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JUNE -25 CIS
A BREWSTER MAGAZINE
"^t^t^c u^cmM^^/t
SHOULD YOU AVARRY YOUR OPPOSITE 1
Famous Stars D/scuss this Question - ...
<SK (Mother's Tkfy
is to help her child keep that schoolgirl complexion
Authorities say every mother should follow this
si...
Advertising Section OEMOTJON PICTURI
inell I MAGAZINE
Is there a new fashion in Rouge?
Emphatically, yes! —bright colors i...
^MOTION PICTURP
nEJI I MAGAZINE L Advertising Section
9f
A Party Everyone Can Enjoy
If you had a great big group of friend...
The Bulletin-Board
On which is posted last-minute news about pictures and players
I 1
a
FOUR years is long enough to go wi...
A Guide to 150 Current Pictures
Which are now being shown thruout the United States
I
Alaskan, The—Xot up
to the caliber o...
«EMTO3SP"1
satisfactory speed. Marc MacDermott shines.
(First National)
In Hollywood with Potash & Perlmutter
Reveals clev...
Clippings from the Motion Picture Magazine
of June, 1915
Which will freshen the memory of our old readers and enlighten ou...
Advertising Section OTION PICTU
MAGAZINE
T
No C. O. D. Nothing to Pay for AHaaoninuan on Arrival
Not a penny now. Just mai...
«S!^R
E Advertising Section
See the Photoplays that
"Must be Fine"
COME authors' names
^ have magic in them
—you know that...
Advertising Section lne>l I MAGAZINE t
"The Necessary Evil"
TN every picture in which that young actor,
-*-
Ben Lyon, appe...
A scene from "The Covered Wagon," which was given second place by the critics in their list of the five best pictures of a...
The Sea Hawk 31
The White Sister 30
Humoresque 30
He Who Gets Slapped 30
America 30
The Lost World 30
Secrets 30
When Knig...
f
"MOTION PICTUFf
V I MAGAZINE 1-
Advertising Section
WILLIAM FOX PRESENTS IN SEPTEMBER! 9^5
Gjtsxejreats for (picture "Pa...
Cover Design Gloria Swanson as Madame Sans-Gene, a painting by M. Paddock from the photograph by
Manuel Freres Cover
The B...
«frK!^R
E Advertising Section
Mellin's Food
!
16
AG£.
Use the Mellin's Food Method of Milk
Modification for your baby. It ...
WR30'2S
©C1B656904 ts
Vol. XXIX
Motion Picture Magazine
Founded by J. Stuart Blackton in 1910—Trademark Registered
JUNE, 1...
f
"MOTION PICTURF
01 I MAGAZINE L Advertlsing Section
To FREE YOUR SKIN FROM BLEMISHES
—
USe the
famous Woodbury treatment...
^^^^fc- ^"
OUQ PORTMTGPiLlIR)'
Lew Cody
Lew is one of the screen's best bad men. In fact, a good many of us have
caught ou...
May McAvoy
So far as May is concerned, we
vote 50-50 on this blonde-and-
brunette question. She's just
as enchantingly lov...
William Putter
Neil Hamilton
He is another Griffith discovery,
and consequently is well worth
watching. His work in "Isn't...
Henry Waxman
Georgia Hale
She won her right to stardom by her work
in "The Salvation Hunters." As soon as
that picture was...
Gertrude Olmstead
She's playing opposite Rudolph Valentino
in "Cobra." Its a vamping role, and she
wears a blonde wig—but ...
Charles
Delaney
It's hard to believe that the smiling
boy in the picture above could be one
of the inmates in "The Mansion...
June Marlowe
Rin Tin Tin is a sure enough lucky dog to be starred with such
an attractive girl as June. Their latest pictu...
I
Mr. and Mrs. James Cruze (Betty Compson)
Betty Compson Answers:
YES—and no !
I think married people should be alike in
t...
Your Opposite?
successful married life
ladies of some of the
motion picture world
Keeping the other half of the partnershi...
(T«!SR
E
At the left you'll find
Ruth Clifford Cor-
nelius and her hus-
band. Ruth says she
doesn't know whether
she marri...
Henry Waxraan
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dempsey
Naturally, the last word on the subject of marrying opposites should be given to E...
"S-s-s-sh! People Say
99
Every time
Eric von
Stroheim be-
gins to di-
rect a picture,
the rumor
spreads that
he is going
t...
Motion Picture - Magazine, June 1925
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Motion Picture - Magazine, June 1925

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Motion Picture - Magazine, June 1925. News, gossip, latest updated information on all the movies of the period. An early and historical view of Hollywood. Gloucester, Virginia Links and News, GVLN, website. Visit us for super content.

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Motion Picture - Magazine, June 1925

  1. 1. JUNE -25 CIS A BREWSTER MAGAZINE "^t^t^c u^cmM^^/t SHOULD YOU AVARRY YOUR OPPOSITE 1 Famous Stars D/scuss this Question - on P&oes 28-3/
  2. 2. <SK (Mother's Tkfy is to help her child keep that schoolgirl complexion Authorities say every mother should follow this simple rule in skin care with a growing child jn.... , OLIVE TREE SHE'S indoors one moment, outdoors the next. She's exposed to all the extremes of temper- atute known. Are you giving her skin the correct care? Beauty scientists now tell us that skin radiance in girl- hood is largely dependent upon the precautions taken in childhood. Help her keep the exquisitely supple skin she has today. Rememberthat she can, all through life, if only a few simple rules of caution and care be followed now. Never let a day pass without this The secret, as experts all can tell, is in the balmy lather of palm and olive oils—the perfect blend- ing as found in Palmolive. As she grows older, let her use powder if she wishes. But never leave it on over night. It clogs the pores, often enlarges them. Blackheads and disfig- urements often follow. The skin must be kept clean, the pores open and active. Just before retiring, wash gently with soothing Palmolive. Then massage it softly into the skin. Rinse thoroughly. Then apply a touch of cold cream if the skin is dry and needs it. The 'world's most simple beauty treatment Thus in a simple manner, millions since the days of Cleopatra have found beauty, charm and youth prolonged. No medicaments are necessary. Remove the day's accumulations of dirt and oil, cleanse the pores, and nature will be kind. The skin will be of fine texture. Coloring will be good. Avoid this mistake Do not use ordinary soap in the treatment given above. Do not think any green soap, or one repre- sented as of palm and olive oils, is as good. Palm- olive is a skin emollient in soap form. The secret is in the oils and their blending. And it costs but 10c the cake! Obtain a cake today. Then note what an amazing difference one week makes. THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY (Del. Corp.). CHICAGO. ILL. Soap from Trees The only oils in Palmolive Soap art the priceless beauty oils from these three trees —and no other fats whatsoever. That is why Palmolive Soap is the natural color that it is- for palm and olive oils. nothing the, give Palmolive its green color Palmolive Soap is untouched by human hands until you break the wrapper — /'/ is never sold unwrapped.
  3. 3. Advertising Section OEMOTJON PICTURI inell I MAGAZINE Is there a new fashion in Rouge? Emphatically, yes! —bright colors in costumes and settings are influenc- ing the modern woman toward a more daring and colorful complexion. y^NEW fashion in rouge? /% fl — It is here ! Appearing ^-^"*' first in Vienna but a few months since, this new mode of high complexion color has traversed that swift, mysterious route that links smart women everywhere, from Deauville to the Riviera, to Paris, to New York and Hollywood. You have doubtless already ob- served, how the modern trend of fashion in brilliant contrasts of pure color, in both costumes and decorations, is exerting its positive influence on the cheeks and lips of the modern woman. And why not? Surely amid the col- orful splendor of blazing fabrics and flaring lights, the soft rose tones of the complexion's natural flush fade into a totally unnatural pallor. So that the high color produced by the modern rouge merely restores the vivacity of nature. VIVID—The New Shade in Rouge For many months now, Princess Pat, Ltd. , always alert to the lat- est modes and developments of beauty's toilette, has been apace with this newest trend, in what is called the modern flare for color. Now, thanks to the countless ex- periments and tests conducted by the Princess Pat Chemists, a new and marvelous shade, known as Princess Pat VIVID, has been pro- duced, which is simply a deep and brilliant intensification of nature's own rose tone—so daring that you will gleam with emphatic beauty amid the most colorful surround- ings ; yet so true to nature that when sparingly applied and softly - "Fashionable Europeans ere all wearing it." blended with powder, even though you are a most conservative user of rouge, you need not hesitate to wear it. Princess Pat VIVID is the chosen shade of the ultra-fashion- able in these ultra-colorful days. English Tint, the Famous "Orange Rouge" that Changes Tone to Harmonize with Any Skin Yet the vogue for Vivid Rouge has not by any means lessened the popularity of that other triumph, Princess Pat English Tint, whose bright orange, in the compact, changes so miraculously to rose on the cheeks and blends so delicately with nature's skin tones on blonde or brunette, whether in day or even- ing light. So long as there are beau- tiful conservatives in the world, Princess Pat English Tint will be widely popular because of i ts perfect harmony with all types of beauty. Princess Pat Medium Rouge, a Softly Delicate "Old Rose" Shade There are some types of complexion beauty sodelicatelychildlikeas to re- quire only the softest wildrose flush, and for these Princess Pat Medium Rouge is especially recommended. Its warm, subtle tone is particularly harmonious with those dainty pastel shades of costume —not too em- phatic to detract from the loveliness of the ensemble. The Essence of Your Beauty is the Texture of Your Skin Therefore, no matter whether your preference is for the new gorgeous and fashionable Vivid, the widely popular English Tint, or the softly delicate Medium Rouge, all of the Princess Pat shades are compact or dry rouges. This means that their base is Almond, justas in the famous Princess Pat Almond Base Face Powder. Thus they are not only beautifying to your complexion, but actually beneficial to your skin's fine-grained texture as well. The Princess Pat Way of Applying Color Second only in importance to jour choice of the correct rouge for your complex- ion, is the manner of ap- plyingit. The Princess Pat method has won almost as wide ac- ceptance among beautiful women as Princess Pat rouges themselves. Apply in V-shape, the point of the V toAvard the nose—beginning at the temple, put the color on, slant- ing forward and downward to the high point of the cheekbone, then backward and downward—leaving a space in front of the ear clear of color. Blend softly, and you have duplicated nature's own design. For lasting, even waterproof, result, apply your Tint before powdering. PRINCESS PAT, Ltd. - Chicago, U. S. A. For Perfect Match of Lips and Cheeks Princess Pat Lipstick As a final touch to your beauty it is essential that the color harmony between lips and cheeks should be exact. With English Tint or Medium Rouge use Princess Pat "Natural" Lipstick; with Vivid Rouge, use Princess Pat "Vivid" Lipstick. Keeps the lips soft and pliant—pre- vents dryness or chap. A liberal demonstration packet °fREE — So that you may judge the true merit of Prin- cess Pat Rouge on your own complexion, we have arranged to send a liberal supply entirely without charge. Just mail the coupon. PRINCESS PAT, Ltd., Dept. 26, Chicago Please send me your Demonstration Package. I have checked the shade I desire. D Vivid (the new fashionable shade) D English Tint (very popular) D Medium, (pastel rose) Name Address City State When you write to advertisers please mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 3 PAG
  4. 4. ^MOTION PICTURP nEJI I MAGAZINE L Advertising Section 9f A Party Everyone Can Enjoy If you had a great big group of friends of all ages and conditions, from grand- parents to school children, and from rich families to poor, what kind of enter- tainment could you all enjoy together in a party? A photoplay —the pictures and accom- panying music of the screen. The reason is that the movies contain something for everyone, sentiment and merriment, ad- venture and romance. It is the emotions of men and women that are universal, and it is of the emotions that the photoplay tells, starting gasps, sighs, tears and laughter. Paramount Pictures make life brighter and gayer and more exciting, touching the greyest of days with a little color of rose. You thoughtful people appreciate the in- fluence of the screen today, and you see that no competent judge of entertainment values can deny that Paramount's long lead- ership has been earned season by season. Ask "Is it a Paramount Picture?" and go. You can know no more, whatever you ask, if it's the best you want. a If it's a Paramount Picture, it's the best show in town! tt Every advertisement In MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE is guaranteed.
