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Multiracial 101 presentation 2014

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Multiracial 101 presentation 2014

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Presentation at Washington State's 24th Annual Students of Color Conference. This workshop was geared for students who wanted to learn about another cultural group other than their own.

Presentation at Washington State's 24th Annual Students of Color Conference. This workshop was geared for students who wanted to learn about another cultural group other than their own.

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Multiracial 101 presentation 2014

  1. 1. MULTIRACIAL 101 By: Chanda Ishisaka
  2. 2. A little bit about the presenter: Chanda Ishisaka  Japanese (father) and Mexican (mother) Picture: graduation with family 1st Row (L to R): Sister, Chanda, Mom, Second Cousin, Second Cousin 2nd Row: Dad, Brother, Cousin’s partner
  3. 3. Learning Outcomes 1. Learn the historical, social and current context of multiracial people 2. Students will discuss their views about multiracial people 3. Students will learn how they can be an ally to multiracial people 4. For you to understand that race is a social construct and is always changing.
  4. 4. Presenter notes:  We are focusing on the biracial/multiracial individual and not the interracial couple or individual in an interracial relationship.  This presentation will focus predominately to race and multiracial people in the United States.  This workshop is just the beginning – continue to learn and talk about this issue.
  5. 5. Outline  Ice Breaker  History  Contemporary Views  Identity development  Discussion  Being an ally
  6. 6. Ice breaker Turn to your person next to you, exchange names, what school you are from, and ask the person, “What are you?”
  7. 7. 16 Things You Should Never Say to Mixed Race People http://youtu.be/mqHf9ZayI8Y
  8. 8. Multiracial  Multiracial refers to people who are of two or more racial heritages. It is the most inclusive term to refer to people across all racial mixes. It also includes biracial people.  Mixed Race refers to people who are two or more racial heritages. Image: Time Magazine Special Issues “The New Face of America” Nov. 18, 1993. Highlighting the growing immigrant population and multiracial population will change the look of our future.
  9. 9. Group Discussion 1. Get in your identity group from yesterday 2. Discuss and answer the following questions: 1. Language: What did you call mixed people in your community? 2. Historically, how has your community treated and viewed mixed people? 3. Afterward, one person will report out to the larger group.
  10. 10. Definitions over time Historical background
  11. 11. Race has always played a role in U.S. history and laws • Legally sanctioned forms of discrimination have been used to define and defend Whiteness by creating clear distinctions between White people and all others (Dalmage, H., 2003).
  12. 12. One-drop Rule – classifying Black  Historical term in the United States for the social classification as Black of individuals with any African ancestry  Meaning any person with “one drop of black blood” was considered Black.  Recorded as early as 1661 in Maryland  Derived from Southern slave culture, and aftermath of the American Civil War, emancipation of slaves, and Reconstruction.
  13. 13. Blood Quantum – classifying Native Americans  Started in 1705  Used primarily to establish the fraction of Native or Aboriginal heritage that a tribe may require for membership.  Government’s need for definition and restriction of tribal growth. Members of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in Oklahoma around 1877, including some with European and African ancestry. Source: Charles Hudson, The Southeastern Indians, 1976. Image: Members of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation in Oklahoma around 1877, including some with European and African ancestry.
  14. 14. What are Anti- Miscegenation laws?
  15. 15. Anti-miscegenation marriage laws  State laws passed by individual states to criminalize interracial marriage.  First laws go back to the colonial era- 1664  Originally intended for Whites marrying Black but then opened up to Whites marrying other races
  16. 16. Anti-miscegenation laws in 1940 Source: Loving Day, http://www.lovingday.org/legal-map
  17. 17. 1967- Interracial marriage is made legal
  18. 18. Loving v. Virginia Case 1967 U.S. Supreme Court case ended all race-based legal restrictions on marriage Image: Mildred and Richard Loving in 1967 Source: Wikipedia
  19. 19. “I am living social justice through creative resistance” Post -1967 Loving Case
