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Kapow! Participant Exercises for Powerful Research

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You want to truly know the people you’re designing for. But how can you quickly mine a rich history chock-full of routines, worries, motivations, beliefs and needs? You need to embrace participant exercises, whether in an individual interview or as part of a focus group, whether as pre-work or during the research session, whether over WebEx, in a usability lab, or on a participant’s coffee table.

In this workshop you’ll:

Learn how to use participant exercises to get better, deeper responses and insights during research.
Get acquainted with nine exercise types and understand the basics to create and use each.
Immediately apply what you learn to a research project in order to expand your understanding.
Participant exercises empower people to explore, describe and interpret their own behavior and thoughts. These exercises create a vital bridge between design researchers and participants—extending the value of your interviews and observation.

Publicada em: Tecnologia
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Kapow! Participant Exercises for Powerful Research

  1. 1. KAPOW! PARTICIPATORY EXERCISES FOR POWERFUL RESEARCH COLLABORATION UXPA 2016 WORKSHOP ~ LEAH RADER
  2. 2. WHAT IF?
  3. 3. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 3
  4. 4. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 4
  5. 5. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 5
  6. 6. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 6
  7. 7. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 7
  8. 8. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IF YOU COULD… 8
  9. 9. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 9
  10. 10. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 10
  11. 11. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 11
  12. 12. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 12
  13. 13. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 13
  14. 14. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM YOU CAN! 14
  15. 15. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 15 TODAY WE WILL LOOK • Ways to explore experience • How our minds work • How exercises fit in
  16. 16. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 16 LOOK TODAY WE WILL
  17. 17. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 17 LOOK EXPLORE TODAY WE WILL • Types of exercises • What they’re good for • Examples
  18. 18. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 18 LOOK EXPLORE DRAFT REVISE PILOT • Draft exercises • Pilot them • Revise based on feedback TODAY WE WILL
  19. 19. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 19 LOOK EXPLORE DRAFT REVISE PILOT SHARE • Observations 
 and a-ha’s TODAY WE WILL
  20. 20. LET’S BREAK THE ICE
  21. 21. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM INTERVIEW A NEIGHBOR: • Name • Where they are from • a favorite thing to cook OR eat • fantasy vacation (to where? to do what?) LET’S BREAK THE ICE 21 YOU’LL INTRODUCE YOUR NEIGHBOR TO THE ROOM.
  22. 22. THE LAY OF THE LAND
  23. 23. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM LET’S LOOK AT 3 HIGH-LEVEL CHUNKS 23 HOW TO GET DEEPER RESPONSES HOW OUR MINDS WORK WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE
  24. 24. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Interview • Survey WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE 24 SAY MAKEDO • Creative exercises • Expressive exercises • Researcher observation • Participant observation
  25. 25. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Interview • Survey WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE 25 SAY MAKEDO • Creative exercises • Expressive exercises • Researcher observation • Participant observation
  26. 26. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Interview • Survey WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE 26 SAY MAKEDO • Creative exercises • Expressive exercises • Researcher as observer • Participant as observer
