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Online Fundraising 101 - BCNPHA Conference

Before you get started fundraising, you need to understand donors - why they do or do not give. Then using stories to connect and communicate - online and offline. Once that is in place, leveraging the cost effective, high learning, easy to spread nature of online to infuse your fundraising becomes easier.

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Online Fundraising 101 - BCNPHA Conference

  1. 1. gofundme.com/2am4q7kk A story.
  2. 2. Antonio Perez / Chicago Tribune
  3. 3. gofundme.com/2am4q7kk
  4. 4. It’s a new, (more) democratic, and (still) early era of fundraising.
  5. 5. gofundme.com/2am4q7kk
  6. 6. Your website, and online fundraising, isn’t just about revenue.
  7. 7. Today, Housekeeping & Agenda ● Will send out slides ● Write things down. Write everything down. ○ Get 3 6 concrete things ● Contact ○ brady@shiftcharity.com, @bradyjosephson ● Agenda ○ Part I - Giving & Fundraising ○ Part II - Storytelling & Communications ○ Break ○ Part III - Digital & Online Fundraising ○ Part IV - Case Study & Examples ○ Part V - Interview & Discussion ○ Part VI - Q & A & Q & A
  8. 8. To fundraise, you have to understand why people give. Or at least try.
  9. 9. We are wired for giving.
  10. 10. Science Magazine
  11. 11. Happify
  12. 12. Happify
  13. 13. Giving gives us pleasure. Giving makes us happy. Giving helps us be healthy.
  14. 14. Don’t be afraid to ask people to give! To fundraise.
  15. 15. Why do you give?
  16. 16. Framework Copyright MECLABS, Courtesy of NextAfter
  17. 17. Your Value Proposition + Why People Give - Why People Don’t Give = Fundraising
  18. 18. Joseph Mixer Why People Give Internal Personal or “I” Factors ● Acceptance, guilt reduction, meaning/purpose, spirituality, survival Social or “We” Factors ● Status, altruism, power, family, interdependence Negative or “They” Factors ● Frustration, fear/anxiety, complexity External Rewards ● Recognition, personal, social Stimulations ● Human needs, personal request, vision, efficiency/effectiveness, tax deductions Situations ● Involvement, peer pressure, culture, tradition, role identity, disposable income
  19. 19. Joseph Mixer Why People Give Internal Personal or “I” Factors ● Acceptance, guilt reduction, meaning/purpose, spirituality, survival Social or “We” Factors ● Status, altruism, power, family, interdependence Negative or “They” Factors ● Frustration, fear/anxiety, complexity External Rewards ● Recognition, personal, social Stimulations ● Human needs, personal request, vision, efficiency/effectiveness, tax deductions Situations ● Involvement, peer pressure, culture, tradition, role identity, disposable income
  20. 20. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  21. 21. Millennials.
  22. 22. Millennial Giving Characteristics ● Want to be more involved and included ● Want to use social influence and time ● Want to trust in the causes they support ● Want to give (time and money) with peers ● Want to see clear examples of how they are making a difference by giving (time and money) ● Want to get something back for their giving (impact, access, prestige, etc.) ● Want to support more organizations, and friends, in smaller amounts
  23. 23. Millennial Giving Characteristics ● Want to be more involved and included ● Want to use social influence and time ● Want to trust in the causes they support ● Want to give (time and money) with peers ● Want to see clear examples of how they are making a difference by giving (time and money) ● Want to get something back for their giving (impact, access, prestige, etc.) ● Want to support more organizations, and friends, in smaller amounts
  24. 24. Millennial Giving Characteristics ● Want to be more involved and included ● Want to use social influence and time ● Want to trust in the causes they support ● Want to give (time and money) with peers ● Want to see clear examples of how they are making a difference by giving (time and money) ● Want to get something back for their giving (impact, access, prestige, etc.) ● Want to support more organizations, and friends, in smaller amounts
  25. 25. Why don’t you give?
