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CCV AH2 and beyond Consulting

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In today’s competitive and dynamic business environment
sales professionals face significant challenges to
accomplishing their goals. AH2 & Beyond can help sales professionals worldwide overcome those challenges, create “Customer Value”…and maximize profits.

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CCV AH2 and beyond Consulting

  1. 1. CREATING CUSTOMER VALUE AH2 & Beyond Consulting
  2. 2. Creating Customer Value 1-1 Introducing Creating Customer Value In today’s competitive and dynamic business environment sales professionals face significant challenges to accomplishing their goals. These challenges include: • Differentiating their products in a highly competitive market • Succeeding in an environment where it is sometimes difficult to gain meaningful access to customers • Getting past restrictive “gate keepers” One thing is clear: to succeed in this competitive environment you must maximize the results of every interaction with every potential customer…and build on the skills you learned in "Creating Customer Value Selling to achieve even higher levels of success. That’s what the Creating Customer Value workshop is all about… INTRODUCTION 1-1 Introducing Creating Customer Value ■■ 1-4 A Friend in Need Exercise • Moving customers quickly through the "Buying Cycle"
  3. 3. A Friend in Need Exercise One of the most significant challenges you face is getting consistent results with busy, distracted, or indifferent doctors. Creating Customer Value will help you increase your success rate in these short but critical interactions. ABOUT THE EXERCISE During this exercise, we will explore the fundamental concepts of Creating Customer Value through a sales interaction that resembles those you have every day. You will play either a fundraiser for a charity called A Friend in Need or a busy executive responsible for his/her company’s charitable giving. TIMING Prepare: 15 minutes Meeting: 10 minutes Debrief: 10 minutes OBJECTIVES 1. To learn how you typically behave in brief selling situations. 2. To examine how value is built in short sales interactions, and explore skills for improving your ability to do so. 3. To explore the power of key concepts from Creating Customer Value. Introduction Creating Customer Value 1-4
  4. 4. Creating Customer Value 1-5 KEY LESSONS Here are some key lessons from the A Friend in Need exercise: 1. Preparation is critical to selling success, and every sales call should have an objective. 2. It is not unusual to find that the actual situation you encounter with a customer is different from the one that you expected. 3. You will be more successful in all your sales interactions if you plan for the unexpected, and develop Contingency Plans to help you achieve your objective. 4. Applying the principles of Creating Customer Value will help you improve your effectiveness during all of your interactions. Introduction
  5. 5. Creating Customer Value 2-1 The world in which your doctors operate is often frantic, and their priorities can shift quickly. The time you have with them is limited. Because of this, it is critical for you to set clear Sales Call Objectives for every interaction…and then be prepared to “change course” if what you expect to happen on the call is different from what actually happens. High performers understand this, and always do pre-call planning that includes*: • Asking “what do I want to accomplish?” (and setting an objective accordingly) • Reviewing personal call notes (especially as it relates to their progress moving through the call continuum) • Reviewing prescribing data • Reviewing Monthly View/Managed Market data • Developing strategic questions for use during the sales call. 2-5 Skill: Sales Call Objectives ■■ 2-7 Skill: Contingency Plans/Supporting Tactics Plan Enhanced Skills • Sales Call Objectives • Contingency Plans/Supporting Tactics
  6. 6. Creating Customer Value 2-2 PLANNING FOR THE UNEXPECTED In addition to preparing for a successful sales call, high performers go one step further. They ask themselves: • How will I create the optimum conditions for the sales call? • What will I do if I get more time with the customer than I expected? • What will I do if my time gets cut short? • What will I do if they resist my message more than I thought they would? • What is my back-up plan if things don’t go as anticipated? Think of your selling environment as a large city. If you don’t have a road map, it’s easy to get lost or confused by detours and roadblocks. When you have developed good Sales Call Objectives, you’ll be clear on your destination. Once you’ve planned for the unexpected, you’ll have a road map complete with alternate routes to help you overcome the detours and roadblocks along the way. Plan
  7. 7. Creating Customer Value 2-3 COMMON MISTAKES • Failing to do adequate pre-call planning, and to create objectives for every sales call. • Assuming the customer sees the interaction the same way you do. • Failing to prepare for the inevitable shorter- or longer-than expected interaction. • Not being prepared when the customer is more or less receptive to your message than you expected. • Defaulting to “information dumping” when less time is given than expected. • Failing to anticipate the unexpected because “I didn’t have time to plan.” • Assuming that the customer remembers what was said on the previous call. Plan
