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Module 1 Week 1 DiscussionChristopher Allen posted Feb 11, 202.docx

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Module 1 Week 1 Discussion
Christopher Allen posted Feb 11, 2020 4:44 PM
1. How do you think the European case discussed i...
careers deal in service attributes and I am pretty sure someone
who attempted to murder someone with a poison might not be...
Vittal Anantatmula
Kathryn N. Wells
‹#›
Finishing the Project & Realizing the Benefits
Chapter 15
‹#›
Chapter 15 Core Obje...
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Module 1 Week 1 DiscussionChristopher Allen posted Feb 11, 202.docx

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Module 1 Week 1 Discussion

Christopher Allen posted Feb 11, 2020 4:44 PM

1. How do you think the European case discussed in the video report would be decided in the United States? Why? In the United States there are many laws that help protect against discrimination. These laws cover the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex (U.S. EEOC, n.d). In the United States however, the wear of religious clothing in the workplace can be frowned upon depending on the career choice for safety reasons. Also visibly projecting a particular religion onto others could be a violation of others religious beliefs. So I understand why some businesses would want to deter the use of religious wear at work. According to the EEOC though, the law requires employers to “reasonably” accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs. Because of this law I believe it would be a more acceptable practice in the United States.
2. Select a category (age, race, religion, marital status, criminal/incarceration history, pregnancy, sex, sexual identity, education level, parenthood, national origin, dress, economic status, military status, and so forth). The most stereotypical choice would be military but for this example I want to focus on criminal/incarceration history.
3. In the United States, how are individuals in the category that you selected protected from discrimination in employment? Unfortunately there are no specific federal laws that prohibit employers from asking about an prospects criminal history, but it is a federal law to use criminal history to make employment decisions under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (U.S. EEOC, n.d.). I think however that if a person was convicted of a crime and served their time that it should not be discriminated against unless it is a crime such as pedophilia and they are applying to a place like child care or working in a school. Many careers deal in service attributes and I am pretty sure someone who attempted to murder someone with a poison might not be best suited for working in a kitchen. So in some aspects I am I guess discriminatory against those with a criminal history.
4. For the category you have selected, how are U.S. protections different from or similar to protections in another country (You choose the country to make the comparison). Much like the United States most of Europe does not have laws that prohibit criminal record-based employment discrimination (CBED). The protections are very similar in that only a limited amount of a person’s criminal record can be taken into account. Criminals in European countries do have to obtain or submit a criminal record certificate, but they do not have to provide a copy of their criminal record to the employer (Jacobs, Larrauri, 2015)
.

Reference
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Laws Enforced by EEOC Retrieved from https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Pre-Employment Inquiries a.

Module 1 Week 1 Discussion

Christopher Allen posted Feb 11, 2020 4:44 PM

1. How do you think the European case discussed in the video report would be decided in the United States? Why? In the United States there are many laws that help protect against discrimination. These laws cover the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex (U.S. EEOC, n.d). In the United States however, the wear of religious clothing in the workplace can be frowned upon depending on the career choice for safety reasons. Also visibly projecting a particular religion onto others could be a violation of others religious beliefs. So I understand why some businesses would want to deter the use of religious wear at work. According to the EEOC though, the law requires employers to “reasonably” accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs. Because of this law I believe it would be a more acceptable practice in the United States.
2. Select a category (age, race, religion, marital status, criminal/incarceration history, pregnancy, sex, sexual identity, education level, parenthood, national origin, dress, economic status, military status, and so forth). The most stereotypical choice would be military but for this example I want to focus on criminal/incarceration history.
3. In the United States, how are individuals in the category that you selected protected from discrimination in employment? Unfortunately there are no specific federal laws that prohibit employers from asking about an prospects criminal history, but it is a federal law to use criminal history to make employment decisions under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (U.S. EEOC, n.d.). I think however that if a person was convicted of a crime and served their time that it should not be discriminated against unless it is a crime such as pedophilia and they are applying to a place like child care or working in a school. Many careers deal in service attributes and I am pretty sure someone who attempted to murder someone with a poison might not be best suited for working in a kitchen. So in some aspects I am I guess discriminatory against those with a criminal history.
4. For the category you have selected, how are U.S. protections different from or similar to protections in another country (You choose the country to make the comparison). Much like the United States most of Europe does not have laws that prohibit criminal record-based employment discrimination (CBED). The protections are very similar in that only a limited amount of a person’s criminal record can be taken into account. Criminals in European countries do have to obtain or submit a criminal record certificate, but they do not have to provide a copy of their criminal record to the employer (Jacobs, Larrauri, 2015)
.

Reference
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Laws Enforced by EEOC Retrieved from https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/
U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Pre-Employment Inquiries a.

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Module 1 Week 1 DiscussionChristopher Allen posted Feb 11, 202.docx

  1. 1. Module 1 Week 1 Discussion Christopher Allen posted Feb 11, 2020 4:44 PM 1. How do you think the European case discussed in the video report would be decided in the United States? Why? In the United States there are many laws that help protect against discrimination. These laws cover the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, or sex (U.S. EEOC, n.d). In the United States however, the wear of religious clothing in the workplace can be frowned upon depending on the career choice for safety reasons. Also visibly projecting a particular religion onto others could be a violation of others religious beliefs. So I understand why some businesses would want to deter the use of religious wear at work. According to the EEOC though, the law requires employers to “reasonably” accommodate an employee’s religious beliefs. Because of this law I believe it would be a more acceptable practice in the United States. 2. Select a category (age, race, religion, marital status, criminal/incarceration history, pregnancy, sex, sexual identity, education level, parenthood, national origin, dress, economic status, military status, and so forth). The most stereotypical choice would be military but for this example I want to focus on criminal/incarceration history. 3. In the United States, how are individuals in the category that you selected protected from discrimination in employment? Unfortunately there are no specific federal laws that prohibit employers from asking about an prospects criminal history, but it is a federal law to use criminal history to make employment decisions under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (U.S. EEOC, n.d.). I think however that if a person was convicted of a crime and served their time that it should not be discriminated against unless it is a crime such as pedophilia and they are applying to a place like child care or working in a school. Many
  2. 2. careers deal in service attributes and I am pretty sure someone who attempted to murder someone with a poison might not be best suited for working in a kitchen. So in some aspects I am I guess discriminatory against those with a criminal history. 4. For the category you have selected, how are U.S. protections different from or similar to protections in another country (You choose the country to make the comparison). Much like the United States most of Europe does not have laws that prohibit criminal record-based employment discrimination (CBED). The protections are very similar in that only a limited amount of a person’s criminal record can be taken into account. Criminals in European countries do have to obtain or submit a criminal record certificate, but they do not have to provide a copy of their criminal record to the employer (Jacobs, Larrauri, 2015) . Reference U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Laws Enforced by EEOC Retrieved from https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/statutes/ U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC). N.d. Pre-Employment Inquiries and Arrest & Conviction Retrieved from https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/practices/inquiries_arrest_conv iction.cfm Jacobs, J. Larrauri, E. January 13, 2015. European employment discrimination based on criminal record II – discretionary bars Retrieved from https://ccresourcecenter.org/2015/01/13/european- discretionary-employment-discrimination-based-criminal- record/ CONTEMPORARY PROJECT MANAGEMENT, 4E Timothy J. Kloppenborg
  3. 3. Vittal Anantatmula Kathryn N. Wells ‹#› Finishing the Project & Realizing the Benefits Chapter 15 ‹#› Chapter 15 Core Objectives: Describe how to determine when a project should be terminated early & the process for terminating a project in normal completion time. Describe the importance of the project closing activities & how to perform them. Create & present a transition plan for the project, including a plan for ongoing support and sharing lessons learned. Capture and share project lessons learned. Chapter 15 Technical Objectives: Close your projects administratively using MS Project 2016 Chapter 15 Behavioral Objectives: Secure customer feedback & acceptance of the project. Assist senior management in managing talent & managing resources for upcoming projects.