  26. 26. Joseph Mixer Why People Don’t Give Personal Characteristics ● Personal preferences ● Contrary believes Communication Problems ● Lack of information ● Ineffective communication Organizational Image Problems ● Perceptions of poor organizational behaviour Reactions to Solicitations ● Manner of asking ● Solicitor ● Finances ● Situations ● Relations with prospect ● Timing
  27. 27. Donor Funnel
  28. 28. People Searching to Donate
  29. 29. People Searching Kim Kardashian
  30. 30. People don’t wake up in the morning and think “I’m going to give some money away today”. Unfortunately.
  31. 31. Why People Don’t Give 1. Identifiable victim 2. Sense of fairness 3. Parochialism 4. Money 5. Diffusion of responsibility 6. Futility
  32. 32. Why People Don’t Give 1. Identifiable victim 2. Sense of fairness 3. Parochialism 4. Money 5. Diffusion of responsibility 6. Futility
  33. 33. Experiment/Quiz Time.
  34. 34. Option A Your $70 donation today will support water and health related projects around the world to help those who need it most.
  35. 35. Option B Your $70 donation today will provide clean water for 2 people for life living in the remote village of Sasiga in Ethiopia.
  36. 36. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  37. 37. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  38. 38. Experiment/Quiz Time.
  39. 39. Option A - Regular Our goal in this campaign is to raise money for the projects. Implementing each project costs $20,000. Your tax-deductible gift makes a difference.
  40. 40. Option B - Seed Our goal in this campaign is to raise money for the projects. Implementing each project costs $20,000. Your tax-deductible gift makes a difference. A private donor who believes in the importance of the project has given this campaign seed money in the amount of $10,000.
  41. 41. Option C - Match Our goal in this campaign is to raise money for the projects. Implementing each project costs $20,000. Your tax-deductible gift makes a difference. A private donor who believes in the importance of the project has given this campaign a matching grant in the amount of $10,000. The matching grant will match every dollar given by donors like you with a dollar, up to a total of $20,000
  42. 42. Option D - No Overhead Our goal in this campaign is to raise money for the projects. Implementing each project costs $20,000. Your tax-deductible gift makes a difference. A private donor who believes in the importance of the project has given this campaign a grant in the amount of $10,000 to cover all the overhead costs associated with raising the needed donations…
  43. 43. Science Magazine
  44. 44. Science Magazine
  45. 45. Rob Marquardt /FLICKR
  46. 46. Does anyone here give monthly?
  47. 47. Some research.
  48. 48. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  49. 49. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  50. 50. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  51. 51. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  52. 52. Giving every month is great for people who give.
  53. 53. Network for Good
  54. 54. People who give every month is great for you.
  55. 55. Communications is the biggest driver of donor retention.
  56. 56. So...
  57. 57. Framework Copyright MECLABS, Courtesy of NextAfter
  58. 58. Giving & Fundraising Recap ● Giving is good and we are wired for it ● The reasons why people give are complex, convoluted, and vary ● There are many reasons people don’t do it - namely futility and no opportunity ● Fundraising is about having the good of giving outweigh the (perceived) bad ● Framing the cause in tangible ways is hugely important ● Incentives aren’t the reason to give but help people give now ● Overhead is crap ● Good fundraising is focused on Lifetime Value (LTV) ● Donor retention and monthly giving key drives in LTV
  59. 59. Does anyone know what a pomelo is?
  60. 60. Curse of Knowledge.
  61. 61. Experiment/Quiz Time.
  62. 62. Option A Let me tell you about a young boy who dreams of becoming a doctor. A dream that was taken away from him when a classmate punched him in the face causing a traumatic cataract. He lost sight in one eye. A $150 donation today can restore his sight and with it his dream.
  63. 63. Option B This is Hery Moreno from Madagascar. He’s 10 years old and dreams of becoming a doctor. A dream that was taken away from him when a classmate punched him in the face causing a traumatic cataract. He lost sight in one eye. A $150 donation today can restore Hery’s sight and with it his dream.