  8. 8. Creating Customer Value 2-4 Ground Rules for Effective Feedback Janssen’s drive to achieve Performance Excellence includes a commitment to provide ongoing feedback to employees. To make that happen, it is imperative that the culture is feedback rich and based on an environment of trust and respect. This means that all employees need to be receptive to hearing feedback, willing to seek it out, and assume responsibility to provide it to others. Following are the ground rules for delivering effective feedback. These are not only important and relevant for how you will be expected to communicate feedback to your peers in the selling skills workshop, but also at your cycle meetings, during peer coaching sessions and any other opportunities where you can share insights with one another. EFFECTIVE FEEDBACK IS ALWAYS: Specific and behavioral: Feedback should always describe the situation or context in which the behavior occurred as well as the specific behaviors that support your observation. Behaviors should include the characteristics, observable actions, verbal and non-verbal behaviors that indicate either a strength or developmental opportunity. Example: Active listening was not demonstrated when customer Hartford was answering your questions. (the situation) You moved quickly from question to question without stopping to listen to his/her answers. Instead you just answered “ok” and moved on to your next question. Also, as you began to speak more quickly and moved closer and closer to the customer he began to back away from you. (the behaviors) Tied to Impact: Feedback is most effective when specific behaviors are linked to the outcome of the action. Consider impact factors such as influence on a physician’s prescribing behavior, effect on other people, and the overall effectiveness of the behavior. Example: Active listening was not demonstrated when customer Hartford was answering your questions. (the situation) You moved quickly from question to question without stopping to listen to his/her answers. Instead you just answered “ok” and moved on to your next question. Also, as you began to speak more quickly and moved closer and closer to the customer he began to back away from you. (the behaviors). Consequently, customer Hartford began to ignore your questions, looked at his watch and closed the meeting down. You lost the opportunity to better understand when and why he prescribes Product P and could not tailor your presentation to meet his needs. As a consequence you were unable to close him for additional business. Plan
  9. 9. Creating Customer Value 2-5 Balanced: Feedback should focus on both strengths that the individual can leverage and areas that need to be developed or improved at this time. Regardless of whether feedback is positive or constructive, it should follow the ground rules for delivering effective feedback. Candid: Consider well-delivered and helpful feedback a gift. This means that feedback needs to be communicated with an appropriate balance between sensitivity to the individual and directness so that the message is clear and mutually understood. Respectful: When feedback is delivered in an environment that shows fundamental trust and respect for the individual it allows for appropriate candor and reduces the need for defensiveness on the part of the feedback recipient. Plan
  10. 10. Creating Customer Value 2-6 Skill: Sales Call Objectives WHAT MAKES FOR AN EFFECTIVE SALES CALL OBJECTIVE? A Sales Call Objective basically answers the question: “At the end of this call, what do I want the customer to do?” All good Sales Call Objectives are comprised of the following three components. They are: • Clear: Your objective is specific and unambiguous. • Behavioral: When your objective is achieved, you will “know it when you see it,” and the customer will have done something for the benefit of his/her patient. • Obtainable: Your objective is realistic, given the situation. COMMON PITFALLS It’s not unusual to see call objectives that don’t meet these criteria. Here are some examples: Not Clear: Talk to customer Jones about Product A, Product R, Product P, and Product S. Also, get his thoughts on a study that involves 2,500 patients and ask how he decides amongst atypical anti-psychotics. Not Behavioral: Show customer Brown how Product P is more effective than Product Z when treating positive and mood symptoms associated with schizophrenia. Not Obtainable: Switch all of customer Smith’s bi-polar mania patients to Product P. Cl ear Beha vioral O btainabl e Plan
  11. 11. Creating Customer Value 2-7 CONTENT: WHAT TO INCLUDE IN YOUR SALES CALL OBJECTIVE As you develop your Sales Call Objectives, make sure you consider the following content guidelines: When appropriate, include reference to: What to do: Call Continuum Reflect where you are in the sales life cycle with the customer Market Share Reflect your prescribing goal Multi-Product Opportunities As appropriate, mention multiple products Plan
  12. 12. Creating Customer Value 2-8 Skill: Contingency Plans/SupportingTactics ABOUT THE SKILL Sometimes your sales calls don’t go the way you planned them. You may have less time than you anticipated…or more. The customer may be more favorably inclined to your message than you expected…or less favorably inclined. To succeed, you need to be ready for these unexpected situations with Contingency Plans. The skill of developing Contingency Plans is not difficult, but it is rarely practiced. We know we should have them, but we seldom go to the trouble of actually creating them. • A Contingency Plan can be as simple as “if this doesn’t work, try that.” • Contingency Plans anticipate possible disruptions or objections to your original plan. • Having a Contingency Plan provides you with flexibility should your sales call go better, longer, shorter, or worse than you expected. The Role of Supporting Tactics Your Contingency Plan should be made up of Supporting Tactics that help you move closer to achieving your Sales Call Objective. For example: • If you find that you have less time than you need, you might ask for an alternate “time slot” in the customer's calendar where you can close on your Sales Call Objective, or • If you find that the customer is more resistant to your message than you anticipated, you might ask him/her to review a research study in anticipation of prescribing your product after your next sales call. Plan
  13. 13. Creating Customer Value 2-9 SUPPORTING TACTICS: TOOLS FOR “MOVING THE BALL DOWN THE FIELD” Your sales strategy in calling on a customer is like the general strategy for playing a football game. Your ultimate goal is to score points by crossing the goal line, to become the market leader. Sometimes you cross the goal line quickly with a few great “plays.” But typically you need a number of “plays,” some more successful than others, to move the ball down the field. In the same way, you would like to thoroughly sell all products to a customer on every sales call, but sometimes what is required is a series of smaller commitments that get you to closing to achieving your ultimate goal. Market Leader Prescribe first, and tell other doctors about his/her experience with your drug Prescribe first for appropriate patient type Try sample on one patient Not Market Leader 1010 2020 3030 4040 5050 4040 3030 2020 1010 Prescribe for a few patients SupportingTactics to AchieveYour Sales Call Objectives • Sales aids • Reprints • Speaker programs • Dinners • Etc. Plan