  4. 4. Celebrating Project Success Trinmar It was only later that I was sheepishly advised by one of my fellow consultants that he had offered to have our company sponsor the celebration, and did not have the chance to tell me in advance. But the true impact of the celebration—reflected in the sincere joy and pride of the project team members as they received the sincere thanks of their CEO—had already proven the value of the event. Bruce Miller, PMP, managing partner, Xavier Leadership Center, Xavier University 6 Finishing the Project & Realizing the Benefits A project moves into the closing stage when its customers accept the project deliverables A project can close as planned or be terminated early Complete closing activities Validate Scope Formal acceptance of project deliverables Buyer provides the seller with formal written acceptance Transition from executing stage to closing stage Use a project closeout checklist to itemize project activities and/or deliverables Validate scope – formally accepting the completed project deliverables
  5. 5. Terminate Projects Early Mutual Agreements What deliverables or partial deliverables go to the buyer What compensation goes to the seller Resolve outstanding issues with negotiated settlement Terminations for Default Problems with the project’s cost, schedule, or performance Lost confidence in the contractor Terminations for Convenience of Buyer Buyer faces unexpected difficulties or changing priorities Customer’s needs change Often requires a payment to the contractor Heading Off Early Termination Find other stakeholders who can provide funds Look internally to find ways of continuing with the project PMs make recommendations for early termination if they feel it is warranted Communicate quickly and honestly
  6. 6. Close Project Write Transition Plan Knowledge Management Create the Closeout Report Finalize all activities needed to finish the project Write Transition Plan Charter/instruction manual for how to use the project deliverables Provide appropriate documentation to users Ensure quality problems are avoided Ensure project deliverables transition into operational role Ensure maintenance, upgrades, & training take place Breakout session! Write a short transition plan to give to your customers, detailing any information they will need to successfully use/implement the deliverables created by your project. Knowledge Management Should occur throughout the project life Most apparent as a project comes to a close Capture lessons learned Disseminate and use lessons learned in order to help your organization improve Pertains to 4th area of the balanced scorecard—growth & innovation
  7. 7. Solicit Customer Feedback Capture Lessons Learned At milestones and at the end of project Identify major project issues One issue at a time to determine what went wrong & how it might be avoided in future projects. List significant successes and discuss what caused each What worked well? Where might a different method yield better results? Lessons Learned Example Project Closing Document See many lessons learned examples in Exhibit 15.4 on p.507 in textbook Disseminate and Use Lessons Learned Key to knowledge management! Establish method for documenting & sharing lessons learned Decide how to store lessons for easy access
  8. 8. Code each lesson by type of project, stage in project life cycle, or issue it concerns Create the Closeout Report This formal report includes summary of: Project’s original justification Ultimate status Lessons learned Did the project accomplish what it was originally approved to do? Closeout Report Template Post- Project Activities Reassign Workers Celebrate Success & Reward Participants Provide Ongoing Support Ensure Project Benefits are Realized Reassign Workers Update personnel records Make honest recommendations Help team members secure next assignments
  9. 9. “Helping good workers secure follow-on work is one of the most important things a project manager must do.” Celebrate Success and Reward Participants Challenge Energize Limit Exert Believe Recognize Acknowledge Transition Ease Stress “the project is over; we will limit any additional work on this project.” Provide Ongoing Support Ultimate project goal is to provide capable customers, who will… Use the deliverables you provided Recommend you for future work Often requires support after project is complete Ensure Project Benefits are Realized How well are customers able to use the deliverables? Consider use by direct customers and other stakeholders May require following up with customers weeks or months after project’s end Using MS Project for Project Closure Creating Project Progress Reports
  10. 10. Archiving project work Using MS Project for Project Closure Creating Project Progress Reports Creating a customizable canned report Sharing Report—can be printed or saved as PDF Export report to MS Excel See detailed instructions in textbook, pp.511-512 Using MS Project for Project Closure Archiving project work Complete schedule to maximize future usefulness Applying performance data Applying approved changes Ensuring all activities are complete Archive schedule for use as template or “starter file” Capture & publish lessons learned Detailed instructions on textbook p. 514 Success celebrated Lessons learned recorded Summary Projects may be terminated early Mutual agreement Default Convenience of customer Whether project finishes successfully as planned or not, a
  11. 11. variety of closeout procedures is required Money paid & accounted for Documentation completed & distributed Workers reassigned & rewarded The Power of Lessons Learned PM IN ACTION “Successful people learn from Their mistakes AND the mistakes of OTHERS.” —Sir John Templeton PMBOK Exams Make sure you are studying from most current (6th) PMBOK edition, since there have been substantial changes made within the Closing Process Group All closing activities—whether contractual, administrative, or other—now fall under the Close Project or Phase process. Remember the importance of capturing, storing, & disseminating lessons learned (throughout the project but especially at project’s end). This needs to take place whether or not the project reaches a successful conclusion. Since the PM often has limited authority, the sponsor should be involved in Close Project. Casa de Paz Development Project What would you include in a transition plan? How would you capture lessons learned?
  12. 12. Who would you share those lesson with and how? CONTEMPORARY PROJECT MANAGEMENT, 4E Timothy J. Kloppenborg Vittal Anantatmula Kathryn N. Wells ‹#› Determining Project Progress and Results Chapter 14 ‹#› Chapter 14 Core Objectives: Develop and demonstrate use of a change control system Demonstrate how to monitor and control project risks with various resolution strategies Create and present a project progress report Chapter 14 Technical Objectives: Describe project quality tools, including how and when to use each Calculate current project schedule and budget progress, and predict future progress, using earned value analysis (EVA) Document project progress using MS Project
  13. 13. Chapter 14 Behavioral Objectives: Describe the importance of formal reporting and communications Demonstrate negotiating skills Manage conflicts during the project execution Duke Energy “The fundamental reason for determining project progress and results comes down to one thing—presenting actionable, decision-making information to project leaders…Identifying, collecting, managing and presenting data that allow you to control critical aspects of your projects is a fundamental element of project success.” Paul Kling, director – project management and controls, Power Delivery Engineering, Duke Energy 6 Five Aspects of Project Determination “Determine” can mean: to give direction to or decide the course of; to be the cause of, to influence, or to regulate; to limit in scope; to reach a decision; to come to a conclusion or resolution. The PM and Decision Making During project execution, a PM may need to: Give directions
  14. 14. Re-plan Influence Guard the scope Follow-up to ensure proper results are delivered PM decision-making may involve: Personally making decisions Delegating decisions Being part of a group that makes decisions Facilitating a decision-making process Project Balanced Scorecard Approach – Perspectives Customer Internal business Financial Growth and innovation Balanced Scorecard Approach to Project Determination Internal Project Issues Project’s nerve center consists of integration, risk, & communications issues. Integration includes making choices to ensure project results are delivered. PM needs to understand priorities and make decisions accordingly.
