O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.
Responsible Journalism 
Abygail Jones
Social and Cultural Awareness 
When writing about groups of people readers won’t 
particularly have experience with, a jou...
NUJ Guidelines 
The NUJ guidelines are there for journalists to refer to, especially when reporting on serious issues such...
NUJ Code of Conduct 
The National Union of Journalists enforces a code of conduct that consists of 12 guidelines a 
journa...
Connotation 
Connotation is an associated or secondary explanation of either a word or expression in 
comparison to it’s p...
Alternative Readings 
Although writing is generally aimed at a specific audience, it’s a good idea to 
take in to consider...
Credibility 
Credibility is how reliable or trustworthy something is, in 
this case it’s news stories and reports. 
If a s...
Objective 
In order to create a successful story, journalists must make sure they are equally distributing the 
facts, unp...
Accurate 
It’s very important to ensure that all names, dates, times, quotes and other factual information included within...
Truthful 
It’s important to be truthful when it comes to articles – it’s heavily dependant on facts and 
truth and has the...
Fair and Balanced 
When writing an article or news story, it’s imperative that the whole thing is open 
minded and non-dis...
Próximos SlideShares
Carregando em…5
×

Responsible Journalism

380 visualizações

Publicada em

Tis what it says on the tin

Publicada em: Educação
  • Seja o primeiro a comentar

  • Seja a primeira pessoa a gostar disto

Responsible Journalism

  1. 1. Responsible Journalism Abygail Jones
  2. 2. Social and Cultural Awareness When writing about groups of people readers won’t particularly have experience with, a journalist must take in to consideration the different ethnic/social backgrounds, the way that they explain the group influences how the reader feels about them – bias representations of these groups will have a bad impact on them, what would make it a good piece of factual writing would be a balanced piece. The NUJ (National Union of Journalists) has created a range of ethical guidance sheets for it’s members to use, this makes sure they adhere to certain guidelines to make sure their writing will not effect anyone in any way.
  3. 3. NUJ Guidelines The NUJ guidelines are there for journalists to refer to, especially when reporting on serious issues such as: race or religion. Journalists don’t have to follow them, but they are there as a general guideline when dealing with things that could offend or seriously effect people – they are also there to keep away court cases, here are some examples: When reporting on race: Only mention someone’s race if it is strictly relevant. Check to make sure you have it right. Would you mention race if the person was white? http://ethicaljournalisminitiative.org/en/contents/nuj-guidelines-on-race-reporting When reporting on immigration and asylum: Don’t use terms such as, ‘bogus’, ‘illegal’ or ‘failed’ asylum seeker. If necessary, use ‘refused’ asylum seeker instead. A fairer term to use for someone who has outstayed their visa is ‘undocumented’ or ‘irregular’. https://www.nuj.org.uk/news/updated-nuj-race-reporting-guidelines-and-efj-manifesto/ When reporting on age: Provide balance when reporting intergenerational conflict: include views from older people who support the young, as well as those who complain about them. https://www.nuj.org.uk/news/guidelines-on-bullying-harassment- and-discrimination-for-reps/ When reporting on suicide: Avoid disclosing method of suicide whenever possible, for example never print details of drugs used or their dosages. http://suicideprevention.ca/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Scotland_Reporting-Mental-Health_- National-Union-for-Journalists.pdf They also cover areas on disability, mental illness and sexually transmitted diseases. They also have a hotline journalists can contact when enquiring about a particular story or problem.