  14. 14. Creating Customer Value 2-10 DEVELOPING CONTINGENCY PLANS Now that you understand the concept of Contingency Plans, how do you actually create them? As you can see in the worksheet below, you should start by creating a Sales Call Objective for your sales call…as you expect it to occur. Next, determine the one or two most likely “unexpected” situations you might encounter and create Contingency Plans for them. Ask yourself: “How would my approach change if I found myself with more or less time than expected, or if the customer is either more or less receptive to my message?” Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics More Than Expected Less Than Expected Available Time More Than Expected Sales Call Objective (What you want the customer to do)Customer's Receptivity to My Message Plan
  15. 15. Creating Customer Value 2-13 EXERCISE: C REATING A CONTINGENCY PLAN FOR YOUR CHALLENGING customer Plan customer:________________________________________________ Customer's Background PositionYour Sales Call Objective (What you say to the customer) Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics More Than Expected Less Than Expected Available Time More Than Expected Sales Call Objective (What you want the customer to do)Customer's Receptivity to My Message
  16. 16. Creating Customer Value 2-14 KEY LESSONS 1. To sell effectively in a highly competitive market, it is important to be assertive, and to “move the ball down the field” in every sales interaction. 2. Every call should have a clear, behavioral, obtainable Sales Call Objective. 3. Sales Call Objectives should also be market share focused, reflect where you stand in the call continuum, and support the selling of more than one product. 4. Given the dynamic nature of your selling environment, it is critical to have Contingency Plans to help you move you towards achieving your objectives. 5. The most successful representatives formulate Contingency Plans for longer- and shorter- than expected meetings and/or sales calls in which the other party is more or less receptive to their message than anticipated 6. Some representatives are not able to come up with Contingency Plans spontaneously. Having a brief, pre-call planning routine which outlines your Contingency Plans is important. 7. You can use these skills not just for CEO sales calls, but for your interactions with the whole treatment team. Plan
  17. 17. Creating Customer Value 2-15 APPLICATION QUESTIONS In order to create quality Contingency Plans, ask yourself the following questions: 1. What are the different situations I might encounter? 2. Given these different situations, what specific outcomes can I foresee? 3. In these same situations, what is the most desirable outcome? 4. What Supporting Tactics will I use if I end up with more (or less) time for this interaction than I originally planned for? 5. What is my Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactic if the customer is more (or less) receptive to my message than I expected? Plan
  18. 18. Creating Customer Value 3-1 To sell competitively, we need a compelling message in every CEO interaction. Selling time is limited. Every word counts, especially the first words we speak on each sales call. To be prepared, we need good answers to two key questions: “Who should I approach?” and “How should I approach them?” WHO SHOULD I APPROACH? Everyone in an office has impact on patient lives. Even though Customers ultimately write the prescriptions, developing product allies throughout the office helps get the message to the CEO when you’re not there yourself. Here are some other members of the patient care team*: • Receptionist • Buyer • CEO • CFO • Office Manager 3-3 Skill: Position the Sales Call Objective ■■ Approach Enhanced Skill • Position the Sales Call Objective
  19. 19. Creating Customer Value 3-2 HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THEM? Customers and other members of the patient care team are extremely busy. They are approached every day by sales representatives selling competing products. They are often “stressed out,” distracted, and tired. Because of this, it’s not enough to simply share your Sales Call Objective at the start of the meeting. You must quickly send a message that that also answers three key questions: • “What do you want from me?” • “Will you waste my time?” • “What value do you bring me and my patients today?” That’s what Positioning the Sales Call Objective is all about… Approach
  20. 20. Creating Customer Value 3-3 Skill: Position the Sales Call Objective ABOUT THE SKILL To Position the Sales Call Objective means quickly articulating the purpose of your call…in a way that maximizes the receptivity of your customer. Too many sales representatives assume their customer views the interaction the same way they do. Frequently they begin a call without focusing the Customer's attention on the topic or subject at hand. Sometimes they simply state their Sales Call Objective and then begin presenting. They then run the risk of having the customer “singing off a different sheet of music.” Positioning the Sales Call Objective doesn’t take a lot of time. It typically takes less than 15 seconds, and pays large dividends in capturing a busy Customer's attention. Keep these ideas in mind: • When you Position the Sales Call Objective properly, the customer quickly knows where the conversation is intended to go…and that you don’t intend to waste his/ her time. • If you Position the Sales Call Objective and the customer resists or disagrees, it gives you the signal to move to your Contingency Plan. The “trick” in doing a good job of Positioning the Sales Call Objective is to assure that your description of the purpose of the meeting overlaps something that is important to the customer. This flows out of your personal selling style research, pre-call preparation, or conversations with other representatives who call on the customer. Approach
