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7 models that will
change your Innovation
Management ‘Program’
Carlos Mendes
Co-founder InnovationCast.com
Setting the context.
Good to Great to Gone…
Fortune 500
Companies
1955
60 years later
88% gone
Fortune 500
Companies
1955
vs.
2015
Good to Great to Gone…
The Performance Equation
Errors	
+	
Costs
decrease
Opera&on	/	Execu&on
VS
Our Growth Equation
Errors	
+	
Costs
Opera&on	/	Execu&on
decrease
+ Discovery	
+	
Insights
Innova&on	/	Entrepreneurship
in...
Part I: Working on the mind-set
Organizational
Learning
Organizational
Change
Organizational
Innovation
1 2 3
OUTLINE
Part II: Making the mind-set work
Value Proposition

Design
Lean Startup Net-working &
Communities
4 5 6
Sense-making
7
OU...
What is an organization 

that it may learn?
#1 Organizational Learning
1
2
Individually, the need to move from “everlasting education” to become
“lifelong learners”. The “company” concept has b...
Espoused Theories
vs. Theories-in-use
Governing Variables + Action Strategies => Consequences
Argyris and Schon, 1978
#1 O...
Model I - Theory-in-use
• Be	in	unilateral	
control	

over	others		
• Strive	to	win	and	
minimize	losing	
• Suppressing	
n...
Model II - Theory-in-use
Argyris and Schon, 1978
• Producing	valid,	or	
validatable,		
informa>on	
• Enabling	informed	
ch...
Single vs Double Loop Learning
Governing	Variables	
/	Values	/		Beliefs
Ac>on	Strategies	
and	Techniques
Consequences
Doub...
The major learning inhibitor can be our mindset, based on a pervasive
belief in a “stable state”. It creates inhibiting lo...
The world will keep
changing. How are we going
to stay ahead?
#2 Organizational Change
We think about organizations as deterministic and of change as the
exception. But change is natural and continuous, not th...
Organizational Change
#2 Organizational Change
UNFREEZE MOVE REFREEZE
• Increase	driving	forces	
for	change	
• Decrease	re...
Three Types of Change:
#1 Planned and #2 Collateral
Planned	Change
The	“Sta&c	
Organiza&on”
Unrealized	Change
Realised	Cha...
Three Types of Change:
#3 Emergent Change
The

“Living Company” +
#2 Organizational Change
My model, is inspired by: de Ge...
No change => No learning => No innovation
Learning always precedes innovation and requires change. 

Key Contributions
1
2...
Three Innovation

horizons for growth.
#3 Organizational Innovation
The tyranny of the present can stifle the future. Nowadays, managers
and employees say that they don’t have time to innovat...
Three Horizons of Growth
#3 Organizational Innovation
My model, is inspired by: Alchemy of Growth, 1978; Seeing in Multipl...
Three Horizons of Growth
#3 Organizational Innovation
Horizon	1 Horizon	2 Horizon	3
Execute Search
Improve	the	present Inv...
Without innovation, strategy can only support incrementalism. 

Strategy needs to address both the present and the future....
How can we innovate
towards value and 

positive impact?
#4 Value Proposition Design
1
2 The common methods we use to assess and develop ideas - Business
Plans - don’t work for novelty, where the existing pa...
| 35
Values Proposition Canvas:Osterwalder,2010
The Business Model Canvas
designed by: Strategyzer AG
The makers of Busine...
#4 Value Proposition Design
| 37
Gain Creators
Pain Relievers Pains
Gains
Products
& Services
Customer
Job(s)
Value Proposition Customer Segment
copyr...
#4 Value Proposition Design
#4 Value Proposition Design
#4 Value Proposition Design
#4 Value Proposition Design
| 42Mission Model Canvas:AlexanderOsterwalder and Steve Blank,2016
The Mission Model Canvas
designed by: Strategyzer AG & ...
Key Contributions
1
2 It’s a value-oriented framework that focuses innovation on positive
impact from the outset. It helps...
Customer-Centricity?