  5. 5. The Bulletin-Board On which is posted last-minute news about pictures and players I 1 a FOUR years is long enough to go without a vacation, accord- ing to Tom Mix, who has recently packed up his family and gone to Europe. Before sailing, Tony, the famous and beloved horse who shares honors with Tom in his pictures, gave a party for his master at the Hotel Astor. It was not, however, a farewell party, as Tony sailed with the rest of the family and is the guest in Paris of Epinard, the French race-horse. Once more Theda Bara is scheduled to return to the screen. The latest report is that she will play The Unchastened Woman for the Chadwick Pictures Cor- poration. Jack Pickford has been forced to take a complete rest by a bad attack of Kleig eyes. He came to New York and spent his time in a darkened . room at the Am- bassador and wandering about the streets decorated with a pair of dark glasses. The trouble has been quite cleared up now. Constance Bennett ran away from the studios after completing The Goose Woman and came to New York on a combination pleasure and shopping trip. No new production has been announced by D. W. Griffith, but persistent rumors say that his next picture will be the screen version of Marie Corelli's The Sorrows of Satan. Harry T. Morey, who kills someone in every picture in which he appears, and George Hackathorne, who gets himself killed in nearly every part he plays, are scheduled to work to- gether in the near future. They are great friends and Harry says he is looking forward eagerly to killing George at least once. When Thomas Meighan was in Ocala, Florida, making Old Home Weekj he gave a benefit to raise money for the new hos- pital the town was building. In recognition of his services, the trustees decided to name the chil- dren's ward after Mr. Meighan. But Tom had a better idea, and so the children's ward bears the name of Robert Harron, the young star who died three years ago. Pauline Starke, who has" re- cently signed a long-term con- tract with Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer, will do her first work for them in Wrath, the screen title of the stage success, Sun-Up. Conrad Nagel plays opposite her and Lucille La Verne will play the same part she had on the legitimate stage. In the Follies scene of Pretty Ladies, they needed twenty beauti- ful girls for the chorus. Florenz Ziegfeld, who has heretofore left the movies strictly alone, was pressed into service. From J *m^^H ^9L^^m fn %-* --*w J y^* i m 51 1 ; Just before Ben Alexander left New York for Holly- wood he paid a' call on George Arliss, behind the scenes in the theater where he is playing "Old English." Mr. Arliss seems to be scolding Ben. Maybe it's because he was caught trying to do an imitation of his older friend. There is quite a re- semblance there—cant you see it? the photographs of a hundred and fifty lovely extra girls, he selected the twenty who will glorify the Hollywood Extra under the direction of Monta Bell. Barbara La Marr's new pic- ture, The White Monkey, is a screen adaptation of Galsworthy's novel of the same name. Henry Victor, an English actor, who has just come to this country, will be her leading man. Conway Tearle is going back to the simple life in his new pic- ture, Just a Woman. Instead of the sophisticated and unsmil- ing hero he will be seen as a clerk in a steel mill, eating in his shirt sleeves, playing with his baby son—and dominated by his wife. The head of the family is played by Claire Windsor. Rose of the World, Kathleen Xorris' novel, is the first picture Patsy Ruth Miller has made for Warner ESrothers. In Lorraine of the Lions, a Universal feature, Patsy was hailed as the queen of animal trainers. Two of the most unruly lions imaginable be- came as meek as lambs under Patsy's gentle and persuasive in- fluence. The Dark Angel, Robert Mil- ton's Broadway success, has been made into a motion picture for Yihna Banky. She is the German actress whom Samuel Goldwyn has recently brought to this country. George Fitzmaurice is producing her first picture. Ronald Colman, who will play with her, is scheduled to appear in Romeo and Juliet when he has finished work with Miss Banky. Jay Hunt, Madge Bellamy and Ethel Clayton are appearing in Lightmn', under the direction of John Ford. Bebe Daniels says life was very hard while they were mak- ing The Manicure Girl. A lot of scenes had to be taken on Broad.,-ay and Fifth Avenue when there were no crowds and, consequently, the company was at work all night several times, the director's instructions being to sleep in the day-time—if they felt they could. There has been a change in the plans of Warner Brothers. Marie Prevost, who was to have appeared in Why Girls Go Back Home, has started work, instead, on Bobbed Hair. Kenneth Harlan and Louise Fazenda will play with Miss Prevost. There's been a lot of give and take in the movies lately. Fred Newmeyer, Harold Lloyd's director, has been loaned to Syd Chaplin for his new picture, The Man on the Box. Shirley Mason has been borrowed from the Fox Studio to play in The ( Continued on page 13) Voh XXIX, No. 5 MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE JUNE, 1925 Published Monthly by the Brewster Publications, Inc., at 13410 Jamaica Ave., Jamaica, N. Y. Executive and Editorial Offices, 175 Duffield Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. Entered at the Post Office at Jamaica, N. Y., as second-class matter, under the act of March 3rd, 1S79. Printed in the U. S. A. Eugene V. Brewster, President and Editor-in-Chief; Duncan A. Dobie, Jr., Vice-President and Business Manager; George J. Tresham, Circulation Director; E. M. Heinemann, Secretary; L. G. Conlon, Treasurer. Also publishers of Motion Picture Classic and Movie Monthly. Subscription $2.50 a year in advance, including postage in the United States, Cuba, Mexico and Philippines; in Canada, $3.00. Foreign countries, 33.50. Single copies, 25 cents, postage prepaid. U. S. Government stamps accepted. Subscribers must notify us at once of any change of address, giving both old and new address. First copyrighted and published February 21, 1911. Copyrighted, 1925, in United States and Great Britain by Brewster Publications, Inc. 5 PAGi
  6. 6. A Guide to 150 Current Pictures Which are now being shown thruout the United States I Alaskan, The—Xot up to the caliber of story we expect from Tom Meighan. Too convenient and old- fashioned in plot and treat- ment. Carries wonderful backgrounds, however. {Famous Players) As ManDesires—Traces the adventures of English army surgeons in East In- dia and the South Seas. Charged with murder he becomes a pearl fisher and finds romance and tranquillity. Rather com- plicated but offering a satisfying hour. {First National) As No Man Has Loved—An elaborate historical drama of the early days of America founded on E. E. Hale's famous story, The Man Without a Country. Strong patriotism propaganda, well handled and well done. (Fox) —E.V.B. Babbitt—Too wordy in its treatment and never develops the story as it was contained in book. Characters somewhat indefinite. Interesting in spots. (Warner Brothers) Barbara Frietchie—Presents flashes of conflict of North and South, founded on play of same name. Customary plot reveals Northern hero and Southern girl —with romance sweeping aside the song of hate. Has several dramatic scenes, fair action—and fine acting by Florence Vidor. (1 nee- Producers Dis- tributing Corp.) Beloved Brute, The—An exciting melodrama, this—one built around regeneration of fighter who eventually meets his master. Characterization finely developed —and situations carry convincing note. Title-role colorfully played by Victor McLag- len. (Vitagraph) Beloved Vagabond, The—Affords moments of heart appeal and a mild, but fragrant romance of sacrifice as youth gives up girl he loves in order that she marry wealth. Youth after adventurous career marries orphan girl he adopts. Gcod atmosphere, fair acting. (F. B. 0.) Bread—Adaptation of Charles Norris' novel shapes up as conventional film material which intro- duces too much incident in arriving at its climax. Firmly planted that woman's place is in the home. No high lights. Fair entertainment. (Metro- Goldwyn) Broadway Butterfly, A—Sets forth the oft-told tale of the rustic maid who strikes Broadway—and after encountering the inevitable "men about town" teaches them a lesson in deportment and morals. Hackneyed of plot, but quite appetizing. Capable cast here—headed by Dorothy Dcvore. (Warner Brothers) Capital Punishment—Melodrama of the better kind. George Hackathorne and Clara Bow add to their laurels. Gripping and thrilling. (Schulberg- Preferred)—E. V. B. Captain Blood—Tells in vivid fashion a swash- buckling story of piracy on the high seas during the seventeenth century. Adapted irom Sabatini's novel and is saturated with action and color. Highly entertaining. (Vitagraph) Charley's Aunt—A rollicking farce—this. Taken from one of the stage favorites. Shows Syd Chaplin as adroit comedian, equally at home with subtle humor as with slapstick. His masquerade provides a reservoir of laughs. A sure gloom-chaser. (Pro- ducers Distributing Corp.) Cheaper to Marry—Excellent society comedy with Lewis Stone, Conrad Nagel and Marguerite de la Motte. One couple marries and prospers; the other couple defies the conventions and suffers. Brilliant titles and clever direction make this play exceedingly interesting. (Metro-Goldwyn) Christine of the Hungry Heart—The eternal triangle of an unhappy woman longing for love after matrimonial tragedies with two husbands and one lover. Treated in sympathetic fashion, tho it serves nothing new in plot. Florence Vidor brings feeling to the character of the title. Fair enough. (Ince- First National) Chu Chin Chow—An alleged drama of foreign origin and setting. It should have stayed there. Betty Blythe is featured but she hasn't much to offer in this. Dont waste your evening on this tiresome picture. {Wilcox) Clean Heart, The—A. S. M. Hutchinson's novel makes a most compelling photoplay as treated by J. Stuart Blackton and Percy Marmont. Is excep- tionally human and perfectly intelligible. Tells of man conquering his worries. Appealing all the way. Worth your while. (Vitagraph) Code of the Sea —Old-time ingredients in this melodrama, carrying theme of cowardiy youth con- quering himself thru girl's belief in him. Appealing in its action and the vividness of its photography. Fairly well acted Interesting. (Paramount) Coming Through—Tom Meighan appears again in a conventional melodrama—a triumph of courage against heavy obstacles. The star needs the bright human pieces, for there are several luminaries who could put this story over. Obvious and slow—tho convincing in atmosphere. A few good moments. (Paramount) Daddy's Gone a-Hunting—Doesn't convince be- cause of the arbitrary manipulation of the characters. 