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Sand, c.k., 2018. sustainable packaging and its role in reducing food waste. iu fost, mumbai, october 2018

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With 30 years of experience across the food science and packaging spectrum, Dr Claire Sand through her company, Packaging Technology & Research, offers clients solutions using Strategy, Technology, Consulting and Coaching. ​



Want to know more about how this article affect your business? Reach out to Dr Sand on Linked In - https://www.linkedin.com/in/clairekoelschsand



Want to keep learning from Dr. Sand? View more of her presentations and articles at http://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/thought-leadership.html

Dr. Claire Sand | Owner, Packaging Technology & Research, LLC; Adjunct Professor, Michigan State University; Columnist for Food Technology Magazine

http://www.packagingtechnologyandresearch.com/

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Sand, c.k., 2018. sustainable packaging and its role in reducing food waste. iu fost, mumbai, october 2018

  1. 1. Created by PTR Learn more at: www.PackagingTechnologyAndResearch.com SUSTAINABLE PACKAGING THAT REDUCES FOOD WASTE October 2018
  2. 2. Topline IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 2 VALUE CHAIN – INTELLIGENT PACKAGING WHY A SYSTEMS APPROACH IS NEEDED VALUE CHAIN – DESIGN VALUE CHAIN – BIODERIVED AND OR LESS OF BOTH
  3. 3. PTR Perspective: Perspective and trends that prompt change IUFoST 3Claire Sand, PTR
  4. 4. PTR Perspective | Packaging value chain approach Blend science with solutions in the value chain for a sustainable competitive edge IUFoST 4Claire Sand, PTR
  5. 5. PTR Perspective | Packaging can change lives Packaging can be sustainable, affordable and convenient Packaging can enable affordable healthy food choices Packaging needs to leapfrog technically and in the value chain IUFoST 5Claire Sand, PTR
  6. 6. PTR Perspective | We can do better IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 6
  7. 7. PTR Perspective | We need to get unstuck • Delivering sustainable packaging and protecting food to avoid food waste is a balancing act that was a bit askew and is recalibrating with much promise • In the past, new packaging materials and lightweighting were used as “drop-in” solutions so that the same processes – manufacturing, distribution, retail, consumer use and package disposal – were used with minimal disruption • This approach severely limited solutions including packaging materials • Now, unsurprisingly, sustainability and food waste goals are not attainable with these same solutions. • Disruption and agility in the value chain are needed to both enable the use of more sustainable packaging and decrease food waste significantly IUFoST 7Claire Sand, PTR
  8. 8. PTR Perspective | There is hope • Meaningful increases in sustainable packaging and decreases in food waste are attainable by reconsidering the value chain processes that define how food goes from farm to fork • Value chain agility allows sustainable packaging goals and reductions in food waste to be achieved • This disruption creates new opportunities to use more sustainable packaging materials/systems to and achieve food waste goals IUFoST 8Claire Sand, PTR
  9. 9. PTR Perspective | There is alignment IUFoST 9 While not viable in the past, sustainable packaging that reduces food waste is in harmony with: Claire Sand, PTR Urbanization Retail environment shifts Understanding of food insecurity impact Circular economy opportunities
  10. 10. Causes/ Categories Category Z Category Y Category X Catgeory W Category V Category U Category T Category S Oxidation Moisture Change Microbial Browning Water resistance MVTR Antimicrobial Reduce impact of contamin. ingredients Reduce contamin. during product fill Assess initial microbial load Reduce initial microbial load Reduce cross contamin. Enable processing of some ingredients Enable HACCP Address chilled worker conditions Time &Temp monitoring system Oxygen level monitoring system Control tempertaure Measure microbial load at POS Enable safe package reuse Reduce consumer contamin. from repeat use Expand time for safe product use Enable oven/ MWmonitoring Address eating hygiene through packaging Enable freezer storage Packagingand Handling Pkg Prop. Product Degradation Causes Distributio n&Retail ConsumerUse Value Chain Opportunities IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 10