  27. 27. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Interview • Survey WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE 27 SAY MAKEDO • Creative exercises • Expressive exercises • Researcher observation • Participant observation
  28. 28. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Interview • Survey WAYS TO EXPLORE EXPERIENCE 28 SAY MAKEDO Participatory exercises • Researcher observation • Participant observation • Creative exercises • Expressive exercises
  29. 29. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM HOW OUR MINDS WORK 29 CAN & WILL IT BE SAID? LAYERS OF RESPONSE ADAPTED FROM COOPER & BRANTHWAITE
  30. 30. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM HOW OUR
 MINDS WORK 30 P U B L I C P R I V A T E E A S Y T O S A Y H A R D T O S A Y A W A R E U N A W A R E SPONTANEOUS RATIONAL PERSONAL, TACIT, LATENT INTUITIVE IMAGINATIVE UNCONSCIOUS REPRESSED CAN & WILL IT BE SAID? LAYERS OF RESPONSE ADAPTED FROM COOPER & BRANTHWAITE
  31. 31. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM LEAVE TO PSYCHOLOGISTS 31 P U B L I C P R I V A T E SPONTANEOUS RATIONAL PERSONAL, TACIT, LATENT INTUITIVE IMAGINATIVE UNCONSCIOUS REPRESSED HOW OUR
 MINDS WORK CAN & WILL IT BE SAID? LAYERS OF RESPONSE E A S Y T O S A Y H A R D T O S A Y A W A R E U N A W A R E ADAPTED FROM COOPER & BRANTHWAITE
  32. 32. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM DIRECT QUESTIONS LEAVE TO PSYCHOLOGISTS 32 P U B L I C P R I V A T E SPONTANEOUS RATIONAL PERSONAL, TACIT, LATENT INTUITIVE IMAGINATIVE UNCONSCIOUS REPRESSED HOW OUR
 MINDS WORK CAN & WILL IT BE SAID? LAYERS OF RESPONSE A W A R E U N A W A R E E A S Y T O S A Y H A R D T O S A Y ADAPTED FROM COOPER & BRANTHWAITE
  33. 33. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM EXERCISES DIRECT QUESTIONS LEAVE TO PSYCHOLOGISTS 33 P U B L I C P R I V A T E SPONTANEOUS RATIONAL PERSONAL, TACIT, LATENT INTUITIVE IMAGINATIVE UNCONSCIOUS REPRESSED HOW OUR
 MINDS WORK CAN & WILL IT BE SAID? LAYERS OF RESPONSE E A S Y T O S A Y H A R D T O S A Y A W A R E U N A W A R E ADAPTED FROM COOPER & BRANTHWAITE
  34. 34. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM HOW TO GET DEEPER RESPONSES 34 • Reported behavior • Opinions and beliefs • Illustrative stories • Expectations and desires DIRECT QUESTIONS
  35. 35. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM HOW TO GET DEEPER RESPONSES 35 • Help participants remember, select, talk about and interpret past events • Help participants become aware of and describe behavior, thoughts and feelings (these are also called enabling exercises) EXPRESSIVE EXERCISES
  36. 36. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM HOW TO GET DEEPER RESPONSES 36 • Help participants talk about sensitive topics • Help participants express abstract feelings and thoughts (these are also called projective exercises) CREATIVE EXERCISES
  37. 37. LET’S MAKE SOME EXERCISES
  38. 38. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM LET’S TAKE IT STEP BY STEP 38 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE COLLECT ANALYZE PLANNING: SHARE REFLECTDOING:
  39. 39. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM COLLECT 39 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE YOU’VE BEEN HIRED! REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  40. 40. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 40 TO UNCOVER POSSIBLE NEW PRODUCTS OR SERVICES MEANINGFUL TO PET OWNERS YOU’VE BEEN HIRED! COLLECTSCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  41. 41. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 41 SCENARIO EXPAND PET OWNERSHIP IS ALL ABOUT… COLLECTNARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  42. 42. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 42 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW WORKSHEET WITH A PARTNER (15 MIN) COLLECTDRAFT PILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  43. 43. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 43 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT FIRST ALL THE EXERCISE TYPES AND THEN WE DRAFT COLLECTPILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  44. 44. TYPES OF EXERCISES
  45. 45. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM TYPES OF EXERCISES 45 LIST MAD LIB STORY TRACK SORT PLAYMAPDIAGRAMMAKE ?