  4. 4. NUJ Code of Conduct The National Union of Journalists enforces a code of conduct that consists of 12 guidelines a journalist must adhere to and agree with when they sign up for the NUJ, these rules are clear instructions that also aid a journalist in their writing, some of these rules are: - Does her/his utmost to correct harmful inaccuracies. - Differentiates between fact and opinion. - Does nothing to intrude into anybody's private life, grief or distress unless justified by overriding consideration of the public interest. - Protects the identity of sourced who supply information in confidence and material gathered in the course of her/his work. - Produces no material likely to lead to hatred or discrimination, on the ground of a persons age, gender, race, colour, creed, legal status, disability, marital status or sexual orientation. - Avoids plagiarism. https://www.nuj.org.uk/about/nuj-code/ Conscience Clause The idea behind the conscience clause was to enforce a rule that allows journalists to refuse n assignment that would ‘contravene their ethical code’ they feel that, ‘no journalists should be disciplined or suffer detriment to their careers for asserting their right to act ethically.’ The conscience clause would protect them against being disciplined or facing any implications with their career for refusing an assignment they see as unethical. https://www.nuj.org.uk/news/conscience-clause-remains-essential-for-journalists/
  5. 5. Connotation Connotation is an associated or secondary explanation of either a word or expression in comparison to it’s primary meaning. For example, if you were to call someone a dog, it wouldn’t mean you’re literally calling them a dog, it’s alternative meaning is generally ‘ugly.’ When talking about disability, the NUJ would rather a journalist refers to say, someone in a wheelchair as a wheelchair user rather than ‘wheelchair bound’ or make any kind of reference to them being ‘confined’. Or when writing about deaf people, don’t call them, ‘the deaf’ refer to them as, ‘hard of hearing’ or ‘deaf.’ When talking about age, be careful that you refer to them as, say ‘elderly’ rather than ‘pensioner’, ‘OAP’ or ‘grandma/grandpa’ as it can cause offence or marginalise people. If the objective was to write a story on the elderly, you wouldn’t call them ‘grandma’ or, ‘grandpa’ as it’s quite a personal statement – only call them that when absolutely necessary, for example: been given permission to use those terms. The same goes for younger people, you wouldn’t categorize them as thugs or bums as that’s disrespectful to the age group, refer to them as: ‘youngsters’ or ‘youths.’
  6. 6. Alternative Readings Although writing is generally aimed at a specific audience, it’s a good idea to take in to consideration the fact that people from other groups could end up reading it. Because of this, it’s essential to make sure that all points are equally balanced and take other ages and subcultures in to account, for example: A report on age and the differences between old and young should be fairly balanced and have an argument and an explanation for both – it should be fairly balanced and there should be no inclination of bias reasoning’s or examples, everything should be fairly assessed and evaluated. If it’s not fair, with arguments for both and bias on the writers account, it could cause problems for the writer and the audience reading it, as they could become offended and angry – sparking arguments within the media, especially between these two groups. It’s imperative that all of the facts, data and information is correct and well thought out for different groups – otherwise problems can arise.
  7. 7. Credibility Credibility is how reliable or trustworthy something is, in this case it’s news stories and reports. If a story is not seen as credible or believable then it loses it’s value – this could be very bad for both the journalist and the newspaper they are working for. In order to be credible, a journalist must focus on: • Objective • Accuracy • Truthfulness • How fair and balanced a story is
  8. 8. Objective In order to create a successful story, journalists must make sure they are equally distributing the facts, unprejudiced and unbiased, this is to ensure the story won’t offend anyone or go against the objective, which in turn will make sure the article and the newspaper wont get in trouble. If a journalist has an agenda they will look for evidence that will support their ideas and they will discard any evidence that doesn’t work – because of this they will produce work that doesn’t have an independent look on an event and will instead be heavily reliant on the journalists idea. Most newspapers have a political agenda, this will lean either towards the ‘left wing’ with positive views on equality and supporting those who can’t support themselves, standing for ideas such as: national health service (NHS) and job seekers allowance. Whereas the ‘right wing’ has negative views on equality and has views such as: survival of the fittest, economic freedom and also that we should all be able to look after ourselves, enforcing ideas such as freedom to succeed over equality – the polar opposite to the ‘left wing’s views. In April of 2013, the BBC was accused of being more ‘leftie bias’ when they covered the death of Thatcher – it’s main news website was supposedly filled with negative articles aimed at her, such news stories as: ‘What if Margaret Thatcher had never been?’ and ‘The TV was turned off when she came on.’ There was a lot of news coverage over the cost of Thatcher’s funeral which caused quite an uproar from left wing newspapers – they focused on how Thatcher was supposedly racist with ‘no corresponding article about her many fans.’ http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2307211/Margaret-Thatcher-dead-Readers-fury-biased- BBC-website-articles.html