  11. 11. Scalable 1 Time-Temperature indicators (TTI) Scalable 2 Flex-Pack Scalable 3 O2 absorbing sachets, CO2 emitters and MAP Pilot 1 Consumer Within (CWI) via Time-Temperature Indicators (TTI) Pilot 2 Edible antimicrobials Pilot 3 Compostable polymers with industrial composting Research 1 Sustainably sourced bioderived recyclable polymers Research 2 CWI via O2 Sensors Research 3 CWI via pH Sensors System 1 SPC labeling to increase sorting and collection System 2 Improved systems for collection, sorting, processing of recyclables reusables, and compostables System 3 Integrated IoT/IoP with CWI & packaging disposal directions Reduced Food Waste Solution Sustainability Solution Supermarket Food Waste Reduced as a function of Feasibility IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 11 Value Chain Opportunities
  12. 12. DESIGN -FOR THE ENTIRE VALUE CHAIN • Post-consumer value can be added to packaging through packaging that is clearly recycle-ready by consumers and recyclers • Separate needs IUFoST 12Claire Sand, PTR
  13. 13. • INCORPORATION OF NANO PARTICLES • SINGLE POLYMER COMPOSITE STRUCTURE WITH NAN O FIBERS • SINGLE POLYMER COMPOSITE STRUCTURE SELF REINFORCED COMPOSITES • SHDPE = BI-MODAL HDPE Design for the value chain IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 13 • CHEMICALLY RECYCLABLE POLYMERS • CONSUMER SEPARABLE - DESIGN - FEATURES • REVERSIBLE ADHESIVE FOR INDUSTRIAL SEPARATION • POLYMER COMPATABILIZER • CONSUMER DEFINED PACKAGING • MINIMAL CONSUMER PACKAGING- MASTERPACKS
  14. 14. How it Works Opportunity • Consumer – intuitively or visually – separable packaging • Redesign packaging to allow mechanical and structural support to be separated from barriers • Functional layers do not need to be tied together to be functional • Cost effective use of materials allows for thicker separable layers of fully recyclable polymers (PET sheet) vs. thin layers of aluminum foil that cannot be separated from base stock • Enable benefits from consumer recycling direction CONSUMER SEPARABLE - DESIGN - FEATURES IUFoST 14Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: SYSTEMS
  15. 15. CHEMICALLY RECYCLABLE POLYMERS PET - viable chemical recycling methods include: • Energy intensive hydrolysis (using bases, acids and water) in which thermophilic hydrolase actively degrades polyesters containing aromatic constituents • Alcoholysis (using alcohols) • Glycolysis (using glycols) • Aminolysis (using amines) via aminolysis to poly (aryl ether sulfone-amide) results in a new value-added polymeric material Polyethylenes - viable chemical recycling methods includes: • Chemical recycling via cross alkane metathesis (CAM) processing converts PE and other polyolefins into liquid fuels such as diesel and waxes How it Works Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: SYSTEMS
  16. 16. How it Works Opportunity • Polymers easily separated and recycled through the use of low cost non-covalent interactions of reversible adhesives • Supramolecular reversible adhesives such as PVP/PEG-400 produced by 0f poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidone) (PVP) and PEG-400 which serves as a • Difunctional supramolecular cross-linker that bridges the carbonyl groups of PVP chains via hydrogen bonding • Replace existing adhesive within laminates REVERSIBLE ADHESIVE FOR INDUSTRIAL SEPARATION IUFoST 16 • Suprapolix • Bostik • Arkema • WO2011015773A2, 2011 • CA2740089A1, 2011 • WO2009150328A2, 2009 Partners Intellectual Property Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: SYSTEMS
  17. 17. How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Alliances with • Major polymer source manufacturers • EuCertPlast • RecyClass • European Association of Plastic Recycling and Recovery Organizations (EPRO) • Ioniqa Technologies for technology on uniform quality standards in the use of plastic materials and design for recycling • Advocate for polymer compatibilizers to enable recycling of multilayer structures • Build on advances from EVOH- LDPE compatibilizers • PP-PE compatibilzer is in development • Need driven research requires industry pull POLYMER COMPATIBILIZER Where Work is Happening/Partners IUFoST 17Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: SYSTEMS
  18. 18. How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Embedded within film solutions to attain high barrier films • To reduce enable agglomeration and settling of nanocomposites, multiple setup processing and additives have been employed and this has increased cost and limits level of nanocomposites • This new process allows for ~25% by volume of nanocomposites • And, allows for a platform polymer with variable permeability as a function of the nanocomposite concentration as well as the use on paper creating a rapidly separable 2- component polymer-paper high barrier structure • Recyclable single layer high barrier films • This also can be applied to improving the strength of hydrogels and thin films • Volumes to drive production • Cost vs. multilayer films • Facilitate recycling of films or separation from paperboard INCORPORATION OF NANO PARTICLES IUFoST 18Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: MATERIAL SCIENCE