  64. 64. Science of Giving: Experimental Approaches to the Study of Charity
  65. 65. Why People Don’t Give 1. Identifiable victim 2. Sense of fairness 3. Parochialism 4. Money 5. Diffusion of responsibility 6. Futility
  66. 66. Stories Spread. Stories Stick. What Spreads • Social Currency • Triggers • Emotion • Public • Practical Value • Stories What Sticks • Simple • Unexpectedness • Credibility • Concreteness • Emotion • Stories
  67. 67. Stories Spread. Stories Stick. What Spreads • Social Currency • Triggers • Emotion • Public • Practical Value • Stories What Sticks • Simple • Unexpectedness • Credibility • Concreteness • Emotion • Stories
  68. 68. We are wired for story.
  69. 69. We participate in stories and we fill in the gaps.
  70. 70. Driven by Emotion What Spreads • Social Currency • Triggers • Emotion • Public • Practical Value • Stories What Sticks • Simple • Unexpectedness • Credibility • Concreteness • Emotion • Stories
  71. 71. Dr. Paul Zak
  72. 72. A story without distress requires no intervention.
  73. 73. A story without empathy is just depressing.
  74. 74. A few story frameworks.
  75. 75. You are not the hero of the story.
  76. 76. Pixar Framework Once upon a time… Every day… One day… Because of that… Because of that… Until Finally… Daniel Pink’s To Sell Is Human
  77. 77. Nemo Disney
  78. 78. Charity water charity: water
  79. 79. Narrative Framework Hatch for Good
  80. 80. Stories are trojan horses.
  81. 81. A few story formats.
  82. 82. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  83. 83. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  84. 84. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  85. 85. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  86. 86. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  87. 87. Story Formats 1. Genesis 2. Future 3. Beneficiary 4. Staff 5. Donor/Supporter
  88. 88. So...
  89. 89. Storytelling & Communications Recap ● The Curse of Knowledge is a massive hurdle to overcome but stories can help ● Stories of one person allow us to connect better with them ● Stories spread and stories stick ● We are wired for story and participate in them ● Good (fundraising) stories involve distress (cortisol) and empathy (oxytocin) ● You are not the hero of the story ● Think of the Pixar and Narrative frameworks for your stories ● Stories can carry your values and beliefs for you - like trojan horses ● Future and Beneficiary stories are most often told in fundraising
  90. 90. Traffic x Average Gift x Conversion = Revenue Courtesy of NextAfter. Used with permission.
  91. 91. Impact Of Improvement In Each Area Courtesy of NextAfter. Used with permission.
  92. 92. Three steps in online fundraising.
  93. 93. Aware Engaged Action Attention Motivation Friction Traffic Average Gift Conversion Offer Qualify Decision Fundraising & Online Fundraising Flows
  94. 94. Offer Qualify Decision
  95. 95. A (Quick) Story.
  96. 96. Traffic = Revenue
  97. 97. Traffic = More Than (Just) Revenue
  98. 98. We live in a search world.
  99. 99. We live in a search world. Source: Internet Live Stats
  100. 100. We live in a (weird) search world. Source: College Humor
  101. 101. We live in a (weird) search world. Source: College Humor
  102. 102. We live in a (weird) search world. Source: College Humor
  103. 103. We live in a (weird) search world where Google is King. Source: Statista
  104. 104. Search - Paid & Organic - Drive Traffic
  105. 105. SEO = Earned. PPC = Bought.
  106. 106. PPC Strategy
  107. 107. SEO Alone
  108. 108. Ads Go To Desired & Relevant Landing Page
  109. 109. nonprofitsupply.co
  110. 110. Traffic is great. Repeat traffic is better.
  111. 111. Focus on getting emails as the start of the relationship.
  112. 112. Make It Easy to Find and Sign Up
  113. 113. Try to Communicate Value
  114. 114. Have a Dedicated Email Signup Page
  115. 115. Consider Pop Ups
  116. 116. Welcome new sign ups. Quickly.
  117. 117. Emails need to relevant, offer value, and reduce friction/anxiety.
  118. 118. Subject lines are hugely important!
  119. 119. Keep it simple and focused on one action.
  120. 120. Design Test
  121. 121. Point to focused landing pages.
