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Fundamentals of Agile Product Management

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Fundamentals of Agile Product Management

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Product Managers are the visionaries for both identifying solutions, and innovating for the next big thing. But how does one jump from “I have an idea” to “go live”? There’s lots in between.

By putting you in real-world scenarios, this deck was created for a Hearst-wide division workshop that helped various teams through how they can break down their idea into actionable next steps by borrowing agile methodologies.

Product Managers are the visionaries for both identifying solutions, and innovating for the next big thing. But how does one jump from “I have an idea” to “go live”? There’s lots in between.

By putting you in real-world scenarios, this deck was created for a Hearst-wide division workshop that helped various teams through how they can break down their idea into actionable next steps by borrowing agile methodologies.

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Fundamentals of Agile Product Management

  1. 1. ambreenshussain Fundamentals of Agile Product Management Ambreen Hussain, Product Manager, HDM ahussain@hearst.com
  2. 2. Agenda • Intro • On Agile • The Role of Product Management in Agile • Product Process & Lifecycle • Characteristics of a Product Manager
  3. 3. Background BA, English, The University of Texas at Austin MFA, Design & Technology, Parsons New School for Design
  4. 4. Background Front-End Developer, NBC, elle.com and Sony Product Manager, Sony, General Assembly, Hearst Instructor, Thinkful, Parsons
  5. 5. What I Thrive In • Beautifully Designed Products (that I use) • Inspiring Co-Workers • Solving Problems • Process That Allows For Innovation & Iteration • Open and Transparent Dialogue
  6. 6. Soo… Agile.
  7. 7. Why is it such an obsession?
  8. 8. Here Was the Problem…
  9. 9. Things were slow. 
 There were so many layers.
 It took forever to start and approve anything.
 PEOPLE.WERE.
 ANNOYED.DYING. LOSING IT.
  10. 10. Agile Manifesto 1. Individuals and interactions over processes and tools 2. Working software over comprehensive documentation 3. Customer collaboration over contract negotiation 4. Responding to change over following a plan
  11. 11. Waterfall vs Agile Conception Initiation Analysis Design Construction Testing Deployment Conception Initiation Analysis Design Construction Testing Deployment
  12. 12. Waterfall vs Agile Agile Methodology Waterfall Methodology
  13. 13. FEATURE 1 FEATURE 2 FEATURE 3 FEATURE 3FEATURE 2FEATURE 1 DEPARTMENT 1 DEPARTMENT 2 Agile Team Structure
  14. 14. Agile Team Structure 7 (+/- 2) Cross Functional Team Members Product Owner Scrum Master (Tech Lead)
  15. 15. Agile Software Development • Division of tasks • Division of teams • Short phases of work • Frequent reassessment on specified features • Adaptation of plans
  16. 16. It works!Waterfall vs Agile
  17. 17. It works!Agile Assessment 1. The team knows, for sure, that at any given time they are working on deliverables that have the greatest value for the business. 2. When the implementation team claims to be Done with something, the business stakeholder usually agrees that it is, in fact, done and Accepts it. 3. When something is Accepted, it is sufficiently well-built and well- tested that it would be safe to deploy or ship it immediately. 4. The team delivers Accepted product increments at least monthly. 5. When the product increments are shipped or deployed, the users and customers are generally satisfied.
  18. 18. It works!Agile Assessment 6. If the business stakeholder changes the priorities or the requirements, the implementation team can adapt easily, switching gears to deliver according to the updated business needs within the next iteration. 7. The business stakeholders express confidence that they will get the capabilities they need in a timely manner. 8. The business can recognize real value from the deliverables: each product increment ultimately has a positive impact on the bottom line. 9. The team has been working at the same pace, delivering roughly the same amount every iteration, for a while. 10. The people on the implementation team agree that they could keep working at the current pace indefinitely.
  19. 19. Product Vision Conception Initiation Analysis Design Construction Testing Deployment
  20. 20. Conception / Initiation
  21. 21. Conception • What design problem are you trying to solve? • What could be your initial success metrics?
  22. 22. Conception • Who are your competitors? • What is your competitive advantage?
  23. 23. Analysis
  24. 24. Conception • Market Size • Marketing Tactics • Possible Business Models
  25. 25. Design
  26. 26. Design
  27. 27. User Stories
  28. 28. Agile Workflow
  29. 29. 1. Backlog Grooming • What do we need to prioritize or re-prioritize? • What’s coming up next?
  30. 30. 2. Sprint Planning • Here’s what we committed to completing in our upcoming sprint!
  31. 31. 3. Daily Stand Up • What did you do yesterday? • What are you doing today? • Is anything blocking you from continuing your work?
  32. 32. 4. Sprint Review Show ‘em what you got!
  33. 33. 5. Retrospective • What made you happy? • What was eh? • What made you upset? • What should we do about it!?
  34. 34. Product Owner • user stories • creates mock ups • leads backlog grooming • demos feature or product
  35. 35. Product Manager • supports marketing and sales groups • channel support
  36. 36. Product Lead • roadmap • P&L
  37. 37. Product Owner Product ManagerProduct Lead
  38. 38. Cool. So what are the characteristics that make someone a great Product Owner / Manager / Lead?
  39. 39. History of Product Management • Branding // Marketing & Ethnography Degree • understand user needs • understand where light sales can be improved • be the voice of the brand • try new things You need to empathize. 1930’s Proctor & Gamble Discipline: Ethnography, Marketing & Branding
  40. 40. • place, where to sell • price, for how much • promotion, and how to market • product, develop History of Product Management You need to strategize. 1960’s Harvard Discipline: Business Administration
  41. 41. • Prototype • MVP • UX Design • User Testing, A/B Testing History of Product Management You need to build. 2000’s, Web 2.0 Discipline: Computer Science Design
  42. 42. Today’s Trifecta Design Tech Business
  43. 43. • I think a good product manager is Customer Driven. — Jason Evanish, Founder of Get Lighthouse, Formerly at Kiss Metrics • I’m from the Ben Horowitz school that a Product Manager is the CEO of their product…you’re ultimately responsible for having a winning product. No excuses. — Sara Mauskopf, Director of Product at Postmates. Previously Twitter, YouTube, Google • A positive net promoter score from the engineers and designers you have previously worked with.” — Dave Morin, CEO Path, Formerly Facebook What Makes a Good PM?
  44. 44. • http://pragmaticmarketing.com/resources/expand- your-comfort-zone-a-product-management-quiz-to- point-you-in-the-right-direction- • http://www.brainsnackscafe.com/ Product_Manager_Aptitude_Quiz.php PM Test
  45. 45. Future Quad Design Tech Business Data
  46. 46. ambreenshussain Thank you! Ambreen Hussain, Product Manager, HDM ahussain@hearst.com

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