6 0£ *-^ The father, tiring of domesticity, runs off to Paris — and returns without any amours. He comes to his senses after the death of his child. Fails to extract sympathy even with such clever acting as Percy Marmont and Alice Joyce. give it. (Metro-Goldwyn) Dangerous Innocence—"Ann's an Idiot" shapes up pretty well in celluloid form. Features a young girl's awakening to the call of romance. She emerges into a woman during a cruise from Liverpool to Bom- bay, but discovers the man has had a love affair with her mother. Well handled considering the slight material. Pleasant diversion. ( Universal) Dante's Inferno—Presents in vivid fashion a sermon on what befalls a worshiper of wealth. Modern story linked up with graphic scenes of the Inferno as Dante and Dore conceived them. A real novelty, pictorially satisfying. (Fox) Denial, The—The parental conflict theme, em- ploying a domineering mother who brings tragedy into her daughter's life by compelling her to marry a man she doesn't like. The daughter appears first as having a child of her own—and is confronted with the identical problem. By the flashback the modern mother appreciates the sin of too much interference. Interesting with its atmosphere, but lacking spon- taneity and conviction. (Metro-Goldwyn) Devil's Cargo, The—Treats of the California gold-rush days—and treats it in vivid melodramatic style. The central figures are a young editor and a girl who are driven out of Sacramento. They come back in style. Sustained action. (Paramount) Dick Turpin—Tom Mix hangs up his chaps and bedecks himself in the raiment of a chivalrous knight of Mefrie England. Plays celebrated highwayman in the Fairbanks manner. Stirring incident, enjoy- able humor—and romance makes this a likely pic- ture. Check it off and see it. (Fox) Dressmaker from Paris, The—If you like fash- ion shows, very well. Leatrice Joy in a poor part in a poor show. Ernest Torrence in new garb. Mildred Harris and Allan Forrest supporting. (Paramount) —E. V. B. Dynamite Smith—Charles Ray returns to type of story that made him popular. Plays again the role of a timid youth who overcomes cowardice when goaded by vengeful brute and under spell of romance. Well done—with plenty of physical and mental con- flict. Rugged entertainment. (Ince-Pathe) Enemy Sex, The—The best vehicle Betty Comp- son has had since "The Miracle Man." An Owen Johnson story of a chorus girl who refuses wealth, social position, etc., to bring back the almost ruined life of a youth addicted to drink. Betty Compson irresistible. Excellent supporting cast. At last, a well-done flapper film. (Paramount) Enticement—A frank exposition adapted from an equally frank novel depicting the folly of fanning the love of an old affection after one has become married. Emphasizes the "new freedom." Not for the children. (First National) Excuse Me—Rupert Hughes' story and stage suc- cess makes a capital light comedy—one which ex- ploits the adventure of an eloping couple—who when they board a train encounter all kinds of trouble. Plenty of high jinks—and plenty of laughs. Bert Roach as a drunk in an upper berth steals the acting honors. (Metro-Goldwyn) Feet of Clay—This is a Cecil B. De Mille produc- tion—the story of which is overwhelmed by the back- grounds and appointments. Has a romance and a series of counterplots—and exploits a flapper wife in search of jazz. (Paramount) Female, The—Betty Compson in South African surroundings. Unhappily married to a native of the veld, she does not discourage the attentions of an Englishman arriving on the scene, and we have the too familiar triangle situation again, with the Eng- lishman triumphing. Noah Beery, as the Boer, does best acting. Picture only fair. (Paramount) Fifth Avenue Models—The Cinderella pattern again—done with first-rate sentiment and heart ap- peal. Working girl discovers a Prince Charming who saves her from disgrace. The human touches make it fairly convincing. Enjoyable. ( Universal) Fighting American, The—Comedy-romance capitalizing the fighting qualities of young American who overcomes every obstacle in winning the girl of his heart. A familiar movie theme treated in a light vein. Well titled, and plaved in spirited fashion by Pat O'Malley. (Universal) Find Your Man—A deceptively titled melo- drama woven around youth and his dog in a lumber camp; not a Northwest Mounted story, but the tale of a dog's loyalty to his master thru thick and thin. Rin-Tin-Tin makes an otherwise tedious melodrama interesting by uncanny intelligence. (Warner Brothers) Folly of Vanity—Pictur- izes a fantastic dream of a woman who becomes conscience- stricken when pursued by a wealthy bounder. She descends to Neptune's domains and takes us on a colorful cruise. The moral poorly brought out. Lavish with- out much meaning. Has » photographic appeal. (Fox) Fools in the Dark— Here is a picture which pokes fun at old-fashioned, serious melodrama. The paid kidnappers, the mad scientist, the oily Hindu, the young adventure-seeker, his fiancee—they are ail here, amid comedy settings. Matt Moore, Patsy- Ruth Miller and Tom Wilson excellent. A good mix- ture of thrills and comedy. (F.B.U.) Forbidden Paradise—A sophisticated modern romance dealing with a fictional queen whose greatest weakness is men. Pola Negri as the al.uring queen is the best she has yet been in an American-made film. Well supported by Rod La Rocque, Adolphe Menjou, and Pauline Starke. Fine food for sophisticates. (Ernst Lubitsch- Paramount) Forty Winks—The missing papers are found in this bright and breezy comedy—found by Raymond Griffith in the role of a comic British lord who saves the honor of the family along with the papers. Grif- fith is immense. Theodore Roberts is back with his cigar. Thoroly amusing. (Paramount) Gerald Cranston's Lady—Domestic drama based upon marriage of convenience which results in a triangle when couple misunderstand each other; love and happiness result eventually. A story with- out much suspense or surprise, but situations are logically developed and the acting is good. A little above the average play of its kind. (Fox) Girl Shy—A high speed and srarkling comedy from that Lloyd boy. Laughs balance the thrills — and there is real invention in 'tie scenes. Its mo- ments of heart appeal, drama and farce are perfectly blended. Timid youth develops courage. Lloyd is immense. We dare you to stay away! (Palhe) Golden Bed, The—Cecil B. De Mille again with all his taste for opulent display. Story is much too long to trace the human wreckage left by a woman who plays with men for the fascination of the game. Mostly appealing to the eye. Irene Rich gives her usual dependable performance. (Paramount) Good Bad Boy, The—Packed with enjoyable humor and heart interest, this juvenile study cer- tainly affords a satisfying hour. Youngster has repu- tation as being a bad boy, but lives it down. (Principal) The Great Divide—A Western drama quite above the average with Alice Terry at her best and Conway Tearle and Wallace Beery also. 'Nough said. Then there is a wonderful flood scene which is a real thriller. Dont miss it. (Metro-Goldwyn ) — E. V. B. Heart Buster, The—Tom Mix sees to it that the Westerns should be treated to a dose from the comedy faucets. Here he's a cowboy who resorts to ex- treme measures to prevent girl from marrying a scoundrel. Plenty of action and a number of laughs. Mix has had better ones. (Fox) Her Love Story—Smacks of the George Barr McCutcheon school of mythical kingdom romances. Gloria Swanson adopts the role of a princess who loves a young captain of the guard. She is forced into an unpleasant marriage with an aging monarch. Below the Swanson standard. Appeal rests with at- mosphere and characterization. (Paramount) Her Night of Romance—One of the best of the Constance Talmadge comedy caprices. Scenes laid in England deal with impecunious nobleman hounded into a proposal of marriage to an American heiress. Farcical complications and the spirit of action and acting .make it enjoyable. (First National) His Hour—Romantic drama is unfolded here—of the pre-war days in Russia. Elinor Glyn is the author and she builds exotic love affair between young prince and an English widow. Affords a pleasant hour. Ail- een Pringle and John Gilbert are convincing as the lovers. (Metro-Goldwyn) Hit and Run—The best baseball yarn ever screened. Takes busher from tall alfalfa and after amusing and lively high jinks places him in World Series. The melodrama concerns the ever-lurking gamblers. Novel film and entertaining all the way. (Universal) Hot Water—Something new for Harold Lloyd in that he is married right off the reel. Develops trou- ble with the in-laws—and then the fun begins. Volumes of laughs thruout and the incident sparkles along at a lively pace. Up to his high standard. Sure fire. (Palhe) How to Educate a Wife—Develops around the average American home and tells in lifelike manner those episodes which mark the journey of many a matrimonial bark. Lives up to its title in scenes of intimate farce. Mingles jazz with amusing domestic complications. Breezy and bright. (Warner Brothers) In Every Woman's Life—Uncovers the usual tri- angle theme, tho it goes it one better in that three men seek the same woman. As it is her place to make the ultimate choice, she selects the man she loves. Packs away all the necessary elements—and packs