  20. 20. Multiracial history timeline 1967: Loving v. Virginia case Post-1967:  Interracial couples started advocating for their families  Multiracial groups formed  Multiracial Student clubs organized  Multiracial groups lobbied to the Census to start a multiracial category  Academia in mixed race emerges 2000 Census acknowledges mixed people  Growing community of artists and representation in media  Growing community of mixed people and expression of identity
  21. 21. The Hapa Project by Kip Fulbeck
  22. 22. 2000 was the first time the Census allowed people to select more than one race
  23. 23. Census Data 2000 2010 Number Percentage Number Percentage 6.8 mil 2.4 9 mil 2.9 2010 Census for Washington: 4.7% percent of the population identified at two or more races, or 312,926 people.
  24. 24. Southern California Multiracial Families create their own Cheerios ‘ads’
  25. 25. Every community has mixed people Barack Obama- Black and White Dwayne Johnson “The Rock” Samoan and African Canadian Benjamin Bratt- Peruvian & White Steve Jobs- White & Lebanese Nicki Minaj Afro-Trinidadian & Eastern Indian Kimora Lee- Black, Korean, Japanese Kid Cudi- Black and Mexican Nicole Scherzinger Filipino, Hawaiian, Russian
  26. 26. Mixed People Exist in all Communities Largest Multiple-Race combinations in the United States in 2010: • White and Black • White and Some Other Race • White and Asian • White and American Indian and Alaskan Native 2.9 3.2 7.4 43.8 15.3 55.9 12.1 Total Population White Black or African American American Indian and Alaska Native Asian Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander Some Other Race Percentage of Major Races Groups Reporting Multiple Races: 2010
  27. 27. Contemporary perspective of multiracial people
  28. 28. Group discussion: 1. Perceptions and Stereotypes: How did people in your community view mixed people? 2. Experience: What experiences do you think mixed people had in your community?
  29. 29. Problematic Attitudes Others Have Made towards Mixed People  Animosity/Resentment  “Just choose one!”  “Just be what you look like!”  Glorifying/Exotified  “Mixed people are more attractive”  “Mixed people get the best of both worlds”  “A symbol of progress - The end of racism”  Disbelief  “What?! You are really ----?”  “Wow! Your mom really is -----.”  Pity  “Tragic mulatto”  “War babies”
  30. 30. Multiracial People’s Responses to Perceptions of Others  Feeling Racially Inadequate  “I’m Not _____ Enough”  Internalized shame  Always an outsider  Not feeling welcomed in student/community groups  Embracing exotification  Internalized oppression  Ignoring race  Avoiding confrontation about race  Pride  Giving voice to the mixed race experience
  31. 31. White Privilege White privilege may come up for multiracial people “I resented that I could easily ‘pass’ as White. I would do anything to be brown like my brother, sister, mother, and friends. I am aware of the implications of the White privilege I experience on a daily basis. However, I also recognize the unique experience and perspective that I have as a mixed race Latina.” -(Janiva Cifuentes-Hiss, age: 19, Ethnic Heritage: Columbian and Irish)
  32. 32. Identity
  33. 33. Video Clip: Being Multiracial Documentary http://youtu.be/BtWgl1qF3Y0
  34. 34. Five types of identity resolution (Maria Root, 1990) Accept the monoracial identity society assigns (i.e. the “one drop” rule) Actively choose a monoracial (minority) identity Define self as biracial or multiracial Develop a new race identity (not fractioning oneself into parts, but seeing self as something new altogether). Symbolic race, the declaration of a white identity with attachment AND detachment from one’s heritage of color
  35. 35. Ecological Framework for Understanding Racial Identity (Maria Root, 2003) Background “Invisible” Context • Regional and generational history of race and ethnic relations • Gender and sexual orientation • Class Family Functioning - Family Socialization - Child’s Traits and Aptitudes Identities - Ethnicities - Races Community Attitudes & Racial Socialization Physical Appearance
  36. 36. Discussion Activity: Facilitated Discussion  Break into groups  Discuss questions
  37. 37. Becoming an ally
  38. 38. Ways to Support Multiracial Students  Advocate for multiracial issues  Access your own racial identity and personal biases about multiracial identity  Understand how your identity may be perceived by others  Create opportunities for dialogue  Help students to understand the differences among race, ethnicity, and culture.  Think about how you can include multiracial issues/people into your community
  39. 39. Activity: Pledge Card
  40. 40. Questions

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