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Interactive storytelling games (July 2020)

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Interactive storytelling games (July 2020)

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Presentation about interactive storytelling games to promote speaking by language learners. Workshop given at the Trendy English games fest on 5th July 20020 - https://trendyenglish.ru/gamefest

Presentation about interactive storytelling games to promote speaking by language learners. Workshop given at the Trendy English games fest on 5th July 20020 - https://trendyenglish.ru/gamefest

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Interactive storytelling games (July 2020)

  1. 1. Interactive Storytelling Games Graham Stanley, @grahamstanley PHOTOGRAPHY
  2. 2. Interactive Storytelling Games Storytelling – your experience Interactive Stories • Storytelling techniques and an example • Integration / writing your own Interactive Storytelling Games • Role-playing games • Interactive storytelling games - examples PHOTOGRAPHY
  3. 3. Interactive Storytelling Games Storytelling • What is your experience? • Do you use stories in class? • How do you approach storytelling?
  4. 4. Interactive Storytelling Games What is an interactive story? An interactive story is a guided short story in text form, with questions. It is a speaking acivity, with students working in pairs. The storyteller has a handout of the story and reads it stopping to ask the listener questions. The storyteller continues when happy with the responses. Mark White http://englishconversations.org/interactive-stories
  5. 5. The small town photographer PHOTOGRAPHY Interactive Storytelling Games
  6. 6. Interactive Storytelling Games Creating your own interactive story • Think of a story that will appeal to your students • Make it sketchy and open-ended so they can fill in the details and complete the story the way they want to • Interactive stories can be adapted for different levels of students and appeal to all age groups. e.g. The small town photographer was designed for students to practise the 1st conditional and to stimulate writing. PHOTOGRAPHY
  7. 7. Interactive Storytelling Games Role-playing games Interactive story-telling + co-created, more open-ended stories + random events and outcomes + facilitated by a Games Master (GM) + longer activities (several classes) Example storytelling games • Escape the dinner party • Get the treasure and escape! • A fortnight in the valley
  8. 8. Interactive Storytelling Games • Interactive storytelling games – example Escape the family dinner party! Language-focused Task-based Creative outcomes https://www.slideshare.net/bcgstanley/escape-the-dinner-partt
  9. 9. Interactive Storytelling Games • Interactive storytelling games – example Get the treasure and escape! Collaborative, interactive co-creation of story Player chosen hidden wants Random outcomes https://www.slideshare.net/bcgstanley/get-the-treasure-and-escape-the-island?
  10. 10. Interactive Storytelling Games • Interactive storytelling games – example A fortnight in the valley Collaborative, interactive Co-creation of story Random events and outcomes • If anyone wants to play this today: https://tinyurl.com/talin2020
  11. 11. Interactive Storytelling Games Graham Stanley, @grahamstanley Any questions?

Notas do Editor

  • Interactive story-telling is a very effective way of engaging students and encouraging them to speak better in English. It can also enrich learners’ vocabulary and can be easily adapted to suit a variety of different age groups and levels of learners. Today, I will be looking at a number of practical activities involving interactive storytelling games that teachers can use with adults and young learners.

    Designed to stimulate student conversation and imagination, interactive storytelling games can be used with all different levels and age groups of students. You'll see how these activities can easily be set up and can motivate your students to speak.
     
    Graham Stanley is the British Council's English for Education Systems Lead for the Americas. He is editor of Remote Teaching (British Council, 2019), author of Language Learning with Technology (CUP, 2013), and co-author of Digital Play: Computer Games and Language Aims (Delta Publishing, 2011). Graham is also Newsletter editor for the IATEFL LTSIG.