  7. 7. «EMTO3SP"1 satisfactory speed. Marc MacDermott shines. (First National) In Hollywood with Potash & Perlmutter Reveals clever and jolly satire of studio life with Montague Glass' celebrated partners trying to break into the "fillums." Delectable burlesque which ex- poses in realistic and comic fashion the life of the movies. Capitally titled —and capitally acted. (First National) Inez from Hollywood—-This was once known as "The Worst Woman in Hollywocd." Revolves around famous film actress with publicity complex who is not so black as she is painted. Scornful of men. she tries to save innocent sister from them—and fails. Not especially convincing —and rather trite, but Lewis Stone and Anna Q. Nilsson make it inter- esting. (First National) Introduce Me—Refined comedy that should please everybody and put Douglas MacLean in the front ranks of light comedians of the screen. (As- sociated Exhibitors) —E. V. B. Iron Horse, The—The much-talked-of feature dealing with the late sixties in the West when the first transcontinental railroad was built and completed. Thrilling drama mixed with much comedy. Educa- tional, historic, instructive. Running at the Lyric Theater, N. Y., since August 28th, and still running. (Fox) It Is- the Law—Mystery melodrama, this—oni carrying out a youth's diabolical scheme of vengeance against his best friend for stealing the affections of the only girl. Taken from stage play and holds at- tention with its vivid action, thrills and the charac- terization by Arthur Hohl. See it and shiver with excitement. (Fox) Janice Meredith-—Elaborately mounted romance of the American Revolution, adapted from well- known story of same name. The love sparks domi- nate scenes, but there are sufficient troop movements (the crossing of the Delaware being conspicuous) to grip you. Marion Davies is appealing and she is surrounded by talented cast. (Cosmopolitan) K—The Unknown—Inclined to be unduly sen- timental and drama seems unconvincing. Adapted from best seller but story loses in transference to silversheet. Treats of a surgeon who sacrifices every- thing when he believes himself guilty of carelessness. Kinds redemption in surgical manner. Pretty well acted. (Universal) Lady of the Night—Presents tw.o girls of differ- ent stations of life who fall in love with the same man. One is a reformatory graduate—the other an alumna of a boarding-school. The former sacrifices her hap- piness when she discovers her rival is getting the upper hand. Made interesting thru directorial touches and the exceptionally clever performance of Norma Shearer in the dual role. (M etro-Goldwyyi) The Lady—An unusually interesting story, full of pathos. This was all that was needed to make Norma Talmadge the "Bernhardt of the Screen." (First National)—E. V. B. Last of the Duanes, The—Plenty of old-fash- ioned trigger-finger play here—with plenty of hard riding and hazardous thrills. Affords Tom Mix an opportunity to breathe life into an "up and at 'em" Western. A sure time killer. (Fox) Last Laugh, The—A German film of unusual beauty and artistry. The story deals with old age and poverty, and is a grim piece of realism marred by an unconvincing happy ending. Emil Jannings' nuk is splendid. (UFA) Last Man on Earth, The—Another novelty from the Fox lots, depicting the awful state of the world when men no longer follow at women's heels. Fan- tastic, but slight of plot. The women discover last man hiding in jungle —and there's a right between two Amazons to win him. Amusing and abounding in pretty girls in negligee. (Fox) Learning to Love—A tiresome society comedy as usual. Constance Talmadge is beautiful and attrac- tive in anything, but she can do more than look pretty and laugh if they will only find her a good story. (First National) Life's Greatest Game—Exploits our national pastime —baseball—as it was played in the days of the Orioles and in this day by the Giants. Complete with hokum and sentiment, but manages to entertain because of its incident and atmosphere. (F. B. O.) Lightning Rider, The—Not startlingly original is this Western, but it affords an exciting hour when the Black Mask terrorizes the countryside with his night riding. Good old hold-up stuff—with ro- mance to temper the trigger touches. (Producers Distributing Corp.) Little Robinson Crusoe—Deals with adventure as sponsored by Jackie Coogan who lives over the days of the original Crusoe. Carries an abundance of comedy, drama and thrills. Certain of its appeal to the children. Interesting. (Metro-Goldiryn) Lost World, The—Something entirely dfferent let us call it a scientific comedy. If you want to see all the strange prehistoric mammalia, some 100 feet long and high, which Wallace Beery, Bessie Love, Lloyd Hughes, Lewis Stone and Bull Montana found on the Amazon, here you are, with plenty of thrills as well as laughter. (First National) Lover of Camille, The—Tells a tale of unrequited love—and doesn't tell it very well. Adapted from Belasco's Deburau, and loses its spark and vitality and atmosphere in the transference from stage to screen. Lacks movement and is mostly char- acterization. (Warner Bros.) Man in Blue, The—Place a cop in a foreign quarter of a large city—and you have your romance made to order. Here Herbert Rawlinson, making a good representa- tion pf the Irish officer, wins an Italian belle away from swarthy politicians. Good incident, but al- ways conventional. Fair entertainment. ( Universal) Manhandled—An accurate study of youth in love and at war with love. Presents girl who keeps to her ideals despite the temptations thrust her way. Outwits the men with her humor. Keen satire here —and admirably done. Gloria Swanson at her best. (Paramount) Manhattan—Elevates Richard Dix to stardom in a role wherein he is called upon to display some acrobatic prowess. It is a romance of Gotham /evolving around a wealthy idler going after thrills and adventure—and finding them and a bride to boot. Fast action and vivid incident keep it moving. (Paramount) Man Must Live, A—Gives Richard Dix a chance to extract sympathy in an unpleasant role—the star playing a reporter on a scandal sheet who rebels when forced to compromise his best friends. Ob- vious, but Dix puts it over. (Paramount) Man Who Came Back, The—This appears about the best picture based upon the redemption theme ever made; While action is convenient and obvious, somehow it carries a ring of truth. Is graphic and colorful. George O'Brien ideal : n t' tie-role. (Fox) Man Who Fights Alone, The—Stresses self- sacrifice so much that realities and humanities are lost. Features a husband paralyzed who believes in- truder—rhis best friend—is stealing his wife's love. All ends well. Fair entertainment—with William Farnum exercising too much emotion as central figure. (Paramount) Mansion of Aching Hearts, The—Suggested by song of yesteryear, but going back to ideas which have been rejected in this modern day. Exploits a stern-hearted father who turns his wife and child from home. He makes a belated "about face" but the finish is too arbitrary to ring true. Ethel Clayton tries to bring conviction to role of the harassed wife. (Schulberg) Marriage Cheat, The—Just an ordinary film with a South Seas setting. Offers a triangle which never leaves its obvious groove. Right and Might triumph. Abounds in atmospheric backgrounds— authentic and colorful—and acting is competent. Just fair. (First National) Merton of the Movies—Executed with all the flavor as expressed in the story and in the stage ver- sion. The screen-struck youth's voice is silenced. But he accomplishes so much more thru the scope of the camera than he did on the stage. Brightand amus- ing—with Glenn Hunter in his original stage role. The star and the director put it over. (Paramount) Midnight Express, The—Lives up to its title witli the action concentrated around the fast train and the car shops. Plot deals with disowned youth who makes good by starting at the bottom. Wins love of engineer's daughter and flags the train to prevent the wreck. Lots of physical action. Ob- vious, but entertaining. (C. B. C.) Midnight Molly—The dual role is given to Evelyn Brent in this triangle story. It revolves around a feminine Raffles and a playful wife of the political candidate. The former doubles for the latter and saves the husband from losing votes. Far-fetched, but made fairly interesting thru the sincere per- formance. (F. B. 0.) Miracle of the Wolves, The—A thrilling, spec- tacular romance of fifteenth century France. It is beautifully produced and acted, and Yvonne Sergyl as Jeanne, the heroine, is charming. It is full of im- pressive and convincing battle scenes, and is thoroly satisfactory. (Societe Fraucaise d'Editions de Romans Filmcs) Miss Bluebeard—A slight romantic comedy of a French actress' adventures—played by Bebe Daniels in a new bob and a new collection of gowns. She finds herself with two husbands on her hands—but it is proved she's no bigamist. Fairly good. (Paramount) Monsieur Beaucaire—Rudolph Valentino re- turns to screen in impressive picture adapted from Tarkington's story and play. Backgrounds unex- celled—and story moves with good pace and releases sheer romance. Fine direction noticeable in treat- ment of plot, characters—and the manner of its mounting. Well worth while. (Paramount) Monster, The—A serio-comic drama meant to be very gruesome but in reality very silly. Even Lon Clianey does not save it. (Metro-Gold-wyn) —E. V. B. Navigator, The—Buster Keaton, the ' 'frozen- faced" comedian, tops all his previous efforts with this wonderful comedy. Like Lloyd, he goes after new inventions and gets them. Shows misadventures of hero and heroine who are adrift on an ocean liner. Ingenious all the way. A sure gloom chaser. (Metro- Gold'ii'yn) New Lives for Old—A modern drama, which, tho not particularly unusual, gives Betty Compson a chance to be her usual attractive, vivacious self. There are one or two scenes that get over big and the picture as a whole is entertaining. (Paramount) —E.V.B. New Toys—Richard Barthelmess—supported by his charming wife, Mary Hay, has a triangle story this time. There is a fresh, humorous twistlwhen an old flame comes back into his life. The piece is radi- cally different from anything the star has appeared in before. First-rate entertainment. (First National) North of 36—The story of a great cattle drive across the plains in pioneer days. An heroic effort, scenically and photographically. Lois Wilson, Ernest Torrence, jack Holt, and Noah Beery are the stars. (Paramount) Not One to Spare—A soothing little storv. tender with sentiment. Sl.ghtly frail for five reels, but which should pull at the heart-strings of those who still have hearts. Based upon poem which appeared in one of our schoolday primers The mother refuses to give up one of her brood and wins the father around to her way of thinking. Simplicity counts. (Pro- ducers Distribut : ng Corp.) Oh, You Tony—Tom M ix busts into polit'cs here when he becomes a lobbyist in Washington for some of the boys back home. Learns "etiket" and gets "buncoed" by Washington flapper. Tony, the pony, figures at the end and saves the day for Mix. He wins the race. Interesting thru its humor. (Fox) On Thin Ice—A familiar type of crook melo- drama which for three reels carries out a first-rate line of action, incident