  15. 15. Internal Project Issues Direct and Manage Project Work Monitor and Control Project Work Monitor Project Risk Implement Risk Responses Manage Communications Monitor Communications Direct and Manage Project Work Empower Control Empower others as possible, yet control as necessary when authorizing & performing project work Who is allowed to authorize? When is it time to perform the work? Directing and managing project work – performing the work as defined in various components of the project management plan, including approved changes, with an intent to accomplish project objectives. Sources of Work to be Performed Work package level of the WBS Approved corrective actions Preventive actions Defect repairs Aids to Project Tradeoff Decisions Well-developed project charters Effective stakeholder management Clear communications
  16. 16. Monitor and Control Project Work Monitoring and controlling project work – a series of activities such as identifying work packages for tracking, reviewing, and documenting the progress to ensure that the project execution meets performance objectives as defined in the project plan. Monitor – reviewing the progress and capturing project performance data with reference to the project plan; developing performance measures; and communicating performance information. Control – assessing actual performance obtained from monitoring a work element and comparing it with planned performance, determining variances, analyzing trends to identify and implement process improvements, evaluating possible alternatives, and recommending appropriate corrective action as needed. Monitor and Control Project Work Variance – a measurable departure from a planned baseline or expected value What metrics to keep What to measure How to report results Monitor and Control Project Work Continually measure & observe throughout the project Activities occur in parallel with project execution
  17. 17. Activities need to be timely Allow workers to self-control their work when possible Types of Project Control Steering control - work is compared to the plan on a continual basis Go/no go control – PM must receive approval to continue Corrective actions Preventive actions Defect repair Possible Monitoring and Controlling Decisions Revisit the project charter Adjust the project plan Adjust day-to-day instructions Proceed to project closing Results of Monitoring and Controlling a Project Perform Integrated Change Control Change is a reality on all projects Correct person or group needs to approve changes Need a simple, standard system for proposing and evaluating changes Perform integrated change control – reviewing all change proposals, estimating their impact on project goals wherever appropriate, approving or declining changes, and managing
  18. 18. changes to deliverables, schedules, budgets, and the project management plan. Change control – a process wherein change proposals to various project planning elements are acknowledged, formally documented, and either approved or declined after review. Perform Integrated Change Control Change control board – consists of a formal group authorized and responsible for reviewing, evaluating, approving, delaying, or rejecting any changes to any aspect of the project plan by following a formal communication method of documenting the decision process. Project manager Sponsor Core team Key stakeholders Change is expected; plan only the first iteration Breakout session! With your team, create a simple change-request form and use it to propose a real or potential change to your project plan. Evaluate how this change would affect your project management plan (schedule, budget, quality, etc.) and decide whether or not to approve the change request. Monitor Project Risk Consider multiple responses to a given risk For previously identified risk events:
  19. 19. Track the identified risks Execute the response plans Evaluate their effectiveness Monitor risks – the process of adhering to the risk response plan of tracking identified risks, identifying new risks, monitoring residual risks, and evaluating the effectiveness of the risk response process throughout the project. Resolving Project Risks Unanticipated risks may materialize Unknown risks require contingency Time Budget, Other resources Risk Event Resolution Strategies Implement Risk Responses Possible outcomes of implementing a risk response include: Updates to the risk register Approved change orders Lessons learned Implement risk responses– when a risk event occurs or is likely to occur soon, the person assigned to that risk executes the strategy identified in the risk management plan. Manage Communications Determine project information needs
  20. 20. Establish an information retrieval & distribution system Collect information on executed work & work in progress Report progress to all stakeholders Manage communications – all the work connected with the communications management plan, including planning for it; generating it; organizing and sharing it; and storing and disposing of it. Determine Project Information Needs Communicate Accurately Promptly Effectively Authorization to proceed Direction setting Status reporting Approval of outputs Establish Information Retrieval and Distribution System Target the communications Use new & proven communications methods Refer to communications plan Use active listening Collect Information on Executed Work and Work in Progress How well is this particular activity proceeding in terms of time and budget? How well is the entire project proceeding in terms of time and
  21. 21. budget? How much more money will need to be spent to finish? To what extent does the quality of this work meet requirements? Collect Information on Executed Work and Work in Progress What methods that we have used need to be improved before we do that type of work again? What evidence supports the answers to the above questions? What methods that we have used are worth repeating? How many hours of human resource time have we used to complete this activity compared to how much we estimated? Report Performance Work performance data – actual, raw observations and measurements during execution of project activities Work performance information – the work performance data analyzed in context and integrated, considering relations across areas Work performance reports – the compilation of work performance information in some physical or electronic form that are presented as project documents intended to generate awareness, discussions, decision-making, or other suitable actions Report Performance Report weekly/daily Emphasize specifics Report the target date, current status Update risk register and issues logs Consider recommended changes
  22. 22. Brief standup meetings; no chair, no coffee Time Horizons for Project Performance Monitor Communications Monitor communications– monitoring and controlling communications throughout the project lifecycle in order to make certain that the information needs of all stakeholders are met Team members empowered to decide what to do & when Communication is frequent & rapid Rolling wave planning Change is expected Monitor Communications– Agile Burndown Chart Used to show amount of work remaining Customer Issues Manage & Control Quality Manage quality—forward-looking Control quality—backward-looking Control Scope
  23. 23. Quality management & control tools… complete list in Exhibit 14.9 Flow chart—model showing work flow Check sheet—simple, structured form to gather data Pareto chart—vertical bar graph, showing frequency of problems Cause and effect diagram—outline showing possible causes Histogram—vertical bar graph, showing average & variation Run chart—scatter-diagram showing time Control chart—run chart with process average & control limits Flow Chart Check Sheet Pareto Chart Cause and Effect diagram Histogram Run Chart
  24. 24. Control Chart Control Scope Insist all changes go through integrated change control system Try to avoid changes to scope Work from a scope baseline Control scope – the act of closely monitoring the project and product scope status and only allowing necessary changes to the scope baseline. Scope change – any change to the project work activities or deliverable Control Scope How large a difference between actual and planned scope Reasons for the difference Action necessary to resolve differences Variance analysis – the process of determining both the cause and the amount of difference between planned and actual performance. Success of product is predicted by having team members— including product owner—use product before customers do Financial Issues Control Resources Control Schedule & Costs Earned Value Management for Controlling Schedule & Costs
  25. 25. Control Resources Lack of necessary resources could adversely affect both budget & schedule PM needs to look ahead to make sure resources are available when needed & solve problems proactively Control resources– a process by which all of the physical resources needed to perform the project are planned and monitored, and changes are made if necessary throughout the life of the project. Control Schedule and Costs Comparing actual cost & schedule to baseline Changes made through the integrated change control system Ensure no more money than authorized is spent Methods: Earned value management Project scheduling software Earned Value Management A decision-making tool Examine project status at a given point in time Understand project’s progress in terms of cost and schedule Earned value management – a management method of measuring schedule & cost performance EVM Terms Earned Value Management Example
  26. 26. Currently Known Values Budget at completion (BAC) – how much was the project supposed to cost? Actual cost (AC) – how much did the work already done cost? Earned value (EV) – How much work is done? Planned value (PV) – How much work should be done? Variances Cost variance (CV) – How much is the project over or under budget? Schedule variance (SV) – How much is the schedule ahead or behind? Indexes Cost performance index (CPI) – How efficient is the budget? Schedule performance index (SPI) – How efficient is the schedule? Estimates Estimate at completion (EAC) – What do we think the total project will cost? Estimate to complete (ETC) – How much more do we expect to
  27. 27. spend? Use past performance to estimate future performance To-complete performance index (TCPI) – How efficient do we need to be to finish on budget? Using MS Project 2016 to Monitor and Control Projects What makes a schedule useful How MS Project recalculates the schedule based on reported actuals Current and future impacts of time and cost variances Define the performance update process Steps to update the project schedule What Makes a Schedule Useful? Each of the three sets of data includes start and finish dates, duration, work, & cost The Baseline set –a copy of the stakeholder approved scheduled values. Past actual time and cost results—What actually happened as reported by the resources assigned to activities. Future estimated time and costs-- Scheduled values are used and continuously recalculated by MS Project. The planned schedule
  28. 28. Performance data The scheduled set How MS Project Recalculates the Schedule Based on Reported Actuals Copies data entered into Actual fields into Scheduled fields, replacing estimates Recalculates future activity schedules based on past activities and future estimates Current and Future Impacts of Time and Cost Variance Comparisons between any two sets of data can help you understand: Time & cost performance variances from baseline Critical path changes Resource allocation issues Emerging risks Remaining contingency & management reserves Impacts of proposed changes Define the Performance Update Process Who reports? All team members and suppliers assigned to previously scheduled activities Any resource wanting to change an activity What is reported? Actual Start, Actual Finish, Actual Duration Complete, & Estimated Remaining Duration When to report? Status Date driven by the date of the stakeholder review meeting PM publishes “Status Date” or “As of Date” How to report?