  21. 21. Creating Customer Value 3-4 CRITERIA: POSITION THE SALES CALL OBJECTIVE There are four criteria you can use to determine if you are Positioning the Sales Call Objective effectively: Your Sales Call Objective How you will Position the Sales Call Objective Effectively Positioned Sales Call Objective Clear, Behavioral, Obtainable Communicates a patient benefit Overlaps their agenda Approach
  22. 22. Creating Customer Value 3-6 KEY LESSONS 1. Given how busy and distracted doctors are, it is critically important that sales representatives capture and focus the Customer's attention in these brief interactions. 2. The trick to Positioning Your Sales Call Objective well is to figure out the overlap between your objectives and the Customer's interests or needs. 3. Positioning the Sales Call Objective is essentially the skill of telling the customer the purpose of the interaction in a brief, concise way. 4. This skill is usually not performed “on the fly” but requires a moment of thoughtful planning before engaging the customer. Approach
  23. 23. Creating Customer Value 3-7 APPLICATION QUESTIONS 1. What am I trying to accomplish in this sales call? 2. What do I know about what is important to the customer? 3. How does my Sales Call Objective overlap this Customer's top concerns? 4. What is the ideal context for the upcoming interaction? 5. How can I briefly describe the purpose of this sales call so that it captures the Customer's attention? 6. How would I Position the Sales Call Objective differently if I had to switch to one of my Contingency Plans? Approach
  24. 24. Creating Customer Value 4-1 The ability to sell the value of your drug is greatly enhanced when you know more about the customer, his or her needs, practice profile, prescribing habits, concerns or issues. The better you can uncover the subtle or less-apparent motivation of the customer, the better you can sell to it. But with dozens of representatives calling on the customer every week, the time he/she wants to spend educating representatives is understandably small. Most representatives have been taught about the importance of asking questions and gathering information from doctors, but are faced with the same challenges of limited time and too many representatives. How do high performers gain the upper hand in this difficult set of circumstances? They ask better questions: • They plan questions beforehand that support their Sales Call Objective. • They go beyond the simple closed and open questions most representatives ask. • They differentiate themselves from other representatives by asking more intrinsically interesting questions. • They get data other representatives don’t, because they have superior question-asking skills. • They find out nuances of motivation from the customer, that lets them better sell the value of their products. 4-4 How to Do It: Questioning Model* ■■ 4-6 Stage 2 Questions ■■ 4-13 Paraphrase and Test ■■ 4-15 Video Application Clinic I Interview Enhanced Skills • Stage 2 Questions • Paraphrase and Test
  25. 25. Creating Customer Value 4-2 COMMON MISTAKES • Asking rote, simplistic, or obvious questions of a busy customer • “Dumping” data about product when there is not enough time to educate the customer effectively • Telling rather than asking…or asking the same (boring) questions as competitors • Asking questions that get the customer to share information, but fail to encourage him/her to think about your product in a new or different way • Interrupting customers while the customer is attempting to respond • Providing multiple-choice answers. For example,“customer, what’s important to you?Is it managed care, time, or patient compliance?” • Asking questions that you already know the answer to. Interview
  26. 26. Creating Customer Value 4-3 CAN YOU ANSWER THE KEY QUESTIONS? In Creating Customer Value Selling workshop you learned that salespeople sometimes assume that they know their customers. It’s often useful to take a step back and ask yourself,“How well do I really know my customers?” Can you answer the following questions? • What’s important to this customer? Why? • With what type of patients does he/she use my drug (or the competitions’)? • What issues/challenges does he/she encounter when treating a disease state specific to my drug (or the competitions’)? • Why does he/she use my drug (or my competitions’)? If you have trouble answering these questions, consider this: you have an opportunity to ask them when you get back in your territory. There might be times when your physician’s change their prescribing habits or treatment algorithms. This might be an appropriate time to ask these “what” and “why” questions to uncover needs/motivation. There is so much emphasis on asking questions. The purpose is not to ask a question just to ask a question. The purpose is to uncover a need/motivation. If your questions are to the point and specific to uncovering needs, your sales calls will be much more effective. Interview
  27. 27. Creating Customer Value 4-4 How to Do It: Creating Customer Value Selling Questioning Model* ASK Ask well- thought out strategic questions LISTEN Listen to your customers’ response. If you are uncertain of the response, ask.“Can you clarify?” RESPOND This is critical; you will begin to target your sell to the customer’s wants/needs or close based on buy-in signals. SILENCE There will be uncomfortable silence, however, they need to think of an answer to your question before they respond. Interview
  28. 28. Creating Customer Value 4-5 Interview THE DO’S AND DON’TS OF GOOD QUESTIONING* DO’S DON’TS • Interrupt • Ask closed-ended (“yes-no”) questions • Ask a multiple choice question • Ask the same question every visit • Ask a question you know from your resources (what agent do you use?) • Plan questions based on previous call • Target toward customer/patient needs • Document specific call notes based on customer comments • Listen to the response USING CLARIFYING QUESTIONS TO GET DEEPER* At times, the most important questions to ask are clarifying questions. When you are uncertain about what your customer has just said, ask questions like these: • “Tell me more about that…” • “Why is that?” • “What exactly do you mean?” • “What patient type?” • “Can you clarify?” • “How often have you experienced that?” • “Why do you feel that way?” *Note: This material is adapted from Janssen Pharmaceutica and Creating Customer Value Selling . Creating Customer Value Selling is a registered trademark of Integrity Systems® .