and suspense. In treating the romance, the plot is inclined to sag. Effects a crook's redemption and is a good picture of its kind. Tom Moore is excellent as the redeemed criminal. (Warner Brothers) One Law for the Woman—This is an old-timer, adapted from a Blaney melodrama of yesteryear. Deals with events following the crooked mine deal foisted on the hero. Youth saves girl and others when the villain floods the mine. Mostly physical action. (Vitagraph) One Night in Rome—Laurette Taylor succeeds in making this interesting thru a colorful and con- vincing performance. A duchess after a series of dramatic adventures succeeds in clearing herself of the charge that she caused her husband to kill him- self. Neatly mounted. (Metro-Goldwyn) One Year to Live—Another sex drama with Paris setting. Antonio Moreno and Rosemary Thebv at their best, with Aileen Pringle and Dorothy Mackaill not quite so good. An old theme entertainingly handled. Above the average. (First National) — E. V.B. Only Woman, The—Norma Talmadge appears in one of the oldest formulas—that of the girl who ties herself to a mercenary marriage to save a finan- cially embarrassed father. Obvious, but well done by the director, Sidney Olcott, and the star. Eugene O'Brien not so convincing as the scapegrace son who finds redemption. (First National) Open AH Night—Very sophisticated this, dressed up with novel treatment. Director becomes bold in developing plot around wife who tires of her meek and conventional husband only to return to him when she becomes disillusioned with ill-mannered bike rider. Smart titles, good characterizations— and proper atmosphere. (Paramount) Painted Lady, The—This melodrama contains two themes—one revolving around a girl hounded by the law—t lie other featuring a youth seeking ven- geance against man responsible for death of his sister. Far-fetched and often lurid, but thoroly absorbing. (Fox) Pampered Youth—A movie title is tacked on Tarkington's "The Magnificent Ambersons." Still it is not enough to destroy the spirit and flavor of story. Carries humanities and realistic atmosphere. Charmingly played by Alice Calhoun, Charlotte Merriam and Cullen Landis. (Vitagraph) Percy—The story of boy, trained to play the vio- lin and do esthetic dancing. Circumstances land him at the Mexican border, and, from then on. things keep moving at a fast clip. Charles Ray is at his best and the picture is excellent. (Pathc) Peter Pan—A beautiful picture, carrying out all the Barrie charm and whimsy. Certainly sustains the spirit of youth. Has rich romance and adventure suggested thru fine spirit of make-believe. Betty Bronson an ideal Peter who gives a captivating per- formance. See this and take the children. (Para- mount) Peter the Great—Emil Jannings, the Brooklyn German, stumps thru this picture as the great Rus- sian ruler. A vivid film, majestic in its settings and carrying out all the anticipated pomp and ceremony. Interesting historical drama. (Paramount) The Rag Man—Jackie Coogan at his best. In- teresting and laughable thruout. It lacks artistic finish but never- theless ranks very high and should please. (Metro-Goldwyn) Ramshackle House — Pre- sents a murder mystery which is a bit different from the usual run of such stories. The crime is framed on innocent man who is protected by the girl when a mob scours the countryside for him. Good of its kind. Betty Comp- son is the heroine. (Producers Distributing Corp.) Re-Creation of Brian Konr, The—Harold Bell Wright can truthfully say that this is "as I wrote it." Tells a story of a youth's redemption brought about by a kindly, sympathetic (Cont. on page 127) 7 PAG I t
  8. 8. Clippings from the Motion Picture Magazine of June, 1915 Which will freshen the memory of our old readers and enlighten our new ones on "Who Was Who" and "What Was What" ten years ago NOTE: The picture gallery contained portraits of the following players, some of whom have long been for- gotten : Violet MacMillan, Bessie Learn, Ann Little, Mignon Anderson, Lilie Les- lie, Richard Stanton, Marguerite Clark, Crane Wilbur, Frances M. Nel- son, Isabel Rea, Louise Vale, Augusta Anderson, Helen Bray, Florence LaBadie (since de- ceased), Lois Weber, Gertrude McCoy, Maurice Costello, King Baggott, Sidney Drew (since deceased), Jane Morrow (after- wards Mrs. Sidney Drew), Bobby Connelly (since de- ceased), S. Rankin Drew (since deceased), and Alice Joyce. Ben Greet Players, is now a Peerless player." "Again the quarrel is on—Who will win Dorothy Kelly? George Cooper, the vil- lain, still pursues her, but James Morrison is right on the trail." Quotes I "/Chester C. Conklin, the • ^^ Keystone Comedy acrobat and laugh-producer, is so funny that even the pianists giggle and make discords when he chuckles down from the screen. His greatest ambition in life is to drive away grouches. After making himself dear to every mother's son in Oskaloosa, Iowa, his native town, he branched out with the Majestic Comedy Company and thence to Key- stone, portraying and charac- terizing the 'home folks,' includ- ing the Germans of his town. 'Conk' believes that big photo- plays from big books and big novels have taken a grip upon us and that big comedy will come into its own, too." "Lottie Pickford, sister to little Mary, has joined the American Company, with Irving Cummings in The Diamond from the Sky." "Four or five years ago, Florence Law- rence, Marion Leonard, Florence Turner, Mary Pickford and Gene Gauntier were the most famous of screen stars. Miss Turner went to Europe to form her own company, Miss Lawrence has retired. Miss Leonard has a company of her own and Miss Pickford alone has stuck to it." "Maurice Costello has given up directing and will again star with Norma Talmadge, under the direction of Van Dyke Brooke." "The Chaplin mustache is spreading — not the mustache, but its popularity—and eyebrows on the upper lip may again come in fashion." "Louise Glaum (N. Y. M. P. Co.) is sporting a real Scotch hat." "Matt Moore, brother of Tom and Owen, is now playing opposite Mary Fuller." "James Kirkwood has deserted Mary Pickford for Hazel Dawn and come back to New York, but is now directing Dorothy Bernard at Jacksonville." "Kathlyn Williams has bought a $150 Panama hat for herself." "Chester Conklin (Keystone) was once a circus clown, and he doesn't seem to change much." "An illustrated Fashion Department for this magazine is among the new things." "Priscilla Dean, formerly of the Bio- graph and still with the Shakespearean 8 I LOVE to go to Motion Picture shows. Mary Pickford and Blanche Sweet are my favorites on the screen. 1 enjoy seeing some of my own pictures, and I like to criticize myself. Whenever I see myself on the screen, I always think if I could do it over again I would make some little change. I always try to remember some slight expression or movement that I could im- prove upon, and when I have a similar part I try to make the best out of it that I can. —From an interviezv it "This is one ad- vantage of being in pictures. You can see yourself as others see you, and if you are a con- s c i e n t ious critic you always see room for im- provement. "I love to be in comedy, and when- ever I am cast in a com- edy or a comedy-drama I am happy. I like to dress up for old-fashioned parts. I take a special delight in making up for a grotesque character. It is quite a relief when I can stop playing the heavy dra- matic parts and play a comedy role." ith Dorothy Gish, June, 1915 Motion Picture Classics Judith of Bcthulia (Biograph). The Birth of a Nation (Mutual). Cabiria (Italia). Hearts Adrift (Famous Players). The Tigress (Alco). From the Manger to Cross (Kalem). The Battle Hymn of the Re- public (Vitagraph). the Extras The Standing of the Players in the "Great Cast Contest" 1. Leading Man Votes Francis X. Bushman 609,905 2. Leading Woman Mary Pickford 580,750 3. Old Gentleman W. Christie Miller 724,830 4. Old Ladx Mary Maurice 1,010,755 5. Character Man Harry Morey 350,000 6. Character ll T oman Julia S. Gordon 490,605 7. Comedian (Male) Charles Chaplin 767,955 8. Comedian (Female) Mabel Normand 701,530 9. Handsome Young Man J. Warren Kerrigan 422,765 10. Beautiful Young Woman Anita Stewart 494,705 11. Villain Jack Richardson 540,235 12. Child Helen Costello 634,380 John Bunny rPHERE was an old comic named Bunny, li'hose antics were painfully -funny; When asked, "Does it pay?" He said. "Somewhat that way— I've szvapped my loose flesh for loose money." "On April 5th, Mr. Jess Wil- lard knocked out Mr. Jack Johnson. But how you are going to see it on the screen is a mystery, because, alas ! about three years ago Congress passed a law forbidding the importa- tion of prize-fight films into this, the land of the spree and the home of the depraved." "Pearl White wishes us to thank the many who have sent her presents of slippers, aprons, pillows, etc., but she insists that she cannot wear a No. 1-A shoe on a 4K>-B foot." "Francis X. Bushman has just returned from a visit to the Panama-Pacific Exposition." "J. Warren Kerrigan plays a real character part, a Mexican greaser, in The Guardian of the Flocks (Victor)." "INSERT: 'The kiss that comes here was cut out by the censors.' William V. Taylor suggests this : Since kissing is unsanitary and immoral, Long Live the Censors !" "The time must come when there will be films 600 feet long, films 1,200 feet long, films 1,800 feet long. etc. Now there must be 1,000 feet, 2.000 feet, or multiples thereof. The present plan will soon be a back number, I think." "Exit Ford Sterling, enter Charles Chap- lin. Old Father Time carves out a mile- stone in Motion Pictures every now and then. Since Sterling is now back with Keystone and Chaplin is out, nobody knows who will be IT next year." "The Yale Bowl seats 70,000 but will not hold the New Haven admirers of Mary Pick- ford, Charles Chaplin and Crane Wilbur." "You say, that since seeing Mary Pick- ford in Cinderella and Marguerite Clark in Wildfloiver and The Crucible, you are inclined to take the former down from her throne and substitute the latter." (From The Answer Man.) What They Were Doing a Few Years Ago sup- The T ioxel Barrymore (Vitagraph) •L/ ported William Faversham in World and His Wife in 1909. Lillian Russell starred in Wildfire at the Liberty Theater, September, 1908. Thomas Ince was in "big-time" vaude- ville in 1909, in a one-act sketch, with Marie Falls as leading woman. Nov., 1909, Gladys Hulette (Edison) sup- ported Henry Miller in The Faith Healer; in 1912 she played in Little Women.