  29. 29. List of team members’ current assignments Previously reported Actuals Steps to Update the Project Schedule Acquire the performance data Set the status date (as of) Display the status date line on Gantt chart Enter duration-based performance data Reschedule remaining work Revise future estimates Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 1: Acquire the Performance Data (duration-based data) Date assignment started How much duration is completed How much duration remains Actual finish date (if finished) Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 2: Set the status date (as of) Click the Project Tabb>>Properties Group>>Project Information Click the “Status date” drop-down Set Status date, as shown in Exhibit 14.19 Click OK Step 2: Set the status date (as of)
  30. 30. Step 3: Display the status date line on the Gantt chart Click the Task Tab>>View Group>>Gantt Chart Right click on the right pane>>select Gridlines In the “Line to change list,” select Status Date (see Exhibit 14.20) In the “Normal” box, choose dashed dotted line; choose Green for color Click OK Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 3: Display the status date line on the Gantt chart Step 3: Display the status date line on the Gantt chart Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 4: Enter the Duration-Based Performance Data See detailed instructions pp.484-486 of textbook Step 4: Enter the duration-based performance data Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 5: Re-schedule Remaining Work
  31. 31. Click on Task Project >> Status group>> Update Project In Update Project dialog, click Reschedule uncompleted work to start after: Enter Status Date Click on Selected tasks OK Steps to Update the Project Schedule Step 6: Revise Future Estimates At any status meetings, ask team members if estimates for their upcoming tasks need updating Replanning if Necessary Use the integrated change control system to understand the impact What kinds of changes might we make in response to the problems? Does the approval for a change need to be escalated to higher management? Summary
  32. 32. PM needs to understand how changes in one area might impact another area PMs monitor & control project activities Adjustments to projects processed through the project’s integrated change control process Potential changes will be proposed, approved/ disapproved, documented, & implemented Summary PMs control project aspects that are subject to tradeoffs—scope, quality, cost, & schedule Use quality control tools to understand quality level, where problems exist, root causes, & how to improve processes Use earned value management (EVM) and MS Project to understand, document, & improve on cost and schedule progress Controlling, Monitoring, and Reporting Projects at a Major Medical Center Team-level monitoring Division-level monitoring Institutional-level monitoring PM IN ACTION Emergency Medicine Division of Cincinnati Children’s Hospital
  33. 33. Controlling, Monitoring, and Reporting Projects at a Major Medical Center PM IN ACTION Primary aim was a reduction in length of stay for patients, supported by process measures representing specific intervals of this time, such as time from arrival in the department to being seen by a physician & time from being able to leave the department to actually leaving. Controlling, Monitoring, and Reporting Projects at a Major Medical Center PM IN ACTION The intent of this dashboard is to provide hospital leadership with a high-level view of recent progress on individual projects PMBOK Exams You can expect to see several questions using Earned Value Management (EVM) on either the CAPM or PMP, and you will not be provided with the formulas. You should memorize all of the following formulas and write them down on the blank paper you are provided with as soon as you enter the testing room so you can refer to them throughout the test CV (cost variance) = EV-AC SV (schedule variance) = EV-PV CPI (cost performance index) = EV/AC SPI (schedule performance index) = EV/PV ETC (estimate to complete) = (BAC-EV) / CPI = BAC-EV EAC (estimate at completion) = AC + ETC TCPI (To-complete performance index) = (BAC-EV)/(BAC-AC) You will need to apply these formulas for the test, so refer back
  34. 34. to section 14-4c of this book to review abbreviations, when to use each formula, and how to interpret the results You can also expect at least a few questions pertaining to the Integrated Change Control process. Remember that once the project management plan is approved and you have a baseline, any proposed change to schedule, budget, or scope needs to go through the change control process Casa de Paz Development Project This project development has proceeded in unexpected ways. How should progress on various aspects be tracked? How does the initial rental lessen risk? SV = EV-PV SV=EV-PV AC - EV CV = EV/PV SPI = EV/AC CPI = ETC AC EAC
  35. 35. + = EV)/CPI - BAC ( ETC = AC) - EV)/(BAC - (BAC TCPI = CONTEMPORARY PROJECT MANAGEMENT, 4E Timothy J. Kloppenborg Vittal Anantatmula Kathryn N. Wells ‹#› Project Supply Chain Management Chapter 13 ‹#› Chapter 13 Core Objectives: Identify the role of supply chain management in project
  36. 36. management and its importance for ensuring project success. Describe how to plan, conduct, & control project procurements. Chapter 13 Technical Objectives: Describe the various formats for supply contracts and when each is appropriate. Given a project situation, determine which activities, supplies, or services should be purchased; create bid documents; determine criteria you would use to select a seller; & determine which type of contract you would use. Chapter 13 Behavioral Objectives: Explain how to use the contemporary approach to project partnering and collaboration. Super Absorbent Polymer Turf (SAPTURF) “The SAPTURF project required a strong team. Successful commercialization of IP is a long shot, so room for project management error is slim. I realized I would need to compensate for lack of in-house resources. Lack of in-house resources is an advantage! I was free to look for the best resources…” Chris Tetrault, owner and founder, SAPTURF 6 Introduction to Project Supply Chain Management Inter-organizational purchasing- management A supply chain consists of all parties involved in fulfilling a
  37. 37. customer request Integrating SCM into PM can significantly enhance the effectiveness of project management Introduction to Project Supply Chain Management Integration of related functions to acquire needed products and services Purchasing Supply management Procurement Project Supply Chain Management A system approach to managing flows of physical products, information, & funds from suppliers and producers, through satisfaction SCM Components Make-or-buy decision Contract types Collaboration and cooperation System integration Make-or-buy decisions – deciding whether to make something in-house or purchase it from a vendor SCM Factors
  38. 38. The importance of SCM to general project management depends on a number of factors: Value of outsourced products/services relative to value of the project The timing of the work being purchased Capability of the project team Role of the outsourced work in the entire project Number of suppliers required Structure of the procurement supply chain SCM Decisions Distribution network configuration Inventory control in supply chain Logistics Supply contracts Distribution strategies Supply chain integration & strategic partnering Outsourcing & procurement strategies Product design Information technology & decision-support systems Matching internal inadequacies with external experience Project Procurement Management Processes Plan Procurement Management Conduct Procurements Control Procurements Plan Procurement Management Plan for purchasing and acquisition Complete most of project planning first A minimum requirement is the project scope statement Plan procurement management – determining how project procurement decisions, approach, and dealing with sellers will
  39. 39. be accomplished and documented Outputs of Planning Procurement management plan provides guidance for: The procurement statement of work ensures that the contractor and client companies understand the work that is being requested. Procurement management plan– portion of the project management plan that describes how a project team will acquire goods and services they choose to purchase Procurement statement of work – documents the portion of work to be purchased, described in enough detail so potential suppliers can decide if they are capable of and interested in providing it. Acquisition of materials and services Selection of suppliers Types of contracts Risk management issues Make or Buy Decisions Seller may be called a supplier, supplier’s supplier, or contractor Buyer may be called a customer, service requestor, or purchaser A firm’s competitive advantage may be defined as lower cost, better quality, and/or fast delivery Reasons to Make or Buy
  40. 40. Outsourcing Issues Loss of time control Lack of cost control Gradual loss of special skills Loss of project focus Sharing of proprietary knowledge that impacts competitive advantage Potential conflict of interest Ineffective management Loss of confidentiality Double outsourcing Procurement Documents Prospective contractor companies have capability and motivation to provide proposals Procurement documents – documents that define the requirements and contractual relationship between suppliers and customers of services and products used on a project. Project procurement requests Request for Information (RFI) -- “a proposal requested from a potential seller or service provider to determine what products and services are potentially available in the marketplace to meet