    Presentation given on July 5th at
    http://trendyenglish.ru/gamefest?fbclid=IwAR0-EgpkvkDS4ux5LqrxXIo6JPLix_spyDp6_4RpGDlSXV2diFSy3ooh9Q0
  • This presentation has the following parts to it. First, I’ll be looking at storytelling in general.
    Then we’ll look at interactive stories, the techniques and an example story, followed by ideas if you want to write your own
    Finally, we’ll look at role-playing games in general and then at a couple of examples of interactive storytelling games that use similar techniques to encourage student to speak.
  • Do you use storytelling in the classroom? How do you approach it?
  • I first came across the concept of interactve storytelling years ago, when I was introduced to it by an English teacher based in Japan, called Mark White. Mark has lots of example stories and recordings of students telling his stories on his website.

    I immediately liked the idea and decided to write one of my own to try out with my own students.
  • Let’s try out that story I wrote. Although Mark’s idea was to have the students telling the stories in pairs, it also works as a whole class activity, and that is how we will try it today.

    THE SMALL TOWN PHOTOGRAPHER 1. The Wedding Photograph
    by Graham Stanley, 2005
      
    A photographer (What is his name?) lives in a small town (Where is it?) where he has successfully made a good living for many years. In the window of his shop he proudly displays some of the wedding photographs he has taken of happy couples over the years.
     
    He is very fond of one photograph in particular (What does it show?) It’s of a couple posing next to a ruined tower with a brilliant red sunset in the background of the picture. (Why is he proud of it?) It’s a particularly good photograph and ever since displaying this photo in his shop window, he has noticed an increase in the number of customers his studio has received, especially for weddings. And people enquiring about wedding photographic services always comment upon it. (What do they say?) He’s convinced that the photo is a one-off, and he has often tried to recreate the photo again with different couples – in fact they often ask for it – but it never turns out the same way (Why not? What’s wrong with them?)
     
    (What is his explanation?) There must have been something special about that day, something magical. He was just starting out as a wedding photographer, the couple in question were so in love, plus an extra, unknown factor.
     
    One October morning (what is he doing?) he is surprised by a special visitor (Who is it?) It is the woman featured in his special wedding photo. Quite a bit older, but still recognisable. She waits until he isn’t busy and introduces herself. (What does she want?)
     
    She explains that she has recently moved back to the town after living elsewhere. (Where was she living? With who?) She is living with her mother now. ‘I’m sorry’ says the photographer (What does he think has happened?) He believes the woman has divorced her husband.
     
    The woman does not explain, but she does ask the photographer a big favour. (What is it?) She asks him to remove the photograph from his window as she now passes the photographer’s studio every day on her way to work and the photograph disturbs her (Why?)
     
    The photographer is surprised by the woman’s request and agrees to it, telling her that he will remove it at the end of the day. The woman thanks him and leaves the shop. The man works hard for the rest of the day, and starts to wonder if he has made the right decision agreeing to remove his lucky photograph from his window. (What does he do?)
     
    He does, however, remove the photograph from the window, and places it carefully in storage at the back of the shop. But the next day, he regrets his decision because of three incidents.
     
    Talk to your partner and say why the photographer wishes he hadn’t taken the photograph from the window, explaining the three things that happen to justify his superstition.

  • Guidelines when creating your own interacive stories.
  • Role
  • Role
  • Role
  • Role
  • Interactive story-telling is a very effective way of engaging students and encouraging them to speak better in English. It can also enrich learners’ vocabulary and can be easily adapted to suit a variety of different age groups and levels of learners. Today, I will be looking at a number of practical activities involving interactive storytelling games that teachers can use with adults and young learners.

    Designed to stimulate student conversation and imagination, interactive storytelling games can be used with all different levels and age groups of students. You'll see how these activities can easily be set up and can motivate your students to speak.
     
    Graham Stanley is the British Council's English for Education Systems Lead for the Americas. He is editor of Remote Teaching (British Council, 2019), author of Language Learning with Technology (CUP, 2013), and co-author of Digital Play: Computer Games and Language Aims (Delta Publishing, 2011). Graham is also Newsletter editor for the IATEFL LTSIG.

    Presentation given on July 5th at
    http://trendyenglish.ru/gamefest?fbclid=IwAR0-EgpkvkDS4ux5LqrxXIo6JPLix_spyDp6_4RpGDlSXV2diFSy3ooh9Q0

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