  9. 9. Advertising Section OTION PICTU MAGAZINE T No C. O. D. Nothing to Pay for AHaaoninuan on Arrival Not a penny now. Just mail the coupon and Hartman, the Largest Home Furnishing Concern in the World, will send you this splendid complete 32-Piece Aluminum Cooking Set, and with it absolutely FREE the 10-Piece Combination Kitchen Set and 9-Piece Canister Set. Pay only the small transporta- tion charge on arrival. No C. O. D. Use all three sets SO days on Free Trial, and if not more than satisfied, send them back and we will pay transportation charge both ways. If you keep them, pay only for Aluminum Set, a little each month. Keep both the Kitchen Set and Canister Set as gifts from Hartman. They are Free. Complete 32-Piece Heavy Gauge Aluminum Cooking Set This is Hartman's famous, special, selected set of heavy gauge Aluminumware—a com- plete cooking outfit, light to handle, easy to clean, always bright as silver. Will never chip, crack or rust. So durable that we guarantee it Send Post Card Today For our FREE Copy of Catalog No. f 747g Bargain Catalog Hundreds of pages, many in actual colors, of the world's greatest bargains in furniture, rugs, car- pets, draperies, sewing machines, silverware, watches, etc.—all sold on easy monthly payment terms and SO days' free trial. FREE GIFTS Book explains how you get Glassware, Silver- ware, Jewelry, Table Linens, etc., Free with purchases. "Let Hartman Feather YOUR Nest" for life. 82 utensils —everything you need for baking, boiling, roasting, frying. And, think of it— Nearly a Year to Pay This offer proves that Hartman gives the world's most liberal terms and the world's greatest values in dependable merchandise. You pay only transportation charges on arrival. Then, if after 30 days' trial you decide to keep the goods, pay a little each month for the Aluminum Set—not a penny to pay for the Kitchen Set and the Canister Set. Take nearly a year to pay. Offer is limited. Mail coupon NOW, while you can get these wonderful Free Gifts. Order by No. 417GMA15. Price for Aluminum Set, $18.95. No money down. $2.00 monthly. lO-Piece Kitchen Set and 9-Piece Canister Set are Free. FfOll^flC 10-Piece Kitchen Set W% Has Has and 9-Pc. Canister Set Both sets free with Aluminum Set. Kitchen Set includes: Potato Masher, Mixing Spoon, Measuring Spoon, Ice Pick, Egg and Cream B eater, Can Opener,Vegetable and Pan Brush, Fork, Egg and Cake Turner,WaIl Rack. All havewhiteenameled handlesand hang on wall rack. Canister Set includes: Large containersforTea, Coffee and Sugar, small containers for Pepper, Cinnamon. Allspice, Nutmeg, Cloves and Ginger, all enameled in colors with black lettering designating con tents. Offer limited. Use Coupon Only When Ordering Aluminum Set. Mail It Today! I FURNITURE & CARPET CO. j CHICAGO j I UADTMAII FURNITURE &CARPET CO. . Hrlil I lYlHrl Dept. 7478 Chicago, III. I Send the : 32-Piece Complete Aluminum Cooking Set No. 417GMA15, Price $18.95, I and with it 10-Piece Kitchen Set and 9-Piece Canister Set, I absolutely FREE. Will pay transportation charges on arrival. I am to have 30 days' free trial. If not satisfied, I will ship all three sets back and you will pay transporta- Ition charges both ways. If I keep them, I will pay you $2 monthly until the price of the Aluminum Set, $18.95, is paid. Kitchen Set and Canister Set are FREE. Title re- mains with you until final payment is made. Name.. R. F. D., Box No. or Street and No. _ Largest Home Furnishing Concern in the World I Town State. When you write to advertisers please mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 9 PAGt
  10. 10. «S!^R E Advertising Section See the Photoplays that "Must be Fine" COME authors' names ^ have magic in them —you know that any story by them must be fine. In the same way you can always count on enjoying a "First National Picture." First National stands for all the resources and the knack that can contribute to the making of splendid photoplays —drawing on the greatest books and plays for stories, employ- ing gifted actors and di- rectors, all with the idea of creating superb enter- tainment. "His Supreme Moment" HP HIS picturization of May Edginton's novel, *• "World Without End," is another fine production from Samuel Goldwyn and George Fitzmaurice. You Avill find that popular young hero, Ronald Colman, in the role of a mining engineer who adopts unusual methods to win the heart of the girl he loves. Blanche Sweet is featured with Mr. Colman, and others in the cast are Kathlyn Myers, Belle Bennett and Cyril Chadvvick. "His Supreme Moment" is a love drama you will not soon forget. "Chickie" "/^HICKIE" is the love story of a little ^-' stenographer who dreamed and hoped some day to say good-by to a typewriter and revel in the luxury of a beautiful home pro- vided by a millionaire husband. And while eligible millionaires are few and far between, Chickie was attractive. But then, of course, the only man she ever could love came along to stand between her and her dream. Dorothy Mackaill plays the title-role and John Bowers is featured with her. They are seen on the left. Every advertisement in MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE is guaranteed.
  11. 11. Advertising Section lne>l I MAGAZINE t "The Necessary Evil" TN every picture in which that young actor, -*- Ben Lyon, appears he is winning new ad- mirers. This time you will find him in a particularly appealing role—as a lad who inherits a disposition to care-free wildness, gets into a scrape at college and, for his own good, is sentenced to live in a torrid land. And Viola Dana plays the part of the charming girl with whom the high-spirited young man and his own foster-father both fall in love. "Fine Clothes" JOHN M. STAHL, with an array of such suc- cesses as "Why Men Leave Home" and "Hus- bands and Lovers" behind him, has produced an- other delightful comedy drama in "Fine Clothes." On the stage it enjoyed a long run under the title of "Fashions for Men." Its central figure is the simple- minded Peter, who, because he can see nothing but good in anyone, finally takes the evil out of the hearts about him. Percy Marmont plays Peter. On the right are Alma Rubens and Lewis Stone, the other principals. Louis B. Mayer presents the picture. Pictures You Should See "Sally"—Colleen Moore in the title-role of Flo Ziegfeld's most famous musical comedy. Lloyd Hughes and Leon Errol head the supporting cast. "Neiv Toys"—Starring Richard Barthelmess, with Mary Hay (Mrs. Barthelmess) in the leading femi- nine role. It is a new type of Barthelmess picture—a comedy of newlywed life. A John S. Robert- son production. "Declasse"—Beautiful C o r i n n e Griffith in the screen version of Ethel Barrymore's famous stage success. A gorgeous society drama. "My Son"—An Edwin Carewe production starring Nazimova, with Jack Pickford in a featured role. A drama of a New England fishing village. "Heart of a Siren"—A drama of the play-places of Europe featuring Barbara La Marr and Conway Tearle. "One-Way Street"—An Ameri- can boy goes adventuring in Lon- don society. Featuring Ben Lyon, Anna Q. Nilsson and Marjorie Daw. When you write to advertisers please mention MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE. 11 PAGt
  12. 12. A scene from "The Covered Wagon," which was given second place by the critics in their list of the five best pictures of all time The Greatest Pictures Ever Produced What America's leading critics have to say about it ASHORT time ago we wrote to about Bagdad, The Birth of a Nation, Broken nation, which most of us had forgotten, one hundred of the leading review- Blossoms, Peter Pan and The Four Horse- Of course, both of these pictures must be ers in this country, asking them to men, in the order named, and she adds that classed as great, but the majority dont help us find out what were the five greatest the first two must of necessity be included think that they are quite in the same class pictures ever produced. The returns are in any list. with Aliss Steele's other three : The not yet all in, but we have received enough Mr. Carlton Miles of the Minneapolis Hunchback of Notre Dame, Orphans of answers already to indicate the trend of Journal places The Cabinet of Dr. Call- the Storm, and The Covered Wagon. opinion. In a later issue we shall give the c/ari first on his list, and The Golem fourth. complete results and also the opinions of Perhaps Mr. Miles is an artist, and if so, ]y[ R- Haskell of the Albany Press and these critics on the fifteen greatest pic- he is probably an impressionist or futurist. News selects He li ho Gets Slapped, tures of the past six months. Some of These two pictures created a sensation in The Birth of a Nation, Broken Blossoms, these critics have been kind enough to their time, but they were so different from Robin Hood, and The Hunchback of Notre write profound reasons for their selec- other pictures that" the general public failed Dame. It will be noted that Mr. Haskell, tions, and some have qualified their opinions to appreciate them. 1,ke mam/ others, chooses Robin Hood in by stating that one picture was better than The same maybe true of The Last Laugh, preference to Mr. Fairbanks' later picture, another because of certain features and which was spoken of so highly recently by The Thief of Bagdad. He places He Jf ho points of quality; and we intend to give all the critics. After seeing such asplen- Gets Slapped first, and this requires some our readers the benefit of some of these did spectacle as The Sea Hazvk, or The courage, because the majority do not agree scholarly dissertations. Thief of Bagdad, the average person would wlth hlm but those who have seen this look very lightly upon The Last Laugh Lon Chaney picture, and who criticized it Tx one sense, it is almost absurd to at- because it has none of the magnificence of regardless of its popularity and money- tempt to name the five greatest pictures the former and none of the marvelous making proclivities, will hesitate a long of all time, not only because of the differ- scenes of splendor and beauty. Perhaps while before they omit it from any list Of ences of opinion and the difference of view- we are all influenced too much by the the five best pictures. point, but because, as Mr. W. C. Howe of latter. Miss Margaret Bean of the Spokane, the Exhibitors' Trade-Review says: "How Washington, Spokesman-Review says: "As can you consistently contrast a comedy like rriHE selection of Mr. J. G. Ortega, of the to the selection of the five best pictures of Hot Water with The Lost World, for in- X. Cincmundial, is quite interesting. He a^ time, I find you have set us picture re- stance? Both are excellent in their own states that in making the selection: "We viewers no easy task. Selection without line." And yet, nearly every one of the did not take in consideration the plays that the aid of some kind of classification is critics put down The Birth of a Nation as have made more money, nor those whose difficult. Consequently, I have taken as one of the five. It is almost unanimous. names have become a household word, nor my basis of selection, not the pictures that This leads to the conclusion that there vet again those which thru publicity or have pleased me most, but the ones that is at least one picture which stands out other means are considered models of tech- seem to exert the greatest influence on the above all others. This being true, it is nique, continuity or entertainment. The making of pictures." quite possible that there are four others choice was made from the purely artistic Her selection is Passion, Abraham Lin- that stand out equally strong. It is im- poj nt f view, based on wholesome merit, coin, The Miracle Man, The Covered material whether it is a comedy, like Hot pathos, brilliant presentation and commend- Wagon and A Woman of Paris. Water, or a historical spectacle like The able actin°' We nlead °-uiltv however to ttt -« e .1 Rirth ni a Mntim, or a <;irrm1p littlp rlrama t 1 A A ? lu ~. « * ~ V7E Will llOW give a Summary of thetin tt op a Nation, or a simple little drama have rendered judgment in the matter ac- VV „„f _B ft,„c r ° ^^^.