History of social work

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History of social work

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History of social work

  1. 1. “If you cant feed a hundred people, then just feed one.”
  2. 2. Overview About the Profession Origin and History Social Work in the UK Social Work: The Indian Heritage Conclusion
  3. 3. About the Profession Social workers have played an important role in the advancement of human civilization since long ago. They uphold social justice by reducing inequality and promoting human rights. Social workers try to improve the quality of life of unfortunate people in the society and help them realize their true potential. This is done through counseling, mediating between the needy and charitable organizations or the government, and other activities. Social work helps to solve a lot of problems in the society, and it contributes significantly towards the cultural and moral advancement of humankind.
  4. 4. Need to Understand the History
  5. 5.  The diversity of social work represents a great challenge for social work research, education and practice in the rapidly internationalizing and globalizing world. This challenge can be met successfully only with a deep philosophical and historical understanding of the characteristics of a particular country - and welfare regime – including the specific traditions of welfare systems and the position and role of social work within them. Research into the philosophy and history of social work strengthens this understanding through analyzing the conceptual and genealogical fundamentals of the traditions of social work. This kind of research contributes to the theoretical self- conception of social work which is necessary for the development of social work as a modern professional
  6. 6. Origins and Modern Historyof Social Work
  7. 7.  All major religions encourage people to help the poor, and some of these religions were formed thousands of years ago. Therefore, it can be said that social work originated in the ancient times, when human beings started to perform charity work In the western world, the first documented instance of organized social work occurred during the 3rd century, right after the Christian Church was legalized by Roman Emperor Constantine I. The church set up hospitals, poorhouses, orphanages, and homes for the elderly, and these establishments received grants from the Roman Empire. By the 6th century, the church had developed an elaborate system for distributing food and other consumables to the poor Later on, it would encourage the European public to offer
  8. 8.  During the 19th century, the industrial revolution led to a lot of social problems in England and the United States, including poverty, diseases, mental disorders, prostitution, and others. As such, there was a great need for social work. Churches and governments established effective systems and laws to provide assistance for the needy, and many individuals started to form groups and organizations to perform social work. Social work, as a profession, originated in the
  9. 9. Jane Addams, Mother of Social Work
  10. 10.  Jane Addams was one of the first social workers in the US. When she was 27 years old, she visited the Toynbee Hall settlement house in London, and she developed an aspiration to open a similar house in Chicago. In 1889, she partnered with her friend Ellen Starr to set up a settlement house called the Hull-House They gave speeches about the social problems that were plaguing their neighborhood, raised funds, and encouraged young women to become volunteer social workers. After two years, the Hull-House was providing assistance to around 2,000 people every week. As she became more famous in Chicago, she began to take on greater civic responsibilities, such as founding a school of philanthropy, conducting investigations on social problems, and campaigning for peace. For her extraordinary efforts in social work, Jane Addams was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in the year 1931.
  11. 11. Social Work in the UK
  12. 12.  Social upheaval and mass migration contributed significantly to the evolution of social work in the UK. The populations of cities were increasing dramatically during the industrial revolution, and many people were afflicted by poverty and diseases. The UK government responded by offering free treatment in hospitals, and hospital almoners were recruited to help in the treatment of patients. These almoners were regarded as social workers, and their roles began to include other social responsibilities in the following years.
  13. 13.  Social work in the UK developed as a philanthropic activity on the margins of statutory services, social work in the 20th century became increasingly a professional activity, either carried out directly by the state, or carried out by the voluntary sector on its behalf. Social work has been incorporated steadily into statutory mechanisms since its high tide in the 1970s Not only has the state won the right to intervene in the lives of individuals, it has effectively taken control over how this should be carried out and by whom. Voluntary social work agencies cannot now function without some measure of control over their activities by the local authority and by the legislature. Even in the era of „care in the community‟, it is the local authority which inspects voluntary institutions and give out contracts for work on its behalf.
  14. 14. Social Work: The Indian Heritage
  15. 15.  India has a long history of Social Work of which it can be justifiably proud. The concept of concern for others, often in the form of charitable giving, has been enshrined in Hindu scriptures since ancient times In addition to India‟s sacred texts, there have been many historic individuals who have sought to provide help for the vulnerable and those in need. Recent history has given us further examples of individuals who have furthered the cause of Social Work in India. Raja Ram Mohan Roy sowed the seed of social and religious reform in his work for the abolition of Sati, in addition to supporting widow remarriage and women‟s education. Iswar Chandra Vidya Sagar also advocated for widow remarriage and womens education, as well as economic self-reliance and an end to polygamy. Gopal Hari Deshmukh promoted the establishment of dispensaries, maternity homes, and orphanages. M.K. Gandhi worked tirelessly for the upliftment of women and dalits when, alongside his fight for freedom from foreign rule, he also
  16. 16. Development of Social work inIndia
  17. 17. Pre- British Period to 1800 A.D Pre-british system was dominated by caste system, upper caste protected lower caste people in time of same difficulties, some of the important aspects are as follows: ◦ Joint family: it is like a trust sharing common property. It protected aged, children and women. It sarved as a social trust. ◦ Village community: Indian villages were independent in matters of food, clothing and shatter. The whole community used to take each other. ◦ Village Temple:In every village there were temples. People donated money to the temple and under this system socially backward people were protected.
  18. 18. During the British Period Before the advent of the British, Indian practically lived in village. Thus the economy of the village was self-sufficient. But under the British rule only Industries were allowed to develop. These economic and organization change brought down the economic condition of Indians. All the problems are chiefly related with health, housing, child and woman welfare and labour, recreation, crime and social disorganization. Due to these problems the need for organized social work was realized.
  19. 19.  Christian missionaries spread education, brought the theory of equality, which in turn helped the social reforms to attack the evil customs and inequality. Raya Ram Mohan Ray started the brahma samaj, Pandit Ramabhai started the Arya Samaj, Swami Vivekananda established Ramakrishna mission and Annie Besant started home rule movement against British. Late Gandhi did a lot of work in the field of social reform Due to the impact of the western education, and Christian missionaries, a new term of social work
  20. 20. Growth of professional training in India Professional social work is of recent origin in India. During 1900 onwards, those who were engaged in social welfare activities found the need of trained social workers. In India, professional social work owes its origin to a short- term training course on social service organized by the social service league at Bombay. Later, the first school of social work was started in 1936 by Clifford marshal, who was a protestant missionary and worked in Nagpada. He came to Indian in 1925 and felt the need of trained social workers. Later on different schools of social work came into existence in Delhi, Calcutta, herknow, Varanasi, baroda, agra, adaipur
  21. 21. After Independence In the Independent India the source of all welfare service are inherent in the constitution. In order to supervise the social welfare services, the central social welfare Board has been established. The board assists in the improvement and development of social welfare activities Thus, in Indian social work is gradually emerging as a social oriented profession.
  22. 22. Conclusion Social work has come a long way to become an important profession in the modern society. The scope of responsibilities of social work has become wider over the years, and social workers require more extensive training to perform their duties effectively. As social problems grow in the modern society, social work will continue to gain importance around the world.
  23. 23. References http://wiki.answers.com/Q/When_did_social_work_begin_and _who_is_the_founder_of_social_work http://web1.boisestate.edu/socwork/dhuff/history/central/core. htm http://www.maduraimessenger.org/printed- version/2011/september/issues/ http://web.archive.org/web/20071221085300/http://www.socia lwork.ed.ac.uk/social/history.html http://www.scribd.com/fullscreen/14826079?access_key=key- b722i6riz25zyzprdsv

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