  41. 41. a buyer’s needs and to know the capability of a seller in terms of offerings and strengths of the seller.” Request for Quotation (RFQ) – a type of procurement document “used when discussions with bidders are not required (mainly when the specifications of a product or service are already known) and when price is the main or only factor in selecting the successful bidder.” Request for Proposal (RFP) – a type of procurement document used at “an early stage in a procurement process issuing an invitation for suppliers, often through a bidding process, to submit a proposal on a specific commodity or service.” Quotes taken from https://www.tutorialspoint.com/management_concepts/procurem ent_documents.htm Conduct Procurements Sources for Potential Suppliers Approaches Used When Evaluating Prospective Suppliers Supplier Selection Process Conduct procurements – the process which includes receiving seller responses, selecting a seller, and awarding a contract Sources for Potential Suppliers Supplier websites Supplier information files Supplier catalogs Trade journals Phone directories Sales personnel Trade shows Professional organizations and conferences Electronic search engines Published info by local, state, & federal governments
  42. 42. Selecting a Design-Build Contractor Selecting a Design-Build Contractor Exhibit 13.4 continued Approaches Used When Evaluating Prospective Suppliers Supplier surveys Financial condition analysis Third-party evaluations Facility visits Quality ability analysis Delivery ability analysis Supplier Selection Invite suppliers to submit bids Most common procurement document, the RFP, includes: Purchasing overview Basic supplier requirements Technical requirements Managerial requirements Pricing information Appendices
  43. 43. Supplier Selection A choice between alternatives under uncertainty Outcome concerned with price and performance Rate proposals and other supplier characteristics Most important evaluation criterion is typically price Goal is to award a contract to each selected seller Tools and Techniques Used in the Seller Selection Decision Process Weighting system Independent estimates Screening system Seller rating system Expert judgment Proposal evaluation techniques *See Exhibit 13.5 on p.438 in textbook The Contract A legal relationship between parties Seller must deliver what is promised, and buyer must pay Buyer is internal to the organization Seller is external to the team Contract – a mutually binding legal agreement created between buyer and seller Major Contract Components Statement of work Schedule baseline
  44. 44. Period of performance Roles and responsibilities Pricing Payment terms Place of delivery Limitation of liability Incentives Penalties Contract Types Fixed-Price Contracts Firm-Fixed-price (FFP) contracts– a contract in which the seller has to complete the job for the agreed-upon amount of money regardless of the actual cost incurred Firm-fixed-economic-price-adjustment (FP-EPA) contracts – a fixed-rice contract with a clause to protect the seller from conditions such as inflation or commodity cost increases Firm-Fixed-Incentive-Fee (FPIF) contracts– a contract in which the price is fixed as defined by the contract, but the seller can earn an additional amount as incentive if the seller meets defined project metrics Cost-Reimbursable Contracts Cost-plus-award-fee (CPAF) contract – a cost-reimbursable contract that involves payments to the seller for all allowed costs incurred for completed work, plus an award fee based on satisfying certain subjective performance objectives Cost-plus-fixed-fee (CPFF) contract – a type of contract in
  45. 45. which the buyer reimburses the seller for all of the seller’s allowable costs plus a fixed amount of profit (fee) Cost-plus-incentive-fee (CPIF) contract – a type of contract in which the buyer reimburses the seller for the seller’s allowable costs and pays the seller a fee if it meets defined performance criteria such as schedule, cost, and/or performance Time and Material (T&M) Contracts Unit rate for each hour of labor or pound of material is set in the contract Seller charges for what is done to produce the product/service in contract Time and material (T&M) contracts – hybrid contracts containing aspects of both cost-reimbursement and fixed-price contracts, generally used when the deliverable is labor hours and/or amounts of materials Choosing the Right Type of Contract Consider requirements that a buyer imposes on a seller The degree of market competition plays a role Consider risk for the buyer and the seller Consider using a wrap-up A wrap-up, or owner-controlled insurance program (OCIP), is a single insurance policy providing coverage for all project participants, including the owner and all contractors and subcontractors. Choosing the Right Type of Contract Things to consider:
  46. 46. Cost & schedule risk Clarity about scope of work Type & complexity of requirements Cost & price analysis Urgency of requirements Performance period Contractor’s responsibility Contractor’s accounting system Extent of subcontracting Control Procurements Buyers and sellers administer contracts Sellers create performance reports Buyer reviews performance reports Control procurements – includes managing relationships between sellers and customers, monitoring contract performance, and making changes and corrections if needed. Improving Project Supply Chains Project Partnering and Collaboration Third Parties Lean Purchasing Sourcing Logistics Information Project Partnering and Collaboration Partnering is a method for transforming contractual arrangements into a cohesive, collaborative team endeavor with a single set of goals and established procedures for resolving disputes in a timely and cost-efficient manner
  47. 47. Through strategic partnering companies are more likely to access advanced technology, share risks, & improve relative competitiveness Project Partnering and Collaboration Sources of Conflict During Project Purchasing Lower price means cost reduction for buyer, but revenue loss to seller Conflicts of interest predispose owners and contractors to be suspicious of one another’s motives and actions. Conflicts create costly delays and questionable responses Resolving Project Purchasing Conflicts Use project partnering to engage the project owner and contractors Try to increase the baseline of trust and collaboration Sharing Requirements for Effective Project Partnerships
  48. 48. Mutual Goals in Project Partnerships Securing Commitment to Partnering Consider contractors with a mutual interest and expertise in partnership Get the commitment of top management of all involved firms Describe in detail all benefits and how the partnership will work “We” “Us and them” Securing Commitment to Partnering Problem resolution—Solving problems at the lowest level of organizations and having an agreed-upon escalation procedure. Continuous improvement—Endless waste elimination and cost reduction. Joint assessment—Reviewing the partnering process jointly. Persistent leadership—Displaying a collaborative response consistently. Third Parties Mechanisms to grow supply chain performance…Aggregate: Capacity Inventory Transportation Warehousing Information Receivables
  49. 49. Relationships Lean Purchasing Implementation of just-in-time (JIT) tools/techniques in a manufacturing environment Minimize costs Sourcing All processes required for a firm to purchase goods from suppliers. Advantages of good project sourcing decisions: Order aggregation Procurement transactions more efficient Design collaboration Coordinated forecasting and planning Improved customer satisfaction Logistics Work required to move inventory throughout a supply chain Modes of transportation used in supply chains Transportation cost linked to responsiveness of supply chain aims Tradeoff between responsiveness & costs—PM needs to remember which project objectives are most important! Information Information enables management to make decisions over a
  50. 50. broad scope that crosses both functions and firms IT-based information management is crucial to the performance of project supply chains Accurate Accessible Right kind Summary Cooperative relationships improve ability to compete in today’s marketplace Project supply chain management represents a set of proactive responses Organizations must assess need to outsource part of the project work Contracting is used to specify and manage supplier-buyer relationships Purchasing details are legally enforced in the contract Partnering and coordination of purchasing allow a firm to maximize economies of scale in purchasing and reduce transaction costs. Implications for PM in a Networked Organization Model What is a Networked Organization? Identify core competencies unique to your company and focus
  51. 51. on building competitive advantage Build alliances with best-in-class companies An “open” organizational model Business model drives speed and greater value of leveraging resources outside your company PM IN ACTION Implications for PM in a Networked Organization Model Our Approach: Establish a common PM Methodology Have a central point of contact—Communications is key! Establish a Quality Management System (i.e., ISO 9001) Invite strategic partners into business PM IN ACTION PMBOK Exams Some of the questions you will see on the material covered in this chapter will be at least partly based on vocabulary…understand completely the difference between terms such as “cost-plus-award-fee” and “cost-plus-incentive- fee,” as well as when each type of contract may be used and how each type of contract divides risk between buyer and seller. Similar terms are also used in the seller selection process, so know the difference between a Request for Information (RFI); Request for Quotation (RFQ); and Request for Proposals (RFP), and be ready to apply that knowledge to a variety of questions/problems. Casa de Paz Development Project The most fundamental supply chain question is “will Casa de Paz buy or rent and which building”?