Lean Startup practices meet
the corporate world.
#5 Lean Startup
We need organizations that can work at startup’s speed. Being open to
what’s possible and taking the initiative to do some...
Customer Development Model
Model by: Steve Blank, 1999

Illustration by Strategyzer AG
#5 Lean Startup
Customer Validation
Model by: Steve Blank, 1999
Hypotheses
Test
Insight
Design	
Experiment
#5 Lean Startup
Key Principles
#5 Lean Startup
search execu&on
uncertainty
test	most	cri>cal	
assump>ons	first
use	quick	and	cheap	
experim...
Investment Readiness Level
Steve Blank, 2013
Based on NASA/DOD Technology Readiness Level
#5 Lean Startup
9.		Metrics	that...
Created a key distinction between established organizations and
startups: execution vs discovery. Expanded the model by ap...
Digital transformation?
Organizations as
communities & networks
#6 Net-Working and Communities
We think about organizations mostly from the hierarchical, functional or
processual perspectives. This is “myopic”, at lea...
Designing for Communities 

and Networking
#6 Net-Working and Communities
INFORMAL		
VIEW
FORMAL

VIEW
Inspired by: Practi...
Key Contributions
1
2
The learning unit in organizations is not the individual. It is a group,
formal or informal, such as...
How do we make sense of
the world to act in it?
Together!
#7 Sense-Making
We all strive to make sense of what is effective action. Though well
intentioned, we are ‘hostages’ of our mental models.
...
Cynefin (ku-nevin)
making framework
basic types of system:
ex and chaotic.
ms have propensities
ns but no linear material
...
#7 Sense-Making
It helps to move from ‘fail-safe’ idealist approaches, to ‘safe-to-fail’
experimentation, which is imperative to address i...
7
Days.
Models.
Challenges.
So, what can you do tomorrow?
Think of a conversa>on in a situa>on, project or problem where there were some thoughts or
f...
So, what can you do tomorrow?
• Think about a planned change in your life that you
couldn’t realize as intended. 

What em...
So, what can you do tomorrow?
#1 - Individual Perspective
Think about your career and personal
development in three curves...
So, what can you do tomorrow?
Create a

personal
Business
Model You
#4 Value Proposition Design
So, what can you do tomorrow?
Validate your “Business Model You” model by iterating it with your
‘customers’ (colleagues, ...
So, what can you do tomorrow?
Overtime we learn we rewire our brain through 

new, improved or disrupted connections.
Thin...
So, what can you do tomorrow?
Think about a decision and the way you’ve
addressed a problem on the complex 

domain that h...
“Quotebook”
Organizational Learning
“Not that profit and product are
no longer important but without
continuing learning, they will no...
Organizational Change
“The things we fear most in
organizations - fluctuations,
disturbances, imbalances - are
the primary...
Organizational Innovation
“Creativity is thinking up new
things. Innovation is doing
new things.”
– Theodore Levitt
#3 Org...
Value Proposition Design
"You have to start with the
customer experience and work
backwards to the technology”
– Steve Job...
Lean Startup
“Innovation projects are like
flower bulbs. You never know
which ones will pop up as
beautiful flower.“
– Gij...
Net-Work and Communities
“Collaboration is an organizational
imperative of 21st century.
Networks of relationships are the...
Collective Sense-Making
"However beautiful the strategy,
you should occasionally look at the
results."
- Winston Churchill...
I look forward to hearing from you
www.innovationcast.com | carlos.mendes@innovationcast.com
innovationcast®
SOON, THERE WILL
ONLY BE ONE 

TYPE OF COMPANY
innovationcast®
innovationcast®
COMPANIES THAT 

DRIVE GROWTH THROUGH
INNOVATION
innovationcast® 82
Growth	through		
innova>on		
management.
OUR VALUE PROPOSITION prolific
Your	Innova&on	
Opera&ng	System...
innovationcast®
innovationcast®
Leading-edge Innova>on Management SoEware
The game will keep changing. Do you want to stay...
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’
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7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’

Presentation at Roads and Transport Authority and at Dubai Customs, during the UAE Innovation Week, November 2016:

I've been working with enterprise innovation management over the last 10 years. Working with private and public companies all over the world allows me to observe similar patterns in innovation management programs.

When reflecting about what to share at the 2016 UAE Innovation Week, I defined two constraints: present something that 1) could help avoiding the most commons problems that I see, and 2) that you can start using today .

Therefore, I shared 7 models that changed my way of addressing innovation at the organizational level.