  46. 46. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Collecting elements of a category (e.g. “types of meals I cook”) • Gathering feelings and needs around a topic • Compiling inventories (e.g. “What’s in my bathroom cabinet”) • Capturing schedules • Lists can be lower effort for participants to complete but yield rich discussion. Good as an opening exercise. LIST 46
  47. 47. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM LIST 47 List combined with Diagram to show priority of elements—inner circle is higher priority
  48. 48. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM LIST 48 from Afshan Amjad’s research with students about their school experiences before & after immigration. http://www.academia.edu/1473148/ Interviewing_Participants_About_Past_Events_The_He lpful_Role_of_Pre-Interview_Activities
  49. 49. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Eliciting associations, desires, preferences, values • Gathering participant’s own words around a prompt to help with evaluating the symbolic meanings associated with the topic • Can be used to assess motivations and attitudes • Good bang for the buck— these are easier to create and offer high value results! MAD LIB 49 (AKA Sentence Completion)
  50. 50. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAD LIB 50 (AKA Sentence Completion) from Sentence Completion for Evaluating Symbolic Meaning by Kujala and Nurkka, 2012 http://www.ijdesign.org/ojs/index.php/ IJDesign/article/view/1166/523 Nice projective question! —>
  51. 51. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAD LIB 51 (AKA Sentence Completion) First time home buying experience: left side provides “get to know you” material expectations vs reality analogies
  52. 52. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAD LIB 52 Mad Lib combined with sketch to understand the role of cash relative to digital payments (AKA Sentence Completion)
  53. 53. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Learning about negative/positive events • Exploring a category—understanding perspectives and values around a topic • Gathering lessons learned • These are best as solo-work to enable enough time for reflection. FORMATS TO CONSIDER: • Letters to myself (past self/future self) • Mini-stories: “tell about a time when…” • Photo story STORY 53
  54. 54. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM STORY 54 Snags & Delights are mini-stories about negative and positive experiences.
  55. 55. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM STORY 55 Letter to My Younger Self helps to understand the impact of past choices on a participant’s current state
  56. 56. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Recording behavior, routines, feelings over time • Gathering photos from participant POV—empowers your participants! • Enabling awareness of automatic behavior around a topic • Good platform for comparing moments (e.g. does this log reflect what is normal?) FORMAT VARIABLES TO CONSIDER: • Diaries & calendars • Analog or digital • Any time period, brief or lengthy! TRACK 56
  57. 57. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM TRACK 57 30 day Mood Calendar to track emotions, key moments, and provide a platform for follow-up discussion. Researcher’s post-it notes from —> follow-up conversation
  58. 58. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM TRACK 58 dscout snippet for week long diary using a smart phone to log moments
  59. 59. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM TRACK 59 Visual story book of one dinner - this project happened before smart phones. I like that it breaks down a 1 - 2 hour event into multiple stages to gather great process details. Participants took 10 - 15 photos over the course of the one special dinner.
  60. 60. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Identifying and exploring categories • Understanding relationships among elements - leads to uncovering mental models • Learning about preferences and priorities (when participants rank order elements) • Remembering stories (when participants select or sort images) • Always collaborative to create a deck of triggers/images — it helps eliminate gaps in your individual thinking SORT 60
  61. 61. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SORT 61 An elegant content sort from userresearch.blog.gov.uk 
  62. 62. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SORT 62 Photo deck to choose images that best fit certain criteria. (This was an exercise to help participants practice developing a design vocabulary so they could react to unbranded website designs on the basis of imagery, color, and font only.)
  63. 63. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SORT 63 Scenario-based sort with multiple decks: big cards with scenario elements and small cards with social media elements
  64. 64. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SORT 64 Dixit cards to help with storytelling
  65. 65. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Using metaphors & analogies to express hard-to-articulate ideas • Capturing moods & feelings • Generating future scenarios • Participants need lots of time to create and explain - do not rush! FORMATS TO CONSIDER: • Drawings • Collage • Sculpture, models • Building (e.g. with Legos or cut-outs/pieces made by you) MAKE 65
  66. 66. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAKE 66 Drawing to express how it feels to have family in different countries.
  67. 67. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAKE 67 Mood board collage to explore current state & future state.