  122. 122. Framework Copyright MECLABS, Courtesy of NextAfter
  123. 123. Have a post donation thank you page.
  124. 124. Integrate your current offline strategies.
  125. 125. Direct Mail
  126. 126. Online
  127. 127. But with pages. Not PDFs.
  128. 128. Digital Newsletter
  129. 129. Use Goals - Time and Monetary
  130. 130. Use Goals - Time and Monetary
  131. 131. What about social...
  132. 132. People Have and Want to Use their Influence
  133. 133. Help People Use Their Influence
  134. 134. Peer to Peer & Crowdfunding
  135. 135. Peer to Peer & Crowdfunding Tips
  136. 136. Donor Testimonials & Social Influence
  137. 137. Natalie and First United social.
  138. 138. So...
  139. 139. Digital & Online Fundraising Recap ● Attention (Traffic) x Motivation (Average Gift) x Friction (Conversion Rate) = Revenue ● Through social, email, ads, etc. you make ‘offers’ that point to your website for people to ‘qualify’ the offer before making a ‘decision’ ● Getting traffic to your website is half the battle and not easy (but a Google Ad Grant can help) ● Focusing on securing emails as a starting action and then welcoming and sending (frequent and quality) emails is key ● Point people to focused pages where they can take action ● Integrate your offline online by translating - not just PDFs
  140. 140. Tools & Resources ● MailChimp ● WordPress ● Stripe ● Hootsuite ● Google Ad Grant ● CanadaHelps ● Chimp ● FundRazr ● NextAfter ● Classy ● Network for Good ● CanadaHelps ● CauseVox ● Future Fundraising Now ● Recharity.ca ● Made to Stick ● Winning the Story Wars
  141. 141. Online Fundraising Checklist ❏ Test your own site ❏ Find and sign up for email ❏ Find and make a donation ❏ Host a donate page on your own site (even if that page links out) ❏ Chimp or CanadaHelps can work if you don’t (and are a charity) ❏ FundRazr can work if you aren’t a charity ❏ Have a custom welcome email after email sign up ❏ MailChimp can do this ❏ Try to thank people within 3 days of a gift ❏ Get your Google Ad Grant ❏ First need to register with TechSoup Canada ❏ Have thank-you pages after key actions ❏ Donate ❏ Email sign up ❏ Form complete
  142. 142. The Results Metric Nov 2014 - Sep 2015 Nov 2015 - Sep 2016 Change Traffic 21,430 31,978 49.22% Conversion Rate 1.81% 1.46% -19.17% Donations 388 468 20.62% Average Gift $128.46 $176.76 37.60% Revenue $49,843.28 $82,724.31 65.97%
  143. 143. What We Did ● New website (focused on emails and donations) ● Built goals and tracking (eCommerce) ● More focused pages ● Newsletter page & digital strategy ● Google Ad Grant ● Focus more on emails (getting, welcoming, sending) ● More tangible asks and ask amounts ● Deeper integration with offline ● Stories of ONE person
  144. 144. Some examples.
  145. 145. New Website
  146. 146. New Website
  147. 147. Built Goals and Tracking
  148. 148. Built Goals and Tracking
  149. 149. More Focused Pages
  150. 150. Newsletter Page & Digital Strategy
  151. 151. Google Ad Grant
  152. 152. Learn from Search
  153. 153. Learn from Ads
  154. 154. Focused Landing Page Based on Ads & Search
  155. 155. Emails - Getting
  156. 156. Emails - Welcoming
  157. 157. Emails - Sending
  158. 158. More Tangible Asks & Ask Amounts
  159. 159. Integration
  160. 160. Integration
  161. 161. Stories of One Person
  162. 162. Lessons Learned Along the Way ● All organizations’ donors are different ● All donors are different ● Getting content (photos, stories, etc.) can be difficult ● Even with ‘cheap’ and ‘free’ digital, holistic and long-term strategies are best ● Important to hear from donors - early and often ● Managing, hosting, building, etc. technology is crazy (and expensive) ● Learn (aka borrow/steal) from others who are doing it well ● Start where you can, build from there ● Track what you can, build from there

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