They are indispensable to my professional practice and research activities. The models are rooted in the domains of organizational learning, communities of practice, knowledge management, complexity science, strategy and organizational change.

If you're avid for frame-breaking approaches and eager to start thinking and acting anew, I'm sure these models will be able to change your innovation 'program'. For better and for good!

I've included a 7-Day Challenge so you can try them out on a personal level.

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7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’

  1. 1. 7 models that will change your Innovation Management ‘Program’ Carlos Mendes Co-founder InnovationCast.com
  2. 2. Setting the context.
  3. 3. Good to Great to Gone… Fortune 500 Companies 1955
  4. 4. 60 years later 88% gone Fortune 500 Companies 1955 vs. 2015 Good to Great to Gone…
  5. 5. The Performance Equation Errors + Costs decrease Opera&on / Execu&on
  6. 6. VS
  7. 7. Our Growth Equation Errors + Costs Opera&on / Execu&on decrease + Discovery + Insights Innova&on / Entrepreneurship increase
  8. 8. Part I: Working on the mind-set Organizational Learning Organizational Change Organizational Innovation 1 2 3 OUTLINE
  9. 9. Part II: Making the mind-set work Value Proposition
 Design Lean Startup Net-working & Communities 4 5 6 Sense-making 7 OUTLINE
  10. 10. What is an organization 
 that it may learn? #1 Organizational Learning
  11. 11. 1 2 Individually, the need to move from “everlasting education” to become “lifelong learners”. The “company” concept has been designed for reproducing working practices with efficiency and effectiveness in mind. Not for continuous self-transformation by learning. 3 Organisational norms, strategies, processes and workflows that support collective action in companies are designed for repetition and can hinder innovation. Uncertainty and ambiguity, key ingredients of the innovation game, create a lot of anxiety at the very least. The aim to avoid failure at all cost, look good, and face-saving. 
 This amplifies the fear of failure and the addiction to being right. #1 Organizational Learning 3 Key Problems
  12. 12. Espoused Theories vs. Theories-in-use Governing Variables + Action Strategies => Consequences Argyris and Schon, 1978 #1 Organizational Learning
  13. 13. Model I - Theory-in-use • Be in unilateral control 
 over others • Strive to win and minimize losing • Suppressing nega>ve feelings • Act ra>onally • Minimize any encouragement of inquiry and tes>ng • Misunderstanding • Miscommunica>on • Escala>ng errors • Self-sealing processes • Self-fulfilling prophecies Governing variables • Advocate your posi>on in order to be in control and win, etc. • Unilateral face- saving (own and others’) Action strategies Consequences Argyris and Schon, 1978 #1 Organizational Learning
  14. 14. Model II - Theory-in-use Argyris and Schon, 1978 • Producing valid, or validatable, informa>on • Enabling informed choice • Responsibility • Vigilant monitoring of the implemented ac>ons to assess its effec>veness • Effec>ve problem solving • Reduc>on of self- fulfilling, self-sealing, error escala>ng processes • Advocate your posi>on and combine with inquiry and public tes>ng • Minimize unilateral face-saving Skills Required: Reflec&on, experimenta&on, tes&ng of ideas #1 Organizational Learning Governing variables Action strategies Consequences
  15. 15. Single vs Double Loop Learning Governing Variables / Values / Beliefs Ac>on Strategies and Techniques Consequences Double-Loop Learning Single-Loop Learning #1 Organizational Learning
  16. 16. The major learning inhibitor can be our mindset, based on a pervasive belief in a “stable state”. It creates inhibiting loops in organizations. 1 2 As individuals and organizations, we need to “learn about learning”.
 How to bring about transformation with minimal pain and disruption. This is the core competency in a world of constant change. 3 To drive innovation through discovery, we need to be open to being wrong. This implies recognizing the limitations of Model I. And to give a chance to Model II governing variables and action strategies. Key Contributions Models on Organizational Learning #1 Organizational Learning