  52. 52. Determine the types of professional service organizations to seek as partners. How should partnerships be established with religious communities? Contemporary Project Management Timothy J. Kloppenborg • Vittal Anantatmula • Kathryn N. Wells F O U R T H E D I T I O N Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 MS Project 2016 Instructions in Contemporary Project Management 4e Chapter MS Project 3 MS Project 2016 Introduction
  53. 53. Ribbon, Quick Access Toolbar, view panes, Zoom Slider, Shortcuts, Scheduling Mode Selector Setting Up Your First Project Auto schedule, start date, identifying information, summary row Create Milestone Schedule Key milestones, zero duration, must finish on, information 7 Set Up a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) Understand the WBS definitions and displays Enter WBS Elements (tasks), Create the outline, Insert WBS Code Identifier column, Hide or show subtasks detail 8 Using MS Project for Critical Path Schedules Set Up the Project Schedule Set or update the project start date, Define organization’s working and nonworking time Build the Network Diagram and Identify the Critical Path Enter tasks and milestones, edit the timescale, understand and define task dependencies, assign task duration estimates, identify the critical path, understand the network diagram view Display and Print Schedules
  54. 54. 9 Define Resources Resource views, max units, resource calendars Assigning Resources Basic assignment, modify an assignment Identify Overallocated Resources Resource usage and Detailed Gantt views together Overallocated Resources Finding overallocated resources, dealing with overallocations Crashing a Critical Path Activity 10 Develop Bottom-up Project Budget Assignment costs, task costs, various cost perspectives Develop Summary Project Budget 12 Baseline the Project Plan First time baseline, subsequent baselines, viewing variances 14 Using MS Project to Monitor and Control Projects What Makes a Schedule Useful? How MS Project recalculates based on reported actuals, current and future impacts of variances, define the performance update process (who, what, when)
  55. 55. Steps to Update the Project Schedule Acquire performance data, set and display status date, Enter duration-based performance data, reschedule remaining work, revise future estimates 15 Close Project Creating project progress reports, sharing reports, export a report to MS Excel, archive project work, capture and publish lessons learned Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 PMBOK® Guide 6e Coverage in Contemporary Project Management 4e The numbers refer to the text page where the process is defined. Project management (PM) processes and knowledge areas 10–11 Project life cycle 7–10, 62–64 Projects and strategic planning 33–37 Organizational influences 102–110 Portfolio and program management 37–42
  56. 56. PMBOK® Guide, 6th ed. Coverage Knowledge Areas Initiating Process Group Planning Process Group Executing Process Group Monitoring & Controlling Process Group Closing Process Group Project Integration Management Develop Project Charter 60–79 Develop Project Management Plan 409–410 Direct and Manage Project Work 459–460 Manage Project Knowledge 192–193,
  57. 57. 504–508 Monitor and Control Project Work 460–462 Perform Integrated Change Control 229–232, 462–463 Close Project or Phase 503, 508–511 Project Scope Management Plan Scope Management 211–212 Collect Requirements 212–216 Define Scope 216–220 Create WBS 220–229 Validate Scope 500–501 Control Scope 475–476 Project Schedule Management Plan Schedule Management 246 Define Activities 249–253 Sequence Activities 253–255 Estimate Activity Durations 255–258 Develop Schedule 259–267
  58. 58. Control Schedule 476–480 Project Cost Management Plan Cost Management 329–330 Estimate Costs 330–341 Determine Budget 342–344 Control Costs 345, 476–480 Project Quality Management Plan Quality Management 401–404 Manage Quality 404–406, 469–474 Control Quality 406–409, 469–474 Project Resources Management Plan Resource Management 290–295 Estimate Activity Resources 290 Aquire Resources 138–141 Develop Team 141–157 Manage Team 157–161 Control Resources 476
  59. 59. Project Com- munications Management Plan Communications Management 188–192 Manage Communications 193–199, 465–467 Monitor Communications 467–468 Project Risk Management Plan Risk Management 360–366 Identify Risks 75, 366–368 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 75, 368–372 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis 372–373 Plan Risk Responses 75, 373–377 Implement Risk Responses 464–465 Monitor Risks 463–464 Project Procurement Management
  60. 60. Plan Procurement Management 431–433, 438–441 Conduct Procurements 434–438 Control Procurments 441 Project Stake- holder Management Identify Stakehold- ers 75–77, 178–184 Plan Stakeholder Engagement 184–186 Manage Stakeholder Engagement 187–188 Monitor Stakeholder Engagement 188 Source: Adapted from A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), 6th ed. (Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute, Inc., 2017): 31. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does
  61. 61. not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 Contemporary Project Management ORGANIZE LEAD PLAN PERFORM FOURTH EDITION TIMOTHY J. KLOPPENBORG Xavier University VITTAL ANANTATMULA Western Carolina University KATHRYN N. WELLS Keller Williams Real Estate Australia • Brazil • Mexico • Singapore • United Kingdom • United States Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.
  62. 62. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 This is an electronic version of the print textbook. Due to electronic rights restrictions, some third party content may be suppressed. Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. The publisher reserves the right to remove content from this title at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. For valuable information on pricing, previous editions, changes to current editions, and alternate formats, please visit www.cengage.com/highered to search by ISBN#, author, title, or keyword for materials in your areas of interest. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the eBook version. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part.