  19. 19. • Nanofiber-SPC (single polymer composites) • One structure with nanovariants with higher order to improve barrier properties and enable recycling How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Replace laminate and structures with nanofibers of same material • Adding innovation on nanoscale has much promise • Produced in the same manner as SPCs • Value chain shift from converters to optimizer of existing polymer SINGLE POLYMER COMPOSITE STRUCTURE WITH NANOFIBERS IUFoST 19 Single polymer composite structure with nanofibers Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain RECYCLE-READY: MATERIAL SCIENCE
  20. 20. IUFoSTClaire Sand, PTR 20 Minimize Retail Packaging – Consumer Defined Packaging
  21. 21. How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Manufacturers separate consumer and manufacturer to retailer packaging from consumer packaging • Consumer select amount needed and package product in store • Consumers receive less packaging • Lower cost primary packaging • Potentially returnable tertiary packaging • Potentially more recyclable packaging • Longer shelf life • Shifted emphasis to master packs as barrier • Supply chain reusable packaging CONSUMER DEFINED PACKAGING IN STORE • Retailers • Supply Chain innovators • Recyclers Partners IUFoST 21Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain MINIMIZE RETAIL PACKAGING
  22. 22. How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Manufacturers separate consumer and manufacturer to retailer packaging from consumer packaging • Consumer select amount needed and package product in store • Less packaging for consumer to dispose • Packaging defined by store/region based on what can be recycled • Consumers receive less packaging • Lower cost primary packaging • Potentially returnable tertiary packaging • Potentially more recyclable primary packaging • Longer shelf life from manufacturer to retailer • Smaller retail package sizes • Less food waste • Distribution • Innovations in package design needed • Value chain • Retailers • Supply Chain innovators • Recyclers • Candy • Produce • Bulk foods Partners IUFoST 22 CONSUMER DEFINED PACKAGING IN STORE Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain MINIMIZE RETAIL PACKAGING
  23. 23. How it Works Opportunity Impediments • Manufacturers separate consumer and manufacturer to retailer packaging from consumer packaging • High barrier retail packs opened when product is placed on store shelves or shipped • Packaging for consumer focuses on shelf life needed by consumer versus entire supply chain • Less packaging for consumer to dispose • Consumers receive less packaging • Lower cost primary packaging • Potentially returnable tertiary packaging • Potentially more recyclable primary packaging • Longer shelf life from manufacturer to retailer • Smaller retail package sizes • Less food waste • Shifted emphasis to master packs as barrier • Supply chain reusable packaging • Retail labor MINIMAL CONSUMER PACKAGING- MASTERPACKS • Retailers • Supply Chain innovators • Recyclers • Meat packaging • DSD Partners IUFoST 23Claire Sand, PTR Value Chain MINIMIZE RETAIL PACKAGING
  24. 24. * Values are given at sale in thousands $796,708 $2,154 $23,510 $294,043 $112,972 $81,406 $72,986 $366,369 $1,217 MINIMAL CONSUMER PACKAGING- FLEX AND MASTERPACKS • High barrier retail packaging opened when product is placed on store shelves or shipped • Reduced required for primary packaging • Less packaging for consumer to dispose Value Chain MINIMIZE RETAIL PACKAGING
  25. 25. TO RECAP: Topline IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 25 VALUE CHAIN – MINIMIZE RETAIL PACKAGING PERSPECTIVE AND TRENDS THAT PROMPT CHANGE VALUE CHAIN – RECYCLE READY VALUE CHAIN – MOBILE FOOD ACQUISITION OR LESS OF BOTH
  26. 26. Checklist IUFoST Claire Sand, PTR 26 Design • Post-consumer value can be added to packaging through packaging that is clearly recycle-ready by consumers and recyclers • Technologies are not complex but require value chain management and innovation • Design solutions offer IP opportunities in design • Switch from current converting processes to more high-tech film forming processes • Materials represent single layer construction for rapid recycling by consumers and industrial environments • Reuse of secondary packaging can be coupled with less primary packaging • Link Delivery systems innovation to consumer defined packaging
  27. 27. Questions? Please ask! Dr. Claire Sand, Owner and Founder Packaging Technology & Research, LLC. Offering food science and packaging expertise in: • Coaching • Consulting • Technology • Strategy www.PackagingTechnologyandResearch.com claire@packagingtechnologyandresearch.com +1 612-807-5341 IUFoST 27Claire Sand, PTR

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