  17. 17. The world will keep changing. How are we going to stay ahead? #2 Organizational Change
  18. 18. We think about organizations as deterministic and of change as the exception. But change is natural and continuous, not the exception. 1 2 3 Unsuccessful change initiatives put the blame on the “resistance to change”. Is it really resistance or is it a “dynamic conservatism”? We need to let the illusion of stability go and engage in change. But 
 the outcomes may not be immediate or may not be the intended ones. #2 Organizational Change 3 Key Problems
  19. 19. Organizational Change #2 Organizational Change UNFREEZE MOVE REFREEZE • Increase driving forces for change • Decrease resisting forces against change • Make changes • Establish a sense of urgency • Involve people • Create coalition • Make change permanent • Establish new way of things • Reward desired outcomes Prepara&on Implementa&on Make it s&ck Kurt Lewin, 1951
  20. 20. Three Types of Change: #1 Planned and #2 Collateral Planned Change The “Sta&c Organiza&on” Unrealized Change Realised Change Collateral Change #2 Organizational Change My model, is inspired by: Mintzberg, 1985
  21. 21. Three Types of Change: #3 Emergent Change The
 “Living Company” + #2 Organizational Change My model, is inspired by: de Geus 1997,
 Haridimos Tsoukas and Robert Chia, 2002 New Opportuni&es for Change Emergent and Con&nuous Change
  22. 22. No change => No learning => No innovation Learning always precedes innovation and requires change. 
 Key Contributions 1 2 Change has an individual dimension connected to our personal identities, which cannot be ignored. Everyone tends to like novelty. But we need to acknowledge that no one likes being changed so we can prepare accordingly. 3 We need to address the emergent change that is already happening. Get everyone on the look out for its weak signals. Three types of Organizational Change #2 Organizational Change
  23. 23. Three Innovation
 horizons for growth. #3 Organizational Innovation
  24. 24. The tyranny of the present can stifle the future. Nowadays, managers and employees say that they don’t have time to innovate. Even organizations that had significative success and were seen as the most innovative of their times kept having “Kodak moments”. 1 2 Educational and managerial models, developed over the 100+ years, were not designed for innovation. What about the future? Big emphasis on methods to manage or improve the present: Operational Excellence, BPR, TQM, Six Sigma, and so on. 3 The new “silver-bullet” effect: with the pressure to deliver results in an uncertain world, we use tools outside their domain of applicability. That’s how adopting best practices can do a lot of harm. #3 Organizational Innovation 3 Key Problems
  25. 25. Three Horizons of Growth #3 Organizational Innovation My model, is inspired by: Alchemy of Growth, 1978; Seeing in Multiple Horizons, 2008 IMPROVE EXTEND EXPLORE NOW AHEAD FUTURE Time Growth + Strategic 
 and Market FIT
  26. 26. Three Horizons of Growth #3 Organizational Innovation Horizon 1 Horizon 2 Horizon 3 Execute Search Improve the present Invent the future Daily work Long Term Look for Linear Ideas Look for Non linear ideas Sustain Disrupt Exploit Explore Incremental Innovation Radical Innovation 100% Predictability 100% Uncertainty Easier Harder Well known processes and metrics Evidence Based Innovation Improve Do what you do, but be.er. Extend Expand what you do. Explore Find new things to do.
  27. 27. Without innovation, strategy can only support incrementalism. 
 Strategy needs to address both the present and the future. Continually,
 and in parallel. Key Contributions 1 2 3 Thinking about Innovation in 3 Horizons helps us to understand the particularities of each one of them. Each horizon needs to be addressed by different people and through significantly different methods and tools. Innovation is about becoming better at what we do and finding new directions to venture. It is a continuous learning process. Cutting costs on innovation is like shutting down our companies’ immune system. Three Horizons of Growth #3 Organizational Innovation
  28. 28. How can we innovate towards value and 