^a ™ -ti-, v,v» like ToVablc David, or a stupendous fan- cording t0 the J standards of the present iw^*" J vi, TZStasy like The Thief of Bagdad. day> 4ich are, after all, the best when Best P,ctures of A11 Tlme ' Some of the critics have had the kind- considering a form of art that .strives to The Birth of a Nation 63 ness to put the question to their readers, perfect itself from month to month." The Covered Wagon 60 as, for example, Miss Tena M. Jordan of Mr. Ortega's list includes A Woman of The Thief of Bagdad 54 the Portland, Maine, Press-Herald. Miss Paris, The Miracle Man. Broken Bios- Broken Blossoms 50 Jordan and her readers have agreed to soms, Tol'able David and The Kid. While The Ten Commandments 46 send in the following list, as the five great- everybody must consider that these five The Hunchback of Notre Dame .. . 46 est pictures : pictures were all great, many will promptly The Miracle Man 45 Abraham Lincoln think of many other great pictures just Peter Pan 43 The Ten Commandments (prolog) as Sreat as some of these perhaps. _ Hence, A Woman of Paris 40 Peter Pan ]t ,s a great puzzle that we have given the 1 he tour Horsemen jy The Iron Horse critics. Robin Hood 38 Secrets -^ iss ^aDel Steele of the Pittsburgh Abraham Lincoln 37 Sun has not forgotten Neptune's Daugh- Scaramouehe 35 Miss Alice Carroll of the Xew York ler, with .Annette Kellerman, which the Intolerance 33 Review declines to name "the five great- Fox Company produced in Bermuda many ToVablc David 33 est," but prefers to name "five of the years ago, and she gives it fifth place in Passion 31 (T greatest," and she chooses The Thief of her list. Neither has she forgotten Civili- Orphans of the Storm 31 p 12 1A0£
  13. 13. The Sea Hawk 31 The White Sister 30 Humoresque 30 He Who Gets Slapped 30 America 30 The Lost World 30 Secrets 30 When Knighthood Was in Flozvcr. 28 Janice Meredith 27 Way Down East 26 It must be remembered that some of these critics have not seen some of the great pictures lately produced, and it is quite possible that they have not even seen 6ome of the great old pictures. The comments on the greatest pictures ji the last six months tell quite a different story. Up to the present moment of going to press, the vote stands as follows : Advertising Section The Sea Hawk 64 Peter Pan 58 He Who Gets Slapped.. 54 The Thief of Bagdad 53 Monsieur Beaucairc. 51 Secrets 50 Forbidden Paradise 49 Abraham Lincoln.. 49 Beau Brummell 47 America 45 There were about one hundred different pictures voted for under the head of The Greatest Pictures of the Last Six Months, but in this issue we are giving only the leaders. In our next article, not only will we give the final vote of the critics, but the consensus of opinion of the editors and reviewers of the Brewster Publications. The Bulletin-Board (Continued from page 5) Talker. Edmund Burns was to have been loaned to D. W. Griffith to play the lead in Poppy but at the last moment Mr. DeMille found he could not be spared and wired his regrets to Mr. Griffith. Earl Hudson, who produced The Lost World, says that the hardest living thing to direct is a one-inch beetle. It took a day and a half in actual time to induce the beetle to crawl from Lewis Stone's arm onto his plate of beans. Wally Reid's scenario writer, Byron Morgan, is now writing for Richard Dix. California or Bust is Mr. Dix's new pic- ture, and Esther Ralston is making her debut as a leading woman with him, under the direction of Frank Tuttle. Rod La Rocque, who plays the lead in Bebe Daniel's picture, The Wild, Wild Girl, says it is full of the rost hair-raising episodes in the world. He is now being starred under the direction of Paul Sloan. On his way back to Xew York, after a visit to Cuba, Richard Bar- thelmess was the guest of the United States Navy. It was the first time ill the history of the modern navy that an actor has been its guest. Satan in Sables is the title of Lowell Sher- man's first picture for Warner Brothers. Lillian Rich and Bert Lytell are playing the leads in The Ship of Souls, Emerson Hough's last novel. John Barrymore, who has made a record- breaking success in London on the legiti- mate stage, has signed a contract with War- ner Brothers to appear in a series of productions. Work on his first picture for them has just started. When Constance and Norma were in the East they bought about a car-load of toys for the Keaton children. Buster wasn't very enthusiastic about it because the toys were of such a complicated and mechanical nature that he was the only one in the family who could "make them go." "They are all broken now,'' he says quietly. Gloria Swanson was the guest of honor at an enormous dinner dance given by Famous Players at the Park Lane in New York. Herbert Brenon is now busy with the business of directing "The Street of Forgotten Men," featuring Percy Marmont and Mary Brian Milton Sills is scheduled to begin work soon on Men of Steel, with Doris Kenyon as his leading lady. Elsie Ferguson is starring in The Un- known Lover under the direction of Vic- tor Hugo Halperin. Elmer Clifton had quite an argument with Mother Nature in New Zealand. He wanted a photograph of a volcano in action, and in spite of warnings from the natives, he got so close to Mt. Tongarro that, when he stuck the tripod of the camera in the ground, the earth registered protest in a burst of steam and a snake- like hissing. F. W. Mumau, the young director of the German picture, The Last Laugh, has signed a contract with William Fox which will bring him to this country early next year to start producing American pictures. Sophistication and the primitive emotions are to be combined in the near future. Michael Arlen, author of The Green Hat, is writing scenarios for Pola Negri. The Viennese Med- ley has undergone a change in cast. Doris Kenyon was scheduled to play the lead, but the part has now been assigned to May Alli- son. Doris is back at work after her illness, on The Half-Way Girl. Speaking of promis- ing newcomers, what about Dorothy Brock? She has played in ten pictures during the last year. Her latest work is with Conway Tearle, in Just a Woman. P. S. —She has just passed her fourth birthday. Alice Terry, who has gone abroad for a vacation with her husband, Rex Ingram, broke all the records at a quiet departure. She sailed at one o'clock in the morning and, for probably the first time in history, a movie star left the country without being either photographed or interviewed at the dock. The new picture starring Corinne Grif- fith has at last been definitely named. It started production under the title of The National Anthem, which was changed, while they were finishing the picture, to Modern Madness. Neither name "took," however, and it was finally released as The Marriage Waltz. Do You Want to Write Stories and Photoplays? IN EVERY section of the country, in crowded cities and on isolated farms, there are men and women who long to write for the magazines and the motion pictures, and yet do not know just how to begin. They have the precious gift of imagina- tion and the latent ability to write that are conferred as a priceless heritage upon a fortunate few. They see things that other people do not see. They dream dreams that other people do not dream. Are you the "One in a Hundred"? If you are one of these fortunate men or women who has the urge to write —if you have been longing for years for some way to learn how to make your stories sell we have a message for you today that will be the means of changing your entire life. It is simply that there is a way for you to master the technique of story telling and photoplay writing, right at home in spare time through the Palmer Institute of Authorship. Let us tell you if you can succeed as a writer The Palmer Institute of Authorship was founded seven years ago to co-operate with motion picture producers and magazine edi- tors in the development of new writers. The Palmer Institute holds a unique place among educational institutions because it enrolls only those who can pass its Creative Test and who show that they can profit by its instruction. We believe that a certain amount of natural talent is necessary to succeed as a writer and we do not wish to encourage anyone to take up writing as a profession unless they have that ability. What we seek, above all else, is the one man or one woman in a hundred who has a way with words, the precious gift of a creative imagination or the knack of in- venting incidents and who needs only train- ing in the technique of writing to win large success. To such men and women we offer unusual opportunities in the motion picture and magazine field. Send for the Palmer Creative Test If you believe that you have the natural ability to succeed as a writer, you are cordially invited to send for the Palmer Creative Test, fill it out and return it to us for analysis. Our Board of Examiners will study your reply and send you a frank report on your indicated abilities. There is no charge for this service and you incur no obligation. It is simply an expression of the sincerity of our search for new writers. Mail this Coupon Palmer Institute of Authorship Affiliated with Palmer Photoplay Corporation Dept. 9-T, Palmer Bldg. Hollywood, Calif. Please send me, without cost or obligation, a copy of your Creative Test and information about the subject which I have checked below Short Story Writing Photoplay Writing D English Expression Name Address.. When you write to advertisers please mention MOTION PICTCBF, All correspondence strictly confidential MAGAZINE. 13 i
  14. 14. f "MOTION PICTUFf V I MAGAZINE 1- Advertising Section WILLIAM FOX PRESENTS IN SEPTEMBER! 9^5 Gjtsxejreats for (picture "Patrons I IRON HORSE GEORGE O'BRIEN ~~ YOUNG HERO OF "THE IRON HORSE" A TENSE MOMENT in THE IRON HQE£E| THE PARTING SCENE BETWEEN MADGE BELLAMY 6, GEORGE O'BRIEN ] •4SE AS NO MAN HAS LOVEDA soul-stirring spectacle based on EDWARD EVERETT HALE'S "The Man Without a Country" . • A record-breaker at the Central Theatre, New York . ^A ROWLAND V. LEE Troduclion PAULINE STARKE WHO PLAYS ANNE BISSELL in "AS NO MAN HAS LOVED £^ EDMUND LOWE BRENDA BOND W Zn RAY BLOOMER n a scene ftomTHE FOOL EDMDND LOWE THE FOOL One year in New York with a Superb Cast of Leading Players and a Regiment of United States Troops and Cavalry; 3,000 Railway Workmen; 1,000 Chinese Laborers; 800 Pawnee, Sioux and Cheyenne Indians; 2,800 Horses; 1,300 Buffaloes; 10,000 Texas Steers. ^A JOHN FORD Troduclion The Picture that succeeded in spite of the Devi/! Based on Channing Pollock's great play THE FOOLAnother New York hit that has swept the Nation, setting new high marks for its entertainment powers. o* HARRY MILLARDE Troduclion l FOX FILM CORPORATION14 Every advertisement in MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE is guaranteed.