  63. 63. WCN 02-200-203 Contemporary Project Management, Fourth Edition Timothy J. Kloppenborg 2019 2015 Cengage Learning Customer & Sales Support, 1-800-354-9706 www.cengage.com/permissions [email protected] 2017947974 978 1 337 40645 1 Cengage Learning 20 02210 40 125 www.cengage.com. www.cengage.com www.cengagebrain.com Printed in the United States of America Print Number: 01 Print Year: 2017
  64. 64. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 MS Project 2016 Instructions in Contemporary Project Management 4e Chapter MS Project 3 MS Project 2016 Introduction Ribbon, Quick Access Toolbar, view panes, Zoom Slider, Shortcuts, Scheduling Mode Selector Setting Up Your First Project Auto schedule, start date, identifying information, summary row Create Milestone Schedule Key milestones, zero duration, must finish on, information 7 Set Up a Work Breakdown Structure (WBS)
  65. 65. Understand the WBS definitions and displays Enter WBS Elements (tasks), Create the outline, Insert WBS Code Identifier column, Hide or show subtasks detail 8 Using MS Project for Critical Path Schedules Set Up the Project Schedule Set or update the project start date, Define organization’s working and nonworking time Build the Network Diagram and Identify the Critical Path Enter tasks and milestones, edit the timescale, understand and define task dependencies, assign task duration estimates, identify the critical path, understand the network diagram view Display and Print Schedules 9 Define Resources Resource views, max units, resource calendars Assigning Resources Basic assignment, modify an assignment Identify Overallocated Resources Resource usage and Detailed Gantt views together Overallocated Resources
  66. 66. Finding overallocated resources, dealing with overallocations Crashing a Critical Path Activity 10 Develop Bottom-up Project Budget Assignment costs, task costs, various cost perspectives Develop Summary Project Budget 12 Baseline the Project Plan First time baseline, subsequent baselines, viewing variances 14 Using MS Project to Monitor and Control Projects What Makes a Schedule Useful? How MS Project recalculates based on reported actuals, current and future impacts of variances, define the performance update process (who, what, when) Steps to Update the Project Schedule Acquire performance data, set and display status date, Enter duration-based performance data, reschedule remaining work, revise future estimates 15 Close Project Creating project progress reports, sharing reports, export a report to MS Excel, archive project work, capture and publish lessons learned Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May
  67. 67. not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 PMBOK® Guide 6e Coverage in Contemporary Project Management 4e The numbers refer to the text page where the process is defined. Project management (PM) processes and knowledge areas 10–11 Project life cycle 7–10, 62–64 Projects and strategic planning 33–37 Organizational influences 102–110 Portfolio and program management 37–42 PMBOK® Guide, 6th ed. Coverage Knowledge Areas Initiating Process Group Planning Process Group Executing Process Group Monitoring &
  68. 68. Controlling Process Group Closing Process Group Project Integration Management Develop Project Charter 60–79 Develop Project Management Plan 409–410 Direct and Manage Project Work 459–460 Manage Project Knowledge 192–193, 504–508 Monitor and Control Project Work 460–462 Perform Integrated Change Control 229–232, 462–463 Close Project or Phase 503, 508–511
  69. 69. Project Scope Management Plan Scope Management 211–212 Collect Requirements 212–216 Define Scope 216–220 Create WBS 220–229 Validate Scope 500–501 Control Scope 475–476 Project Schedule Management Plan Schedule Management 246 Define Activities 249–253 Sequence Activities 253–255 Estimate Activity Durations 255–258 Develop Schedule 259–267 Control Schedule 476–480 Project Cost Management Plan Cost Management 329–330 Estimate Costs 330–341 Determine Budget 342–344 Control Costs 345, 476–480
  70. 70. Project Quality Management Plan Quality Management 401–404 Manage Quality 404–406, 469–474 Control Quality 406–409, 469–474 Project Resources Management Plan Resource Management 290–295 Estimate Activity Resources 290 Aquire Resources 138–141 Develop Team 141–157 Manage Team 157–161 Control Resources 476 Project Com- munications Management Plan Communications Management 188–192 Manage Communications 193–199, 465–467 Monitor
  71. 71. Communications 467–468 Project Risk Management Plan Risk Management 360–366 Identify Risks 75, 366–368 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 75, 368–372 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis 372–373 Plan Risk Responses 75, 373–377 Implement Risk Responses 464–465 Monitor Risks 463–464 Project Procurement Management Plan Procurement Management 431–433, 438–441 Conduct Procurements 434–438 Control Procurments 441 Project Stake- holder
  72. 72. Management Identify Stakehold- ers 75–77, 178–184 Plan Stakeholder Engagement 184–186 Manage Stakeholder Engagement 187–188 Monitor Stakeholder Engagement 188 Source: Adapted from A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide), 6th ed. (Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute, Inc., 2017): 31. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 Brief Contents Preface xx
  73. 73. About the Authors xxix PART 1 Organizing Projects 1 Introduction to Project Management 2 2 Project Selection and Prioritization 32 3 Chartering Projects 60 PART 2 Leading Projects 4 Organizational Capability: Structure, Culture, and Roles 100 5 Leading and Managing Project Teams 136 6 Stakeholder Analysis and Communication Planning 176 PART 3 Planning Projects 7 Scope Planning 210 8 Scheduling Projects 244 9 Resourcing Projects 286 10 Budgeting Projects 328 11 Project Risk Planning 358 12 Project Quality Planning and Project Kickoff 386 PART 4 Performing Projects 13 Project Supply Chain Management 426 14 Determining Project Progress and Results 456 15 Finishing the Project and Realizing the Benefits 498
  74. 74. Appendix A PMP and CAPM Exam Prep Suggestions 522 Appendix B Agile Differences Covered 527 Appendix C Answers to Selected Exercises 532 Appendix D Project Deliverables 537 Appendix E Strengths Themes As Used in Project Management [Available Online] Index 539 v Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 Requirements Documents 13.1 Identify Stakeholders Stakeholder Register Stakeholder
  75. 75. Engagement Assessment Matrix Integration Scope Schedule Cost Quality Resources Communication Risk Procurement Stakeholders 12.1 Plan Procurement Management 11.1 Plan Risk Management 10.1 Plan Communications
  76. 76. Management 9.1 Plan Resource Management 8.1 Plan Quality Management 7.1 Plan Cost Management 6.1 Plan Schedule Management 5.1 Plan Scope Management Duration Estimates Scope Statement Activity List
  77. 77. Milestone List Network 4.1 Develop Project Charter Charter Assumptions Log Cost Baseline Resource Requirements RACI Team Charter Quality Mgt. Plan Communications Matrix Risk Register Bid Documents Make or Buy Analysis 6.5 Develop
  78. 78. Schedule Schedule Baseline 5.2 Collect Requirements 5.4 Create WBS Scope 4.2 Develop Project Management Plan Activities 9.2 Estimate Activity Resources 11.2 Identify Risks 11.3 Perform Qualitative Risk Analysis 11.4 Perform Quantitative Risk Analysis 11.5 Plan Risk
  79. 79. Responses 13.2 Plan Stakeholders Engagement 6.4 Estimate activity Durations 7.3 Determine Budget 7.2 Estimate Costs 6.3 Sequence Activities 1.2 Foundational Elements 2.4 Organizational Systems 3.4 Project Manager Competencies Selecting Projects Project Customer Tradeoff Matrix Life Cycle and Development Approach Elevator Pitch Leader Roles and Responsibilities Project Selection and Prioritization Matrix Project Resource Assignment Matrix
  80. 80. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 11.6 Implement Risk Responses 13.3 Manage Stakeholder Engagement 13.4 Monitor Stakeholder Engagement 4.3 Direct and Manage Project Work 4.4 Manage Project Knowledge Scope Baseline with WBS Resource Histogram
  81. 81. Project Crashing Retrospectives Closure Documents Customer Feedback Transition Plan Scope Backlog Burn Down/Up Charts Quality Reports s Analysis Realizing s PM Plan Baselines Life Cycle and Development Approach 4.7 Close Project or Phase 6.6 Control Schedule Earned Value
  82. 82. Analysis 7.4 Control Costs 5.6 Control Scope 5.5 Validate Scope 8.2 Manage Quality 9.3 Acquire Resources 9.4 Develop Team 9.6 Control Resources 9.5 Manage Team 8.3 Control Quality Change Requests 10.2 Manage Communications 11.7 Monitor
  83. 83. Risks 10.3 Monitor Communications Team Assignments Team Assessments Agendas Minutes Issues Log Meeting Evaluation Progress Report 12.2 Conduct Procurements 12.3 Control Procurements Source Selection Matrix Lessons Learned Register Quality Measurements
  84. 84. 4.6 Perform Integrated Change Control 4.5 Monitor and Control Project Work Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 Contents Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xx About the Authors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xxix PART 1 Organizing Projects CHAPTER 1 Introduction to Project Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
  85. 85. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.1 What Is a Project? 3 1.2 History of Project Management 5 1.3 How Can Project Work Be Described? 6 1.3a Projects versus Operations 6 / 1.3b Soft Skills and Hard Skills 7 / 1.3c Authority and Responsibility 7 / 1.3d Project Life Cycle 7 1.4 Understanding Projects 10 1.4a Project Management Institute 10 / 1.4b Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK®) 10 / 1.4c The PMI Talent Triangle 11 / 1.4d Selecting and Prioritizing Projects 14 / 1.4e Project Goals and Constraints 14 / 1.4f Defining Project Success and Failure 15 / 1.4g Using Microsoft Project to Help Plan and Measure Projects 16 / 1.4h Types of Projects 16 / 1.4i Scalability of Project Tools 17 1.5 Project Roles 17 1.5a Project Executive-Level Roles 18 / 1.5b Project Management-Level Roles 19 / 1.5c Project Associate-Level Roles 20 1.6 Overview of the Book 20 1.6a Part 1: Organizing and Initiating Projects 20 / 1.6b Part 2: Leading Projects 21 / 1.6c Part 3: Planning Projects 21 / 1.6d Part 4: Performing Projects 23
  86. 86. PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 23 Summary 24 Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 24 Chapter Review Questions 25 Discussion Questions 25 PMBOK® Guide Questions 26 Integrated Example Projects 27 Suburban Homes Construction Project 27 Casa DE PAZ Development Project 28 Semester Project Instructions 28 Project Management in Action 29 References 30 Endnotes 31 viii Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it.