  29. 29. Creating Customer Value 4-6 Skill: Stage 2 Questions ABOUT THE SKILL Asking Stage 2 Questions enables you to get a more subtle understanding of the issues driving a Customer's treatment approach. In effect, your questions encourage the customer to think about important medical issues in new and more thought-provoking ways. • Stage 2 Questions encourage the other party to compare, rank, envision, share feelings, or analyze the information they already have in new and/or creative ways. • Stage 2 Questions uncover new information for you and for the person answering the question. • Stage 2 Questions are designed to intrigue the other party and will often differentiate you from your competitors. Interview
  30. 30. Creating Customer Value 4-7 KEY LESSONS 1. Asking better, more provocative questions can motivate a customer to give you the information you need. 2. Understanding the underlying treatment issues in a Customer's practice is key to knowing how to help that customer see more value in your product. 3. Successful representatives are able to overcome the “questioning fatigue” that doctors experience due to the number of representatives that call on them. 4. Asking better questions is crucial to differentiating yourself from your competition. 5. Stage 2 Questions: • Help you gather better information. • Move you to a more sophisticated level of interaction with the other party. • Create value by bringing a new frame of reference to your conversation. • Create openings for follow-up conversations. • Differentiate you from other representatives competing for the Customer's “mind share.” • Uncover deeper levels of what motivates or is important to the customer. • Focus the customer on information that gives you a competitive advantage. 6. Use clarifying questions to help you gain a deeper understanding of your customer’s motivations and needs. Interview
  31. 31. Creating Customer Value 4-8 Interview Your goal: What others do when answering your questions: The results: To prompt the other party to share existing information about the situation, problems, implications, needs, and benefits of a potential solution. Inform Explain Relate Educate Share Treatment Protocol You understand the situation more thoroughly. The other party feels that they have educated you. To prompt the other party to create new information, especially about their motivations and needs. Compare Rank Envision Share Feelings Analyze You and the other party gain new insight about the situation. The other party feels that you have added new value that did not exist before. STAGE 2 QUESTIONS: WHAT MAKES THEM DIFFERENT? Most sales professionals understand the importance of asking good questions during the sales call. To take this skill to the next level when uncovering a Customer's needs or motivations, you go beyond asking regular open questions (which we call Stage 1 Questions), and make more sophisticated inquiries using Stage 2 Questions. STAGE 1 QUESTIONS STAGE 2 QUESTIONS
  32. 32. Prioritizing Comparative Hypothetical Emotive Provocative Get the other party to share the relative importance or intensity of his/her needs. Get the other party to step back, expand their perspective on the problem, think more imaginatively, or consider alternatives that might meet underlying needs. Get the other party to examine a situation from a different point of view. Get the other party to talk about feelings and clarify emotional needs in the situation. Get the other party to analyze new or interesting information. “customer, the classic cluster of symptoms for this disease are X, Y, and Z. Could you rank order for me the incidence of those symptoms among your patients, and your opinion as to why they occur in this proportion in your practice?” “I know that you are prescribing both my drug and ABC. Could you compare and contrast for me the kinds of patients you prescribe each for and why?” “Suppose you were to create the perfect drug for Alzheimer's disease? What would that look like?” “How do you feel about prescribing drugs that are not first to market?” “customer, what are your thoughts about the recent U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on… (the limitations of HMOs, etc.)?” Creating Customer Value 4-9 THE FIVE TYPES OF STAGE 2 QUESTIONS TYPE GOAL EXAMPLES Interview
  33. 33. Creating Customer Value 4-10 APPLICATION QUESTIONS To formulate the most effective Stage 2 Questions, ask yourself the following: 1. How impatient is this customer when I approach him/her for information? 2. What information do I already have that I can build a Stage 2 Question around? 3. Based on what I know about this customer, which type of Stage 2 Question will be the most effective? 4. If I have limited time with this customer, what Stage 2 Question can I ask that will create an opportunity to discuss the answer at a later date? 5. If I ask this customer a good Stage 2 Question and he/she responds, what good Open Questions will I use to follow up? 6. Do I already know the answer to the question I want to ask? BENEFITS OF INTERVIEWING WITH STAGE 2 QUESTIONS • You are more likely to uncover new information about the Customer's motivation which can lead to new selling opportunities. • They do not feel as though their time has been wasted or that they are being “sold.” • The other party may learn something new about him/herself. • You get data your competitor doesn’t have. • You are seen as a more valuable resource. • With better data, your solutions can be more robust. Interview
  34. 34. STAGE 2 QUESTIONS: PRACTICE SCENARIOS During this exercise you will have the opportunity to create Stage 2 Questions for use with a customer or other medical professional in a typical sales situation. The instructor will explain how the exercise works. ROUND ONE YOUR STAGE 2 QUESTIONS Scenario You are calling on a customer who prescribes about equal amounts of _____, _____, and _____. ROUND TWO YOUR STAGE 2 QUESTIONS Scenario You have a good relationship with a customer who says he likes you and your products, but who only prescribes a very small amount of them. Creating Customer Value 4-11 Interview
  35. 35. CHALLENGING customer YOUR STAGE 2 QUESTIONS customer ______________________ 1. 2. 3. Creating Customer Value 4-12 Interview
  36. 36. Creating Customer Value 4-13 Skill: Paraphrase andTest ABOUT THE SKILL When you Paraphrase and Test you paraphrase the general content, ideas and feelings expressed by your customer…and then check to make sure you heard the customer accurately. The Paraphrase and Test behavior is important for clarifying mutual understanding as well as clarifying areas of disagreement, making the other person feel valued, and building trust. When you use this skill you not only clarify your understanding of the customer’s needs, but also: • build mutual trust and enhance the relationship • help make customers feel they are understood • confirm areas of agreement and disagreement • uncover customer objections to your product Creating Customer Value Selling CONNECTION* The Paraphrase and Test skill is an important component to overcoming customer objections. As you recall from Creating Customer Value Selling workshop, the Negotiate Model for overcoming objections has four parts: 1. Listen 2. Paraphrase 3. Clarify 4. Respond Interview
