535, Old Mahabalipuram Road Okkiyam Pettai, Thoraipakkam Chennai, 600 096 India Phone: +91 (0) 44 4209 6000 Fax: +91 (0) 44 4209 6060 Email: inquiryindia@cognizant.com ­­© Copyright 2015, Cognizant. All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the express written permission from Cognizant. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. All other trademarks mentioned herein are the property of their respective owners. About the Authors Prakash Krishnaswamy is an Associate Director within Cognizant’s Insurance Business Unit. He has more than 15 years of consulting and IT experience in the insurance industry, including P&C and life. Prakash holds a master’s degree in computer applications from the University of Madras. He can be reached at Prakash.Krishnaswamy@cognizant.com. Vinodh Stanley Stephen is a Consultant within Cognizant Business Consulting’s insurance Practice. He has worked with clients across the U.S. and APAC, and has extensively researched digital strategies for insurance carriers, especially in developing markets. He has also helped insurers identify how emerging digital technologies can be applied to the insurance industry. Vinodh has a master’s degree in management from the Institute for Financial Management and Research (IFMR) and holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Anna University. He also holds certifications from AICPCU and CII. He can be reached at Vinodhstanley.Stephen@cognizant.com. • http://insurancethoughtleadership.com/the-moment-of-truth-for-telematics-is-near/ • http://www.inboundlogistics.com/cms/article/warehousing-the-safety-zone/ • http://xlgroup.com/insurance/insurance-coverage/property-insurance/construction-risk-engineer- ing-services • http://www.clicksafety.com/docs/whitepapers/clicksafety-focusing-on-the-right-things.pdf?sfvrsn=8 • http://www.safework.sa.gov.au/activitiesandtests/virtualhotel/http://www.unitedcontractors.org/ files/wc_article052813.pdf • https://www.osha.gov/recordkeeping/new-osha300form1-1-04-FormsOnly.pdf • https://www.travelers.com/business-insurance/risk-control/our-expertise.aspx • https://www.travelers.com/business-insurance/risk-control/risk-management-resources/alliances. aspx • http://xlgroup.com/~/media/bf95e40197894025b3a0215f218bb336.pdf • http://www.nationwide.com/cintas-workplace-safety-products.jsp • http://www.novarica.com/static/pdf/preview_Novarica1206-MN-PC-Loss%20Control-2012Q2.pdf

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