 positive impact? #4 Value Proposition Design
  29. 29. 1 2 The common methods we use to assess and develop ideas - Business Plans - don’t work for novelty, where the existing patterns and metrics don’t apply. 3 Ideas are very brittle. They can be over-focused on a single aspect of the problem at hand. It is easy to miss what is required for their success. No Value => No Innovation. How can we get people focused on creating ideas with positive impact? #4 Value Proposition Design 3 Key Problems
  30. 30. | 35 Values Proposition Canvas:Osterwalder,2010 The Business Model Canvas designed by: Strategyzer AG The makers of Business Model Generation and Strategyzer This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. strategyzer.com Revenue Streams Customer SegmentsValue PropositionsKey ActivitiesKey Partners Cost Structure Customer Relationships Designed by: Date: Version:Designed for: ChannelsKey Resources #4 Value Proposition Design
  31. 31. #4 Value Proposition Design
  32. 32. | 37 Gain Creators Pain Relievers Pains Gains Products & Services Customer Job(s) Value Proposition Customer Segment copyright: Strategyzer AG The makers of Business Model Generation and Strategyzer The Value Proposition Canvas strategyzer.com #4 Value Proposition Design
  33. 33. #4 Value Proposition Design
  34. 34. #4 Value Proposition Design
  35. 35. #4 Value Proposition Design
  36. 36. #4 Value Proposition Design
  37. 37. | 42Mission Model Canvas:AlexanderOsterwalder and Steve Blank,2016 The Mission Model Canvas designed by: Strategyzer AG & Steve Blank The makers of Business Model Generation and Strategyzer This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License. To view a copy of this license, visit: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ or send a letter to Creative Commons, 171 Second Street, Suite 300, San Francisco, California, 94105, USA. strategyzer.com Mission Achievement/Impact Factors BeneficiariesValue PropositionsKey ActivitiesKey Partners Mission Budget/Cost Buy-in & Support Designed by: Date: Version:Mission/Problem Description: DeploymentKey Resources #4 Value Proposition Design
  38. 38. Key Contributions 1 2 It’s a value-oriented framework that focuses innovation on positive impact from the outset. It helps understanding the value being created for customers with the Value Proposition Canvas and which value is being created for the company with the Business Model Canvas. 3 Value Proposition and Business Model Canvas Great ideas won’t work without an appropriate ‘business model’. This approach provides a structured way to organize, prioritize and communicate hypothesis about it. Success can only come when we get the all the domains right. It instils holistic thinking that helps addressing ideas beyond the product or technology focus. #4 Value Proposition Design
  39. 39. Customer-Centricity?
 Lean Startup practices meet the corporate world. #5 Lean Startup
  40. 40. We need organizations that can work at startup’s speed. Being open to what’s possible and taking the initiative to do something about it, fast. 1 2 3 How can we test Business Models and Value Propositions? They can be very appealing on paper. But they are just hypothesis, i.e., educated guesses. 
 More often than not Innovation Management programs and projects initiatives fail don’t deliver the promised results. Everyone starts off excited. But after a while, we are all dressed up with nowhere to go. #5 Lean Startup 3 Key Problems
  41. 41. Customer Development Model Model by: Steve Blank, 1999
 Illustration by Strategyzer AG #5 Lean Startup
  42. 42. Customer Validation Model by: Steve Blank, 1999 Hypotheses Test Insight Design Experiment #5 Lean Startup
  43. 43. Key Principles #5 Lean Startup search execu&on uncertainty test most cri>cal assump>ons first use quick and cheap experiments first $ $ $ $ $ $ spending Alexander Osterwalder, 2016
  44. 44. Investment Readiness Level Steve Blank, 2013 Based on NASA/DOD Technology Readiness Level #5 Lean Startup 9. Metrics that MaWer 8. Validate Value Delivery (Le side of Canvas) 7. Prototype High-Fidelity Min. Viable Product 6. Validate Revenue Model (Right side of Canvas) 5. Validate Product / Market Fit 4. Prototype Low-Fidelity Min. Viable Product 3. Problem / Solu&on Valida&on 2. Market Size / Compe&&ve Analysis 1. Complete First-Pass Business Model Canvas