  68. 68. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAKE 68 Sculpture about possible new ways to use technology in a hotel
  69. 69. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAKE 69 Cut-outs of design elements for participants to use to build paper prototypes, prioritize features, add new features, etc.
  70. 70. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM DIAGRAM 70 WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Understanding timelines and steps in a process • Looking at relationships (e.g. people, objects, activities) • Exploring conceptual categories • Use simple Venns, 2x2s and linear scales as frameworks • Unless you know the user’s native terms, resist using internal labels on process steps—be vague (e.g. “how it begins”)
  71. 71. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM DIAGRAM 71 How a teacher feels over the course of an assignment This is an example of a time when we did know the user’s vocabulary and put specific labels on the journey.
  72. 72. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM DIAGRAM 72 Venn diagram to categorize which channel should be used for each need (Sort hybrid)
  73. 73. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM DIAGRAM 73 How time is spent vs how time would like to be spent
  74. 74. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Understanding relationships among elements in a category • Comparing activities to locations Maps provide a good platform for creating multiple layers of meaning. Create ways to code and annotate the base layer in order to explore: • likes/dislikes/feelings • channel use • purpose/role of mapped items • priority of mapped items MAP 74
  75. 75. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAP 75 Social media tools this participant uses, the importance of each, how each is engaged with, the purpose of each and how she controls interactions among them.
  76. 76. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAP 76 Maps are a form of diagrams but deserve to be recognized as a unique form…this one is nice because it is flexible to accommodate each participant’s story and has many layers of information (see left column). Follow the participant’s lead on the narrative. Go back to add layer details in one fell swoop (e.g. timing, emotions, roles—use post-its if your map base gets too crowded)
  77. 77. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM MAP 77 Map of accounts and color- coded channel pathways for how money enters the system and moves within the system.
  78. 78. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM WHAT IT’S GOOD FOR: • Exploring important scenarios - and noticing emotions/assumptions in scenarios • Lessening pressure around sensitive topics • Gathering values, norms, rules, and native language • Exploring solution spaces FORMATS TO CONSIDER: • Role playing • Games PLAY 78
  79. 79. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PLAY 79 Role-play moderating for a difficult topic from userresearch.blog.gov.uk instead of the participant having to take on a “depressing role”, the researcher played that part and the participant played the role of family member or friend to coach the researcher in what to do to meet his needs on the website.
  80. 80. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PLAY 80 Game for community building from Thesis Chronicle, https://thesischronicle.wordpress.com/2011/07/14/ change-by-design-kenya/
  81. 81. BREAK START AGAIN AT 11:00
  82. 82. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 82 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT LET’S DRAFT TOGETHER COLLECTPILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  83. 83. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PLANNING 83
  84. 84. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PLANNING 84
  85. 85. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 85 NOW YOU DRAFT! (33 MIN) • Sketch - use a whole page per exercise • Try multiple versions or approaches • Avoid perfectionism SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT COLLECTPILOT REVISE REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  86. 86. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 86 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE TIME TO PILOT! 10 (X2) MIN FOR EACH TEAM 10 MIN TO GIVE FEEDBACK 30 MIN TOTAL COLLECT REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  87. 87. LUNCH START AGAIN AT 1:30
  88. 88. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 88 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE REVISE (30 MIN) • Fix confusing instructions • Look for opportunities to add layers for more depth • Create new exercises if you didn’t like the result you got COLLECT REFLECTANALYZE SHARE