  9. 9. Accurate It’s very important to ensure that all names, dates, times, quotes and other factual information included within a story to support the writing is one hundred percent correct, making sure the story itself is accurate to report and publish. Failure to do so can harm and cause distress to people or groups of people – cases of libel can be brought up if there is false allegations against a particular person or a group, for example: In the Ballard News-Tribune article, entitled: How does Ballard stack up in residential burglaries?’ the Ballard Smoke Shop was wrongly accused of having rowdiness and bar fights within it’s walls; the incident - a visiting tourist got a glass smashed against his face – actually happened just down the road and a reader assured the writers that the Smoke Shop doesn’t allow rowdiness and they don’t over serve their customers – always keeping a watchful eye to make sure incidents like that don’t happen. http://www.poynter.org/news/mediawire/233613/the-best-and-worst-media-errors-and-corrections-in-2013/ The Press Complains Commission (PCC) look in to stories and complaints like these and assess them – the editors code of conduct on accuracy states: i) The Press must take care not to publish inaccurate, misleading or distorted information, including pictures. ii) A significant inaccuracy, misleading statement or distortion once recognised must be corrected, promptly and with due prominence, and - where appropriate - an apology published. In cases involving the Commission, prominence should be agreed with the PCC in advance. iii) The Press, whilst free to be partisan, must distinguish clearly between comment, conjecture and fact. iv) A publication must report fairly and accurately the outcome of an action for defamation to which it has been a party, unless an agreed settlement states otherwise, or an agreed statement is published. http://www.pcc.org.uk/cop/practice.html
  10. 10. Truthful It’s important to be truthful when it comes to articles – it’s heavily dependant on facts and truth and has the power to sway a persons opinion on a particular group or subject. If a journalist was to write fiction; their work can have some serious legal and ethical consequences – however these rules are constantly broken, newspapers try to grab the attention from readers using fake news stories that sound appealing or interesting – they can also do it so that they are following their particular political agenda. For example: in 2009, the Daily Record released a story that a man in India was going to sue Axe Body Spray after he ‘failed to attract swimsuit models who would carry pitchers of beer to his apartment.’ What really happened was a reporter, Tommy Christopher went to the Axe company – found a spokesperson and found out that they managed to trace the story back to a ‘parody news site.’ http://www.fakingnews.firstpost.com/2009/10/unable-to-attract-even-a-single-girl-frustrated- man-sues-axe/ http://www.cracked.com/article_20293_5-clearly-fake-news-stories-media-told-you-were-true_ p2.html
  11. 11. Fair and Balanced When writing an article or news story, it’s imperative that the whole thing is open minded and non-discriminatory! There should be two sides to the story – it should be unbiased as readers usually makes decisions based on facts. This is often overlooked or ignored as a rule because using emotive language or an emotive subject usually gets more sales. The NUJ rule strictly states: ‘Produces no material likely to lead to hatred or discriminations on the grounds of a person’s age, gender, race, colour, creed, legal status, disability, marital status, or sexual orientation.’ https://www.nuj.org.uk/about/nuj-code/ For example: imagine the objective is to write a story between two groups, for example, the Ferguson news story that is currently circulating through the media. You wouldn’t just focus on one side of the story, you’d write a fair and balanced report on the happenings currently going down in that area of the world – no bias opinions and no taking sides, equal arguments from both sides – that’s what makes a good, true story.

×