  45. 45. Created a key distinction between established organizations and startups: execution vs discovery. Expanded the model by applying it to universities where students use it, private firms and governmental institutions. It is now used both by startups and big companies. Key Contributions 1 2 Offers a tool set to move through uncertainty faster, while trying to create value from ideas. Analogue to what we have for execution, but focused on testing unproven ideas through experimentation. Key for addressing Horizon 2 and Horizon 3 Innovations. 3 Before investing heavily, we need to actively learn, change and refine ideas, until we have a model that works. Innovation without execution is hallucination. But if we start by executing, without validation, we end up investing too much time, energy and money in ideas that won’t make it to the finish line. Customer Centricity #5 Lean Startup
  46. 46. Digital transformation? Organizations as communities & networks #6 Net-Working and Communities
  47. 47. We think about organizations mostly from the hierarchical, functional or processual perspectives. This is “myopic”, at least. Our interventions need a better understanding about what we are dealing with and cannot be designed considering only the tip of the iceberg. 1 2 3 There’s a lack of shared organizational awareness, which is key for collective action and innovation. We need to enable connections between people and ideas to foster innovation. Well intended interventions destroy “social” and “informal” structures, when trying to capture their value. #6 Net-Working and Communities 3 Key Problems
  48. 48. Designing for Communities 
 and Networking #6 Net-Working and Communities INFORMAL VIEW FORMAL
 VIEW Inspired by: Practice-based approaches in organizational studies and interventions Lave, Orr, Guerardi, Orlikowski, Duguid, Brown Organizations seen through the 
 practice lens: Communities and Networks
  49. 49. Key Contributions 1 2 The learning unit in organizations is not the individual. It is a group, formal or informal, such as a team or a community. This is key for our understanding and the design of prolific interventions. Team work. 3 Instead of thinking about knowledge and innovation as nouns, we need to consider them as continuous practices: knowing and innovating. The end-goal is knowledge-ability: improving capacity for action, through knowing-in-practice. Designing for Communities and Net-Working Informal structures are the organizational ‘glue’. To improve work, the workplace, and to empower professionals, we need to understand and design for both the formal and the informal dynamic structures: networks, communities and practices. #6 Net-Working and Communities
  50. 50. How do we make sense of the world to act in it? Together! #7 Sense-Making
  51. 51. We all strive to make sense of what is effective action. Though well intentioned, we are ‘hostages’ of our mental models. 1 2 Conforming all ideas, problems or opportunities to the same approach is like trying to hammer a screw into a wall. We all have been there and know the end result: catastrophic failure. 3 Over 80% of innovation projects fail. Most innovation programs and processes are designed with an illusory ‘safe-fail’ approach, as if they were mere obvious questions just waiting to be executed. #7 Sense-Making 3 Key Problems
  52. 52. Cynefin (ku-nevin) making framework basic types of system: ex and chaotic. ms have propensities ns but no linear material ement and outcome nly work in the ordered roduce perverse e complex domain er is divided into mplicated and the fifth der orld we focus on ltiple parallel safe-to-fail ot one fail-safe design Complicated Governing constraints sense-analyse-respond Good Practice Obvious Rigid constraints sense-categorise-respond Best Practice Chaotic Absence of constraints act-sense-respond Novel Practice Complex Enabling constraints probe-sense-respond Emergent Practice Sense-making framework #7 Sense-Making by: Dave Snowden and Cynthia Kurtz, 2003 Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Edge. 
 