  87. 87. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 CHAPTER 2 Project Selection and Prioritization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 2.1 Strategic Planning Process 33 2.1a Strategic Analysis 33 / 2.1b Guiding Principles 34 / 2.1c Strategic Objectives 36 / 2.1d Flow-Down Objectives 37 2.2 Portfolio Management 37 2.2a Portfolios 38 / 2.2b Programs 39 / 2.2c Projects and Subprojects 39 / 2.2d Assessing an Organization’s Ability to Perform Projects 42 / 2.2e Identifying Potential Projects 42 / 2.2f Using a Cost-Benefit Analysis Model to Select Projects 43 / 2.2g Using a Scoring Model to Select Projects 45 / 2.2h Prioritizing Projects 48 / 2.2i Resourcing Projects 48 2.3 Securing Projects 49 2.3a Identify Potential Project Opportunities 50 / 2.3b Determine Which Opportunities to Pursue 50 / 2.3c Prepare and Submit a Project Proposal 51 / 2.3d Negotiate to Secure the Project 51
  88. 88. PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 52 Summary 52 Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 52 Chapter Review Questions 53 Discussion Questions 53 PMBOK® Guide Questions 53 Exercises 54 Integrated Example Projects 55 Casa DE PAZ Development Project 56 Semester Project Instructions 56 Project Management in Action 57 References 58 Endnotes 59 CHAPTER 3 Chartering Projects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 3.1 What Is a Project Charter? 62 3.2 Why Is a Project Charter Used? 63 3.3 When Is a Charter Needed? 64 3.4 Typical Elements in a Project Charter 65 3.4a Title 65 / 3.4b Scope Overview 65 / 3.4c Business Case 66
  89. 89. / 3.4d Background 66 / 3.4e Milestone Schedule with Acceptance Criteria 66 / 3.4f Risks, Assumptions, and Constraints 67 / 3.4g Resource Estimates 69 / 3.4h Stakeholder List 69 / 3.4i Team Operating Principles 69 / 3.4j Lessons Learned 70 / 3.4k Signatures and Commitment 70 3.5 Constructing a Project Charter 70 3.5a Scope Overview and Business Case Instructions 70 / 3.5b Background Instructions 71 / 3.5c Milestone Schedule with Acceptance Criteria Instructions 72 / 3.5d Risks, Assumptions, and Constraints Instructions 75 / 3.5e Resources Needed Instructions 75 / 3.5f Stakeholder List Instructions 75 / Contents ix Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203
  90. 90. 3.5g Team Operating Principles Instructions 77 / 3.5h Lessons Learned Instructions 77 / 3.5i Signatures and Commitment Instructions 78 3.6 Ratifying the Project Charter 79 3.7 Starting a Project Using Microsoft Project 79 3.7a MS Project 2016 Introduction 80 / 3.7b Setting up Your First Project 81 / 3.7c Define Your Project 82 / 3.7d Create a Milestone Schedule 83 PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 88 Summary 88 Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 88 Chapter Review Questions 89 Discussion Questions 89 PMBOK® Guide Questions 89 Exercises 90 Integrated Example Projects 91 Casa DE PAZ Development Project 93 Semester Project Instructions 93 Project Management in Action 93
  91. 91. References 96 Endnotes 97 PART 2 Leading Projects CHAPTER 4 Organizational Capability: Structure, Culture, and Roles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 4.1 Types of Organizational Structures 103 4.1a Functional 103 / 4.1b Projectized 104 / 4.1c Matrix 105 4.2 Organizational Culture and Its Impact on Projects 109 4.2a Culture of the Parent Organization 110 / 4.2b Project Cultural Norms 111 4.3 Project Life Cycles 111 4.3a Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC) Model 112 / 4.3b Research and Development (R&D) Project Life Cycle Model 113 / 4.3c Construction Project Life Cycle Model 113 / 4.3d Agile Project Life Cycle Model 113 4.4 Agile Project Management 114 4.4a What Is Agile? 114 / 4.4b Why Use Agile? 114 / 4.4c What Is an Agile Mindset? 114 / 4.4d What Are the Key Roles in Agile Projects? 115 / 4.4e How Do You Start an Agile Project? 115 / 4.4f How Do You Continue an Agile Project? 115 / 4.4g What Is Needed for Agile to Be Successful? 116
  92. 92. 4.5 Traditional Project Executive Roles 116 4.5a Steering Team 116 / 4.5b Sponsor 117 / 4.5c Customer 119 / 4.5d Chief Projects Officer/Project Management Office 121 4.6 Traditional Project Management Roles 121 4.6a Functional Manager 121 / 4.6b Project Manager 122 / 4.6c Facilitator 124 4.7 Traditional Project Team Roles 126 4.7a Core Team Members 126 / 4.7b Subject Matter Experts 126 x Contents Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. Due to electronic rights, some third party content may be suppressed from the eBook and/or eChapter(s). Editorial review has deemed that any suppressed content does not materially affect the overall learning experience. Cengage Learning reserves the right to remove additional content at any time if subsequent rights restrictions require it. Copyright 2019 Cengage Learning. All Rights Reserved. May not be copied, scanned, or duplicated, in whole or in part. WCN 02-200-203 4.8 Role Differences on Agile Projects 126 PMP/CAPM Study Ideas 128 Summary 128
  93. 93. Key Terms Consistent with PMI Standards and Guides 128 Chapter Review Questions 129 Discussion Questions 129 PMBOK® Guide Questions 129 Exercises 130 Integrated Example Projects 130 Casa DE PAZ Development Project 131 Semester Project Instructions 131 Project Management in …

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