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Chapter 4 power point

  1. 1. © Cengage Learning 2016© Cengage Learning 2016 An Invitation to Health: Building Your Future, Brief Edition, 9e Dianne Hales Your Social Health 4
  2. 2. © Cengage Learning 2016 After reading this chapter, the student should be able to: • Explain the meaning of the term social health, using examples • Outline various ways of communicating, including gender specific ones • Examine how relationships contribute to the social health of individuals Objectives
  3. 3. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Evaluate the impact of modern technology on communicating • Identify current trends in dating among young people • Explain the significance of love to an individual’s well-being • Summarize the impact of dysfunctional relationships Objectives (cont’d.)
  4. 4. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Describe the trends, factors, and forms of long-term partnering in America • Summarize the changes that have taken place in the American household over time Objectives (cont’d.)
  5. 5. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Social health includes the ability to: – Interact effectively with people and with the social environment – Develop satisfying personal relationships – Fulfill social roles • Social support affects physical health – People of all ages function best in socially supportive environment The Social Dimension of Health
  6. 6. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Learn to listen – Relationships always involve an emotional investment – Opening yourself up to others increases your own self-knowledge and understanding • Be agreeable but assertive – Communicate your wishes calmly and clearly Communicating
  7. 7. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Communication traits of young boys – Make less eye contact – Vocabulary includes fewer “feeling” words – Faces become less emotional as they grow • Communication traits of adult men – Use fewer words than women – Interrupt more – Make more eye contact when speaking to women than to men Communication Differences Between Men and Women
  8. 8. © Cengage Learning 2016 • As much as 90 percent of communication is nonverbal • Body language – Includes tone of voice, body position • Culture differences affect interpretation of body language – Example: eye contact interpreted as hostile or challenging in one culture • Conveying friendliness in another culture Nonverbal Communication
  9. 9. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Friendship – Basic source of happiness – Source of solace in times of trouble • Emotional closeness declines 15 percent per year in the absence of face-to-face contact • Loneliness – Adolescents, the elderly, adults who live alone, and single parents most affected Forming Relationships
  10. 10. © Cengage Learning 2016 • 10 to 15 percent of children born with predisposition to shyness – Others become shy due to rejection, shame, or lack of learning proper social responses • Types of shyness – Fearfully shy – Self-consciously shy • Social anxiety disorder – Affects about seven percent of the population Shyness and Social Anxiety Disorder
  11. 11. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Altruism – Helping or giving to others – Enhances self-esteem • Volunteerism – Helps those who give as well as those who receive – May lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease Building a Healthy Community
  12. 12. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Almost one-third of the world’s population uses the Internet – 77 percent of Americans • Social networking a growing trend – Individuals who socialize online show same psychological sense of community as those who interact in person • Facebook provides greater social support than Twitter Living in a Wired World
  13. 13. © Cengage Learning 2016 • 94 percent of college students maintain a social networking profile • Motivations – Nurturing or maintaining existing relationships – Seeking new relationships – Enhancing reputation – Avoiding loneliness – Keeping tabs on others – Self-esteem Social Networking on Campus
  14. 14. © Cengage Learning 2016 • What was once shared with one other person is now often shared publicly • Negative aspects of social networking – Sexting • Can have unintended consequences – Excessive cell phone and Internet use – Cyberbullying – Cyberstalking Self-Disclosure and Privacy
  15. 15. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Many young people socialize in groups before venturing into a romantic relationship • Hooking up – Casual sexual encounter – No expectation of emotional intimacy or relationship – Those who participate more likely white, attractive, outgoing, and nonreligious Dating on Campus
  16. 16. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Love is a basic need – Essential to physical and psychological well- being • Intimacy – Open, trusting, sharing of confidential thoughts and feelings – Requires time and nurturing – Does not require sex Loving and Being Loved
  17. 17. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Top reasons for attraction – Warmth and kindness – Desirable personality – Something specific about the person – Reciprocal liking • Infatuation – Being head-over-heels in love – Feelings are temporary What Attracts Two People to Each Other?
  18. 18. © Cengage Learning 2016
  19. 19. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Types of committed relationships – Heterosexual marriages – Heterosexuals who never marry – Homosexuals who partner or marry • Emerging adulthood – Occurs in the late teens and early twenties – Time marked by volatility and identity formation – Brain still developing until age 25 Partnering Across the Lifespan
  20. 20. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Previous generation: 70 percent of Americans married – Number is 50 percent today – Men more likely to be single than women • Every age bracket • Married people are healthier and live longer than non-married people – A happy marriage boosts mental well-being in both spouses Marriage
  21. 21. © Cengage Learning 2016 • Families are very diverse – Gender role reversal more common in African American families – Chinese American families often have two working parents • Wife may not have equal role in decision-making – Blended families occur in three of 10 households • Children of previous relationships Family Ties

Notas do Editor

  • Figure 4.1 Sternberg’s love triangle

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