 US Pat. 8,031,201
  53. 53. #7 Sense-Making
  54. 54. It helps to move from ‘fail-safe’ idealist approaches, to ‘safe-to-fail’ experimentation, which is imperative to address innovation. Failure is not the new success. Key Contributions 1 2 Cynefin is useful both for diagnostic and guiding action. It provides an actionable approach to address problems in each type of system: ordered (simple or complicated), complex and chaotic. 3 Problems and opportunities need to be addressed with different strategies, depending on their nature. The first step towards success is to understand what’s the context and the domain we are working in. Collective Sense-Making #7 Sense-Making
  55. 55. 7 Days. Models. Challenges.
  56. 56. So, what can you do tomorrow? Think of a conversa>on in a situa>on, project or problem where there were some thoughts or feelings that were not communicated. Split a piece of paper into two columns. Write down what was actually said on the right column and thoughts and feelings that you didn’t communicate on the leE column. AEerwords, analyze it using Model I and Model II. Thoughts and Feelings 
 Not Communicated Actual 
 Conversation He’s not going to like this topic, but we have to discuss it. I doubt that he will take a company perspective, but I should remain positive. I: Hi, Bill, I appreciate the opportunity to talk with you about this problem of customer service versus product. I am sure that both of us want to resolve it in the best interest of the company. Bill: I am glad to talk about it, as you know. I had better go slow. Let me ease in. I: There is an increasing number of situations where our clients are asking for customer service and rejecting off-the- shelf products. My fear is that your salespeople will play an increasingly peripheral role in the future. Bill: I don’t understand. Tell me more. Of course you understand! I wish there was a way I could be more gentle. I: Bill, I’m sure you are aware of the changes [and explains] Bill: No, I do not see it that way. It’s my salespeople that are the key to the future. There he goes again, thinking as a salesman and not as a corporate officer. I: Well, let’s explore that a bit… EXAMPLE #1 Organizational Learning
  57. 57. So, what can you do tomorrow? • Think about a planned change in your life that you couldn’t realize as intended. 
 What emerged? • Think about an unplanned and positive change in your life that you were not expecting. 
 How did it happen? Did you make the most of it? #2 Organizational Change
  58. 58. So, what can you do tomorrow? #1 - Individual Perspective Think about your career and personal development in three curves. The past, the present and the future, to understand what was your journey so far, where do you stand today and when it will be time for big changes. #2 - Company Perspective Consider the 3 Horizons of Growth and make a 3 column table: Improve, Expand, Explore. List your innovation programs and projects. Assess your portfolio. IMPROVE (Horizon 1) EXTEND (Horizon 2) EXPLORE (Horizon 3) Initiative A Program B Initiative C Program D #3 Organizational Innovation
  59. 59. So, what can you do tomorrow? Create a
 personal Business Model You #4 Value Proposition Design
  60. 60. So, what can you do tomorrow? Validate your “Business Model You” model by iterating it with your ‘customers’ (colleagues, family, friends). Be aware that they may be using defensive behaviours from Model I. In order to truly validate it, ask for an example of how it happened for each item being addressed. Also, remember that this is not just to validate your initial hypothesis. It is simultaneously a discovery process. Be on the lookout to find things you didn’t consider. #5 Lean Startup
  61. 61. So, what can you do tomorrow? Overtime we learn we rewire our brain through 
 new, improved or disrupted connections. Think about professional connections that are new, 
 have become stronger, or have been disrupted. Can you think of groups of people you work regularly 
 that are not part of the formal hierarchy but are 
 indispensable to get things done? #6 Net-Working and Communities
  62. 62. So, what can you do tomorrow? Think about a decision and the way you’ve addressed a problem on the complex 
 domain that had a bad outcome. Now, and with the benefit of hindsight what would you have done differently? Tip: design an action plan using experimentation 
 ‘probe-sense-respond’ model of the complex domain #7 Sense-Making
  63. 63. “Quotebook”
  64. 64. Organizational Learning “Not that profit and product are no longer important but without continuing learning, they will no longer be possible” – Harrison Owen #1 Organizational Learning
  65. 65. Organizational Change “The things we fear most in organizations - fluctuations, disturbances, imbalances - are the primary sources of creativity” – Margaret Wheatley #2 Organizational Change
  66. 66. Organizational Innovation “Creativity is thinking up new things. Innovation is doing new things.” – Theodore Levitt #3 Organizational Innovation
  67. 67. Value Proposition Design "You have to start with the customer experience and work backwards to the technology” – Steve Jobs #4 Value Proposition Design
  68. 68. Lean Startup “Innovation projects are like flower bulbs. You never know which ones will pop up as beautiful flower.“ – Gijs van Wulfen #5 Lean Startup
  69. 69. Net-Work and Communities “Collaboration is an organizational imperative of 21st century. Networks of relationships are the ultimate resource.” - Patti Anklam #6 Net-Working and Communities
  70. 70. Collective Sense-Making "However beautiful the strategy, you should occasionally look at the results." - Winston Churchill #7 Sense-Making
  71. 71. I look forward to hearing from you www.innovationcast.com | carlos.mendes@innovationcast.com
  72. 72. innovationcast® SOON, THERE WILL ONLY BE ONE 
 TYPE OF COMPANY innovationcast®
  73. 73. innovationcast® COMPANIES THAT 
 DRIVE GROWTH THROUGH INNOVATION
  74. 74. innovationcast® 82 Growth through innova>on management. OUR VALUE PROPOSITION prolific Your Innova&on Opera&ng System Become be.er at what you do today, and keep discovering new direc>ons to venture. How? 1. Open 2. Collabora>ve 3. End-to-end
  75. 75. innovationcast® innovationcast® Leading-edge Innova>on Management SoEware The game will keep changing. Do you want to stay ahead?

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