  37. 37. Creating Customer Value 4-14 HOW PARAPHRASE AND TEST WORKS YOUR GOALS TYPICAL WORDS TIPS FOR SUCCESS Interview Accurately paraphrase what the other party has said …and test to make sure you paraphrased correctly So what you are saying is _____. If I understand your viewpoint, you feel _____. ...did I get that right? Avoid “Yes, but…” Be sincere Don’t embellish or manipulate Test your paraphrase: make sure you heard the other party accurately
  38. 38. Creating Customer Value 4-15 Video Application Clinic I ABOUT THE EXERCISE Each participant in the Creating Customer Value workshop will have two chances to practice, on camera, the skills learned in class, and receive feedback on those skills. You will be given a realistic Janssen Pharmaceutica customer situation on which to practice your skills. PREPARATION • Prepare your role: 15 minutes • “Dry run” role play with a partner: 7 minutes each VIDEO • Sales call: 4–5 minutes • Feedback: 9–10 minutes • Transition to next round: 1 minute PROCESS • “customer” should provide realistic resistance • “Sales representative” should use all the skills noted on the role play prep form • Each “Observer” should use Feedback Form to record and evaluate performance on one of the following: — Positioning the Sales Call Objective — Stage 2 Questions — Paraphrase and Test — Especially effective use of any given skill • DM assigns “Observer” roles, runs video, keeps time, manages discussion, and hands participant written feedback form at the end of role play Interview
  39. 39. Creating Customer Value 5-1 A Friend in Need Revisited ABOUT THE EXERCISE So things didn’t go according to plan in the first call that the fundraiser made on the marketing manager at Banana Computer. That’s the way it often goes for Janssen sales representatives as well. Let’s take another look at the opportunity this fundraiser has to sell the value of his organization to Banana Computer. TIMING Prepare: 10 minutes Meeting: 10 minutes Debrief: 15 minutes OBJECTIVES 1. To experience various ways that representatives shape the perception of the value of things they bring to the sale. 2. To explore additional tools for gaining commitment from doctors and others. 3. To practice additional closing skills. 5-1 A Friend in Need Revisited ■■ 5-3 Creating Customer Value Selling : Pop Quiz ■■ 5-4 Features and Benefits ■■ 5-5 Creating Customer Value Selling Review: Using Sales Aids* ■■ 5-6 Skill: Framing ■■ 5-9 Commitment Drivers Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate Enhanced Skills • Features and Benefits • Framing • Commitment Drivers
  40. 40. Creating Customer Value 5-2 Because value is subjective, the words we use and the actions we take to describe our products can have a tremendous impact on how they are perceived. High performers ask themselves: • How can I describe what I’m sharing right now to maximize its perceived value? • What value do I want the other party to focus on during this interaction? High performers understand this and intuitively shape value during their interactions and are able to more effectively: • Demonstrate: sharing product features that meet the customer’s needs • I validate: ensuring that the information provided benefits • Negotiate: overcoming customer objectives COMMON MISTAKES To be successful in our sales discussions we capture the Customer's attention and create value for what we have to offer. Mistakes to avoid include: • Assuming that the person we wish to influence sees the product or service the same way we do. • Trying to influence another person’s behavior by giving them a laundry list of reasons. • Failing to create a focus on the most important aspects of what is being said/offered. Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  41. 41. Creating Customer Value 5-4 Creating Customer Value Selling Review: Using Sales Aids* Effective use of sales aids is critical to creating value during your sales calls. Here are proven “do’s and don’ts” for getting the most from a sales aid: DO’S DON’TS Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate • Read the entire piece to the customer • Give control of the piece to the customer • Overwhelm the customer with your resources • Negate the value of your pieces • Write on or mark up pieces • Hold it so the customer can see it • Know the content to avoid fumbling • Point to graphics, not text • Use a pointer or a pen • Make eye contact • Emphasize key points • Translate features and benefits into the Customer's terms
  42. 42. Creating Customer Value 5-5 Features and Benefits A basic concept in selling is the importance of the salesperson getting clear in his/her mind about the difference between selling “features” and selling “benefits.” Customers typically aren’t interested in the features of your product; they are interested in the benefits. Said differently, features tell and benefits sell. It has been said that people don’t go to the hardware store to buy a drill bit; they go to buy a hole in a board. People don’t go to the store to buy laundry detergent; they go to buy clean clothes. They are interested in how something benefits them, not the features of your product or service. The same thing is true in the pharmaceutical profession. At some level, doctors are not interested in deciliters or absorption into the blood stream; they are interested in how a particular drug benefits their patients. Of course, there are strict legal requirement about making product claims and how sales representatives are able to talk about their drugs. However, an important part of the sales representative’s job is to hear the benefits that a customer is looking for in drugs he/she prescribes, and suggesting how those benefits might link to the specific features of anygiven formula. For instance, a customer might be concerned about his patients overdosing because they don’t see immediate relief of symptoms after the first dose. It would be the representative’s job to be intimately familiar with product features so that he/she could talk knowledgeably about how long the clinical studies indicate a given drug takes to get into the bloodstream. When the representative understands and can see the link between the feature and the possible benefit of the product, he/she will be better able to know what kinds of questions to ask the customer. Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  43. 