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USA Backlash against Anti-Immigration

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USA Backlash against Anti-Immigration

  1. 1. The millennium prayers
  2. 2. USA
  3. 3. The Liberty
  4. 4. . The Immigration
  5. 5. The Immigrants
  6. 6. USA The Backlash against "Immigrants” Is Offensive and absurd -- We're All Immigrants- by James Robinson, 2010
  7. 7. Backlash (bakˌlash) a strong and adverse reaction by a large number of people, especially to a social or political development. "a public backlash against racism“ synonyms: adverse reaction, adverse response, counterblast, comeback, repercussion;
  8. 8. History In 400 years ago the first of four major immigration waves hit the shores of what later came to be known as the United States of America. These early immigrants (aka Colonists) were almost all from the islands comprising the United Kingdom, with a smattering from the Continent itself:  Denmark,  Finland, France
  9. 9. By 1700, approximately 250,000 immigrants inhabited the Colonies  By 1775 another 500,000 people had made the treacherous crossing.  French, German, Irish, Italian and Scottish escaping conflict and oppression made their way here.
  10. 10. Europe  Germany,  Italy, The Netherlands, Poland, Portugal,  Scotland, Sweden, Wales, and Finland).
  11. 11. THE SALAD BOWL An American historian, Frederick Jackson Turner, once said that the United States ought to be described as a salad bowl rather than a melting pot. Americans get mixed together like leaves in a salad bowl, by remaining distinct.
  12. 12. SALAD IN A BOWL
  13. 13. THE EARLY IMMIGRANT BACKLASH The flood of immigrants alarmed many 'native- born' Americans, who were often only a generation removed from their own immigrant roots. Some feared job competition; others disliked the religion, politics or ethnicity of the newcomers. During the 1850's, the "America Party" (aka the Know-Nothing Party) demanded laws to reduce immigration and to make it harder for foreigners to become citizens.
  14. 14. First anti-immigrant law The first anti-immigrant law, passed in California, targeted the Chinese. In 1882, the US passed the Chinese Exclusion Act, which was not repealed until 1943.  Even then, immigration quotas for Chinese were only raised above 105 per year by the Civil Rights Act of 1964.  The late 1800s were difficult for Chinese in the US--the growing trade union movement based part of its organizing strategy on advocating deportation of Chinese immigrants. Race riots on the West coast were the response of angry whites who blamed Chinese for their woes.
  15. 15. The Chinese
  16. 16. The Contemporary Anti-Immigrant Campaign The 1965 law states that 20 percent of all numerically restricted visas will be allocated for skilled workers and 6 percent for refugees, with the remainder split among various family-oriented preference categories. Importantly, spouses, dependent children, and parents of US citizens were exempted from any numerical limits. It is this provision that particularly drew the wrath of the right.
  17. 17. The Contemporary Anti-Immigrant Campaign In the 1980s, anti-immigrant sentiment grew during the debate over immigration reform. Supporters of the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986 argued that immigrants were stealing jobs and draining the economy, and that political turmoil in Mexico and Central America would spill over into the US. Defenders of immigrants argued that immigrants are, in fact, a positive force in the American workforce and that the US is historically a nation of immigrants.
  18. 18. The Immigration Act of 1990  Reaffirmed the centrality of family reunification, which has been the touchstone of US immigration policy since 1965. However, the concept of family reunification is now under attack.
  19. 19. THE FINAL LAW Authored by Senator Alan Simpson (R- Wyoming) and Representative Romano Mazzoli (D-Kentucky), and promoted by the Reagan White House, was intended to shut the door on the further flow of illegal immigrants, while ostensibly supporting immigrants by offering "legalized" status to undocumented immigrants already in the US.
  20. 20. AMERICANS’ OBSESSION To save our country and our jobs, we need to close down our borders and keep out "immigrants."
  21. 21. The Atlantic Monthly Article: Quotes directly from The Camp of the Saints, a copy of which describes the masses threatening the white, and naturally civilized world as: "All the kinky-haired, swarthy-skinned, long-despised phantoms; all the teeming ants toiling for the white man's comfort; all the swill men and sweepers, the troglodytes, the stinking drudges, the swivel- hipped menials, the women less wretches, the lung-spewing hackers. . . . "These "five billion growling human beings" are threatening the "seven hundred million whites."
  22. 22. Is Illegal Immigration an Economic Burden to America? (Pros/Yes) "In 2010, the average unlawful immigrant household received around $24,721 in government benefits and services while paying some $10,334 in taxes. This generated an average annual fiscal deficit (benefits received minus taxes paid) of around $14,387 per household. This cost had to be borne by U.S. taxpayers... Under current law, all unlawful immigrant households together have an aggregate annual deficit of around $54.5 billion.“ Robert Rector, MA, Senior Research Fellow in Domestic Policy at the Heritage Foundation, and Jason Richwine, PhD, Senior Policy Analyst for the Center for Data Analysis at the Heritage Foundation (at the time of the quote) in their May 6, 2013
  23. 23. Is Illegal Immigration an Economic Burden to America? (Cons/No) "Many undocumented immigrants pay taxes, use government services and collect benefits. Most importantly, undocumented immigrants contribute to the economy. Labor economists agree that there are net gains to having a larger labor supply. Some groups benefit more than others do - and some may even be hurt by the millions of undocumented immigrants.  In 2012, researchers at the Cato Institute estimated that a mass deportations policy would reduce economic growth by around $250 billion per year. Those costs would not be evenly distributed: Those at the very bottom of the income distribution, particularly those without a high school diploma, may even earn higher wages in the absence of undocumented immigrants. But in total,
  24. 24. Reference/s: The Backlash against "Immigrants” Is Offensive and absurd -- We're All Immigrants- by James Robinson, 2010 Pulling up the Ladder -The Anti-Immigrant Backlash by Doug Brugge The Daily Conversation – History of USA Immigration

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