  89. 89. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 89 SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT COLLECT REFLECTANALYZE SHAREREVISE MORE RESEARCH 15 MIN FOR EACH TEAM 30 MIN TOTAL
  90. 90. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 90 AN INTERLUDE ABOUT ANALYSIS AND OTHER THINGS NOT YET COVERED… SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REFLECTSHAREREVISE ANALYZECOLLECT
  91. 91. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM EXERCISES GET FIVE MAIN DATA TYPES: • Catalog-able things: inventories, types, resources, tools, needs, etc. It can be helpful for your stakeholders to learn by seeing a “set” of information (tell meal types story here.) • Behavior and process: your participants’ routines, the order of steps, variations, relationships among the parts of processes. This is the stuff of journey maps. • Feelings and desires. This helps you develop empathy in yourself and stakeholders. • Mental model ingredients: needs, motivations, attitudes, preferences, roles • High octane illustrative quotes and stories so you can tell a riveting tale. WHAT DATA TO EXPECT 91
  92. 92. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PATTERN IDENTIFICATION IS FUN & E-Z WITH ARTIFACTS! • Try starting with a framework (AEIOU, POEMS, etc) to look for commonalities and differences among the artifacts. Sorting into groups is half the battle. (Effectively, truly naming what is going on in the groups is the other half of the battle.) • Language/text analysis plays a big part—tag repeating words and language motifs. • Make a consolidated master. • It’s ok to keep emotional data simple - it can often speak for itself with just a little category framing from you. • Weirdly, sometimes you don’t do analysis on the exercise artifact itself if it was used in an organizational way, meaning it helped you track and structure a complex conversation. So, if the resulting artifacts are wildly divergent and not catalog-able, then don’t stress. WORKING WITH EXERCISE DATA 92
  93. 93. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM CATALOG (AKA MAKE A “MASTER”) 93
  94. 94. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM CREATE GROUPS 94
  95. 95. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM GET IMMERSIVE: • Consider a science fair (analog or digital) • Ask for engagement (e.g. “who are you like, who are you unlike?) • Show artifacts in your deliverables SHARING WITH STAKEHOLDERS 95
  96. 96. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SCIENCE FAIR 96
  97. 97. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM SCIENCE FAIR 97
  98. 98. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM FULLY DIGITAL OR PARTIALLY ANALOG • google slides and google docs are your friends • consider an overhead projector WHAT ABOUT REMOTE EXERCISES? 98
  99. 99. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM PARTIALLY ANALOG 99
  100. 100. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM GOOGLE SLIDES 100 GO TO GOOGLE NOW…
  101. 101. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM • Instructions are critical when participants are handling exercises on their own. Triple check how the instructions are interpreted before you send to real participants. • Keep instructions short. Don’t layer on a lot of steps in pre-work. Save exploring additional layers for the debrief conversation. In-person exercises can more easily have many layers because the moderator is there to manage the complexity. • Plan your follow up questions carefully—the exercise isn’t fully prepared until you know what to probe on, listen for, and layer on during follow up conversation. • Try sending pre-work as simple email prompts or in a google form—exercises do not have to be visually designed to be effective! Lists, mad-libs & stories require fewer visuals. • In-person maps and diagrams can start with a blank page, as long as you have your checklist of elements to layer on and you have practiced how to guide the build-up of info. CONSIDERATIONS FOR PRE-WORK VS. IN-PERSON 101
  102. 102. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 102 ANALYZE (20 MIN) WHAT’S YOUR RECOMMENDATION FOR THE DECISION THAT CLIENT NEEDS TO MAKE? SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REFLECTSHAREREVISE ANALYZECOLLECT
  103. 103. BREAK WE’LL START AGAIN AT 4:00
  104. 104. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 104 SHARE OUT: • THE DECISION YOU’RE HELPING THE CLIENT MAKE • 1 0R 2 NEAT-O THINGS YOU FOUND • YOUR RECOMMENDATION SINCE YOU ARE “SATISFICING" TODAY, JUST DO WHAT YOU CAN WITH THE DATA AND TIME THAT YOU’VE GOT! IT WILL BE JUST RIGHT. :-) SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REFLECTREVISE COLLECT SHAREANALYZE
  105. 105. SAN FRANCISCO | SPRINGSTUDIO.COM 105 WHAT DID YOU NOTICE? SCENARIO EXPAND NARROW DRAFT PILOT REVISE COLLECT ANALYZE REFLECTSHARE
  106. 106. 106 THANK YOU, THIS WAS FUN!

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