43. Creating Customer Value 5-6 Skill: Framing ABOUT THE SKILL An artist examines a landscape and decides which elements he/she wishes to include or exclude for the painting. Like the artist, you can selectively choose what you would like to emphasize during your interactions. This is called Framing: the skill of analyzing the situation, and verbalizing the most favorable context or frame of reference for influencing the other party to achieve your objective. Note that: • You use Framing to shape the value of the various items at your disposal such as samples or patient education materials. • The most powerful frames create a context that allows you to achieve your objective by coupling your agenda to the needs and interests of the customer. • Framing provides you greater opportunity to control the things the other party will pay attention to during your interactions. Framing applies to Creating Customer Value in two important ways: 1. When giving away promotional items, literature, or samples, you should use Framing to create a context of value for these items. This will increase the likelihood that you will elicit a more desirable outcome from the recipient. 2. Once you understand the needs of the other party you should Frame the meeting (i.e., Position the Sales Call Objective) to create an overlap between what you want to accomplish and what is important to the other party. FRAMING: HERE’S HOW IT’S DONE The Framing skill creates optimal value for your products and “value-adds.” Here’s how it’s done: • Know what’s important to the other party • List all the characteristics of the product “value-add” that might appeal to the other party • Share only the best combination of these two. Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  44. 44. Creating Customer Value 5-7 KEY LESSONS 1. Value is a creation and you are the creator. 2. Value is in the mind of the other party. 3. You have a variety of items that doctors, nurses, clinicians, pharmacists, receptionists, and others find helpful, useful, or desirable. 4. Additionally, these people have things that you want: access, information, in-person meeting time, referrals, scripts, etc. 5. There are many ways to describe the things we offer a customer. Some create perceived value better than others. Your job is to find the best approach for each interaction. 6. By Framing the value of your items more effectively, you may be able to get the customer or other party to make commitments which move him/her to your goal of increasing prescriptions. Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  45. 45. Creating Customer Value 5-8 APPLICATION QUESTIONS In order to properly apply Framing to your daily sales interactions, ask yourself the following questions: 1. What is my Sales Call Objective for this interaction? 2. Where is the overlap between what I am trying to accomplish on this sales call and the needs of the other party? 3. What are the different ways I can Frame the value of something I have to offer the other party? 4. Which of these Frames will be most effective in helping me reach my Sales Call Objective? 5. How does this person usually Frame the interaction with me? 6. If needed, how could I turn that Framing around? Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  46. 46. Creating Customer Value 5-9 Commitment Drivers Most people cannot handle the virtual flood of information coming at them and unconsciously screen information. Social science research indicates that when people don’t have enough time or data to make decisions in their usual fashion, they take predictable “shortcuts.” • Doctors use these shortcuts in their decision-making process in order to maintain their hectic schedules. Commitment Drivers are ways to use these shortcuts to help you take advantage of the Customer's natural thought process. • There are six Commitment Drivers: — Scarcity — Deadline — Authority — Conformity — Bargain — Competition KEY LESSONS 1. When you understand decision-making shortcuts used by a customer, you can use them to shape value during your sales calls. 2. There are six different Commitment Drivers. The better you understand the other party, the more effectively you can utilize them to reach your Sales Call Objectives. 3. Used consistently, Commitment Drivers will increase the frequency with which doctors and others agree to your requests. Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  47. 47. When something is perceived as rare or in short supply, the other party will be more motivated to take action to get it. If the other party feels that a valuable opportunity will shortly be unavailable, they will be more motivated to act now to acquire it. When a credible expert (such as a well-known CEO or organization) addresses a course of action, the other party will feel that taking action is less risky. Sometimes closure can be accelerated by pointing out that,“Everyone is doing it.” “These invitations are going quickly. I only have one left.” “I have to finalize the reservations by tonight for the dinner at which customer Jones from the University is speaking. Should I put you on the list?” “customer Smith, Head of Surgery at the University Medical Center, said that this product yields better results for her patients than anything else she has tried.” “Other large internal medicine practices have been using _____ with great results.” Scarcity Deadline Authority Conformity Creating Customer Value 5-10 DEFINITIONS AND EXAMPLES COMMITMENT DRIVER DEFINITION EXAMPLE Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  48. 48. Many people take action (when they otherwise might not), simply because “it was too good a deal to pass up.” Injecting an element of competition can often accelerate closure… especially if this is coupled with scarcity. “I will do an inservice for your staff over lunch. On top of training your whole staff in one shot, it can be completed over the lunch hour so it will not take away from patient time. “I only have five Product A rebate coupons left and I know several doctors down the street that would like to have them. How many coupons do you need?” Bargain Competition Creating Customer Value 5-11 COMMITMENT DRIVER DEFINITION EXAMPLE Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  49. 49. Creating Customer Value 5-12 APPLICATION QUESTIONS 1. Based on what I know about this customer, which of the Commitment Drivers might work best? 2. How can I use Framing to create a sense of competition, scarcity, or bargain around my value-add? 3. What ways might I create a sense of urgency in the mind of this customer? 4. How might I appeal to a respected authority or create a sense that “everyone is doing it” to motivate commitment? 5. How might I combine two or more Commitment Drivers to create even more motivation to take action? Demonstrate, I validate, Negotiate
  50. 50. Creating Customer Value 6-1 In a world where access to a Customer's time is increasingly limited, it is critical to get the most from every interaction. High performers know that every interaction is an opportunity to increase sales. Rather than waiting for a longer interaction to gain commitment from a customer, they Close assertively by gaining commitment in both short and long sales interactions. High performers ask themselves: • What commitment can I gain during the next interaction, even if the interaction is brief? • What small commitments can I ask for that will improve my relationship or help differentiate my products? How will I phrase my request? • What items that I have might come into play when I ask for the Customer's commitment? 6-2 Closing Models ■■ 6-4 Skill: Expectations ■■ 6-6 Video Application Clinic II Close Enhanced Skill • Expectations
  51. 51. Creating Customer Value 6-2 Closing Models from Creating Customer Value Selling What does an assertive close sound like? Here are four examples from Creating Customer Value Selling *: TYPE OF CLOSE EXAMPLE Close “customer, will you prescribe [your drug x] instead of [competitor drug y]?” “customer, will you use the [your drug] starter kit for your next patient with the symptoms we discussed?” “customer, will you recommend [your drug] to be added to the community hospital formulary?” “customer, you agreed that [your drug] offers your bi- polar mania patients a benefit vs. [competitor drug y]. For your patients benefit, prescribe [your drug] instead of [competitor drug y].” Ask for prescriptions Ask for trial patients Ask for action Directive close
  52. 52. Creating Customer Value 6-3 COMMON MISTAKES • Waiting until longer, more formal meetings before asking for any commitment to prescribe. • Failing to use each sales call as an opportunity to get commitment on something specific and meaningful that gets the customer using your product. • Closing on a commitment that is too general or too trivial. • Losing the opportunity to ask for commitment during the interaction because you failed to: — create clear Sales Call Objectives, — Position the Sales Call Objective effectively, or — uncover compelling data that might help the customer see your product’s competitive advantages Close
  53. 53. Creating Customer Value 6-4 Skill: Expectations ABOUT THE SKILL • Expectations are clear, assertive statements of what you want, need, or expect from the other party. • Effective use of Expectations can motivate action and Assertive Closing. HOW EXPECTATIONS WORK YOUR GOALS TYPICAL WORDS EXAMPLES Close To be clear To gain respect To act professionally To close assertively “I want” “I need” “I would like” “I want you to come and hear customer Smith talk about _____ this coming Friday.” “I’d need five minutes of your time next week to fully explore this question.” “I’d like you to pick a day when I can do the in-service for your staff.” SUCCESS CRITERIA • Be concise (not wordy) • Be assertive (not timid, but not overbearing) • Be consistent (words, music, dance)
  54. 54. Creating Customer Value 6-5 KEY LESSONS 1. A sales call has significantly less value if it doesn’t result in a “close” or commitment to action by the other party. 2. There are many drug users you can “close” on in short interactions. 3. If you are unable to gain immediate commitment to your Sales Call Objective, you can use one of your Supporting Tactics. 4. If you haven’t Positioned the Sales Call Objective well, you are much less likely to Close assertively. 5. The less powerful we feel in an interaction, the harder it is for us to communicate clear, assertive Expectations. Because of the status and power that doctors have, some sales professionals are hesitant to clearly state their Expectations. 6. Expectations can be communicated too weakly…or too aggressively. Your goal is to be friendly, clear, and direct. 7. Be prepared to state your Expectations more than once. Doctors may not “hear” your first Expectation statement, or not take it seriously. 8. Use silence. After you communicate your Expectation, try being quiet. When you offer lots of reasons after making your Expectation statement you can sound wordy, weak, or whiny. 9. Make sure your “words, music, and dance” are in alignment. The nonverbal “music and dance” that accompany your words send powerful messages. Make sure your tone, posture, and facial expression reflect your intended message. 10. Assertive Closing must be specific to the benefits of the patient/CEO. Close
  55. 55. Creating Customer Value A-1 CREATING CUSTOMER VALUE: FEEDBACK TRACKER – DAY 1 Use this form to record insights, gains, and feedback received during the Creating Customer Value workshop. INSIGHTS FEEDBACK Morning Afternoon
  56. 56. Creating Customer Value A-2 CREATING CUSTOMER VALUE: FEEDBACK TRACKER – DAY 2 Use this form to record insights, gains, and feedback received during the Creating Customer Value workshop. INSIGHTS FEEDBACK Morning Afternoon
  57. 57. SALES CALL OBJECTIVE WORKSHEET customer:________________________________________________ Customer's Background PositionYour Sales Call Objective (What you say to the customer) Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics Contingency Plan/Supporting Tactics More Than Expected Less Than Expected Available Time More Than Expected Sales Call Objective (What you want the customer to do)Customer's Receptivity to My Message
  58. 58. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  59. 59. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  60. 60. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  61. 61. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  62. 62. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  63. 63. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  64. 64. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  65. 65. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  66. 66. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close
  67. 67. SpecificBehaviorialExamplesTiedtoImpact CCVSkillCriteriaStrengthsOpportunities CREATINGCUSTOMERVALUEFEEDBACKFORM Usethisformtorecordandevaluatethebehaviorstheparticipantdemonstratedinthisroleplay. Name:_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ SalesCall Objective Positionthe SalesCall Objective Stage2 Questions Paraphrase andTest Framing Expectations Whatdidtherepresentativedo thatwasespeciallyeffective? Whataretherepresentative’s opportunitiesforimprovement? •Clear,behavioral,obtainable •Reflectscallcontinuum •Marketshareoriented •Morethanoneproduct •Clear,Behavioral,Obtainable •Overlapstheiragenda •Communicatesapatientbenefit •Prioritizing•Emotive •Comparative•Provocative •Hypothetical •Playbackessence •Besincere •Testaccuracy •Benefitsoriented •Frame-in,Frame-out •Usedacommitmentdriver •SalesAidused •Concise•Assertive •Consistentwords,music,dance Plan Approach Interview Demonstrate, Ivalidate, Negotiate Close

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