  15. 15. Cover Design Gloria Swanson as Madame Sans-Gene, a painting by M. Paddock from the photograph by Manuel Freres Cover The Bulletin Board Last-minute news about Pictures and Players and Studios 5 A Guide to 150 Current Pictures Alphabetted by title and briefly criticized for you 6-7 Clippings from the Motion Picture Magazine of June, 1915——To refresh your memory 8 The Greatest Pictures Ever Produced ——The opinions of a number of America's leading critics 12-13 Should the Stars Keep Young? A provocative editorial by Eugene V. Brewster 17 Our Portrait Gallery——New and exclusive studies of Lew Cody, May McAvoy, Neil Hamilton, Georgia Hale, Gertrude Olmstead, Charles Delaney, Jack Pickford, and June Marlowe 19-27 Should You Marry Your Opposite ? Statements from a number of screen stars, both men and women. 28-31 S-s-s-sh! People Say An enlightening article about the effect of rumors, .by Dorothy Donnell Calhoun 32-33 The Changing Glory of Gloria——Harry Carr reviews five chapters in the life oiGloiia Swanson 34-35 Do Animals Have Genius?——Astounding revelation about animal screen stars by Harry Carr 36-37 Young Love Picture Pages for Old Maids, Bachelors, and Middle-aged Married Folks only 38-39 My Life Story The autobiography of one of the earliest stars in the Film Firmament, by Anita Stewart 40-42 Glenn Hunter A study of this young actor made for you in his own library 43 Confidences Off-Screen With Dorothy Gish, Rod La Rocque, Carmel Myers by W. Adolphe Roberts 44-45 The Silken Gowns of a Siren Sketches of the gowns worn by Barbara La Marr in her new picture and photographs of the beautiful Barbara wearing them 46-47 The Charmer A fictionization of Pola Negri's intriguing new screen drama by Neil Moran 48-50 A Flapper from China-——A new character study of the ever-fascinating Irene Rich 51 Friendship—Love—Marriage A discussion, including impressions of the many women stars with whom he has appeared on the screen by Eugene O'Brien 52-53 Greta Nissen A dancer from Norway, who is now an American film favorite, posed for you 54 Clive Brook An Englishman, who is rapidly gaining fame on the American screen 55 The Right Weigh Ten stars tell you how they make the scales behave 56-57 Louise Fazenda She poses specially for you in the role of siren 58 That's Out Keen comment by a recognized master of satire and humor by Tamar Lane 59 Reeling With Laughter A few amusing scenes from comedies recently released 60-61 Pictures That I Would Like to See Again ——Applying the acid test by Eugene V. Brewster 62-63 "I'll Be a Kid Brother to You" A special photograph of Marion Nixon 64 New Pictures in Brief Review Criticisms of twenty-four new features by Laurence Reid 65-68 The Perfect Role for Doris Miss Kenyon and Frankie Lee in a scene from her new picture 69 Facts That I Can Read in the Faces of the Film Stars Character analyses of Ramon Novarro, Aileen Pringle, Viola Dana, and James Kirkwood by F. Vance de Revere 70-71 Seeing Stars! Pencil portraits and caricatures of the players, made by children 72 On the Camera Coast Harry Carr's department of Western studio gossip and news 73-75 A Romantic Young Star Takes the Gypsy Trail to Fame A study of Conrad Nagel as he appears with Rente Adoree in The Exquisite Sinner 76 Whose Hand? The concluding instalment of W. Adolphe Roberts' serial, in which the mystery is cleared, and the tangled threads ot the plot are unraveled 77-79 We're Asking You A question-box conducted for our readers by the. Editorial Staff 80 "The Top av the Mornin' to Yez" A greeting from Sally O'Neill, Marshall Neilan's screen discovery . . 81 Cheers and Hisses Excerpts from letters that have been sent to us by our readers 82 The Answer Man Replies to fans who have asked for information about pictures and stars 84 What the Stars Are Doing——The present activities of the players by Gertrude Driscoll 92
  16. 16. «frK!^R E Advertising Section Mellin's Food ! 16 AG£. Use the Mellin's Food Method of Milk Modification for your baby. It has raised thousands of the brightest and healthiest babies in the world. Write to us for a copy of our book, ff The Care and Feeding of Infants", also a Free Trial Bottle of Mellin's Food. Mellin's Food Co., 177 State St., Boston, Mass. Every advertisement in MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE is guaranteed.
  17. 17. WR30'2S ©C1B656904 ts Vol. XXIX Motion Picture Magazine Founded by J. Stuart Blackton in 1910—Trademark Registered JUNE, 1925 / / / / Number 5 Harry Carr, Western Editorial Representative R M' 0sborne> Editor A M Hopfmuller5 An Director Must the Players Keep Young? From the painting by Benjamin Eggleston Eugene V. Breivster, Editor-in-Chief of the Brewster Publications ONE of the large producers recently said to me that the picture life of a star was, on the average, about five years. He said that a girl is usually at her best at eighteen, and at twenty- five she was either fat and flabby, or wrinkled or married ; and as for a man, he ceased to be interesting to the public after he had passed twenty-five. I take exception to this attitude. The gentleman is in error. In the first place, we must consider types. There is the beautiful young girl type, still in her teens. She need not be tall or thin, or fat, or even beautiful, so long as she is interesting and can play the part. She must, however, have that indefinable something called charm or personality. It is a mistake to ask Gloria Swansnn to play such a part, or Norma Talmadge, or Pola Negri, etc. Yet the present star system demands that practically all players shall often play Sweet Sixteen. Many plays are written calling for a girl in her teens who grows tip into a woman in her twenties or thirties, but it is a mis- take to cast our present stars in such parts. Ben Lyon and Charles Ray can play a schoolboy, but Rudolph Valentino and Thomas Meighan cannot. While Mary Pickford is perennially young, she is an exception. Colleen Moore, in So Big, very successfully played a young girl who grew into a middle-aged woman, but only a few of our stars can do this. The stars are usually under contract at heavy salaries, and the producers must keep them busy. Plays that just suit them are hard to find, and so the stars are often asked to play parts that do not fit them at all. The producers seem to think that because a star was once eighteen and beautiful that she must always be so—that when she ceases to look youthful her usefulness is over. What a mistake ! Norma Talmadge is an artist. When she can no longer look twenty-five, is there any reason why she cannot play parts that call for a woman in her thirties? And when she can no longer look thirty, why should she not play still older parts? Sarah Bernhardt at seventy An Editorial by was just as much beloved as Sarah Bernhardt at thirty. So was Henry Irving. In other words, screen acting is an art, and beauty of face and form is not a necessary part. Let us not consider the children and the school girls and boys who fall in love with youth and beauty—they are only a small part of the aggregate picture public. Let them have their favorites of their own age, but teach them that even Mary Pickford cannot always play girl parts, and that she is still to be idolized even when she is forced to play an old lady. It is the acting, the charm, the personality that count—not youth and beauty only. And as for marriage, is America's Sweetheart any the less popular since she became Mrs. Fairbanks, or Norma Talmadge since she became Mrs. Schenck? Girls and boys do not admire youth and beauty merely because they want it for themselves—they rarely think of marrying any of the artists they see upon the screen. And as for those who say : "Oh, I dont like so-and-so any more she getting too matronly"—away with all such ! Because a star is married is nothing against him or her—quite the contrary. Marriage is the natural and proper thing, and it should be encouraged rather than discouraged. And so, when a producer tells me that the life of a picture star is only five years —'tis to laugh. He can see no farther than the end of his nose. He is influenced too much by what are called "mash notes," and he believes that when a star ceases to get romantic letters from love- sick boys and girls it is time to get a new star. Popularity is not enduring if it is based only on sex attraction or even on beauty, altho a man or woman can be just as beautiful at forty or fifty as at twenty, and just as attractive. Of course, all persons, both young and old, admire youth and beauty, and we cant see too much of it ; but let us all remember that there are other things in this world far more important, uplifting and inspiring. Let us train our eyes to look for them and to recognize them when we see them. 17 PAflP
  18. 18. f "MOTION PICTURF 01 I MAGAZINE L Advertlsing Section To FREE YOUR SKIN FROM BLEMISHES — USe the famous Woodbury treatment given below c-a debutante ball in Washington, D. C. Among Washington and Baltimore debu- tantes Woodbury's is six times as popular as any other soap Sixty TWO percent of Washington and Baltimore Debutantes find this soap the hest for their skin LAST month we published a report on 224 New J York and Boston debutantes, showing the very large extent to which Woodbury's Facial Soap is preferred above all other toilet soaps by these two groups of young society girls. In order to make our survey more complete, we followed our New York and Boston investigations with a similar inquiry among Washington and Baltimore debutantes. The results are fully as interesting as those of our previous investigation. Woodbury's six times as popular as any other soap Among the entire number of Washington and Baltimore debutantes presented this season, 62 per cent were regular users of Woodbury's Facial Soap. The Woodbury users numbered six times as many as the users of any other soap. Among Baltimore debutantes alone, Woodbury's was nearly eight times as popular as any other soap. There are more than 500 different brands of toilet soap on the market today. The Famous Woodbury Treatme7it for "Bletnishes JUST before retiring, wash in your usual way with warm water and Woodbury's Facial Soap and then dry your face. Now dip the tips of your fingers in warm water and rub them on the cake of Woodbury's until they are covered with a heavy cream-like lather. Cvver each blemish with a thick coat of this soap cream and leave it on for ten min- utes. Then rinse very carefully with clear hot water, then with cold. W'H.'Cthury's *2fj°iSoQP Why is it that, with this bewildering assortment to choose from, the majority of society debutantes in New York, Boston, Washington, and Baltimore are over- whelmingly in favor of Woodbury's Facial Soap? Why these society girls use Woodbury's Facial Soap The answer is two-fold: —because with a society girl the care of her skin is a matter of primary importance; and because of the wonderful efficacy of Woodbury's Facial Soap and the famous Woodbury treatments in helping women to overcome common skin defects, and to keep their complexion smooth, clear and flawless. Around each cake of Woodbury's Facial Soap is wrap- ped a booklet containing special treatments for each type of skin. Get a cake of Woodbury's today, at any drug store or toilet goods counter and begin the treatment your skin needs! A 25-cent cake of Woodbury's lasts a month or six weeks for regular toilet use, including any of the special treatments. For convenience — get Woodbury's in 3- or 12-cake boxes. /^J^REE OFFER!—Send today for the free guest-size set of _^ y/ three famous Woodbury skin preparations with new +_S large-site trial cake of ll'oodbury's Facial Soap. The Andrew Je^n^;cin. ci nnati, Ohio 13 o6 Spr.ng Grove a t. slM set com Please send roe ^.^alcakeofWoodba^ If you live in L»n shtrbrooke St., re Co., Limited, 13" Name- Address. Cut out this coupon anj mail it today I Copyright, 1925, by The Andrew Jergens Co. 18 GE Every advertisement in MOTION PICTURE MAGAZINE is guaranteed.
  19. 19. ^^^^fc- ^" OUQ PORTMTGPiLlIR)' Lew Cody Lew is one of the screen's best bad men. In fact, a good many of us have caught ourselves wishing him luck even in his villainy. Now we'll have a chance to come right out and lose our hearts openly, for, in Elinor Glyn's "Man and Maid," he plays the hero we've always known he really is
  20. 20. May McAvoy So far as May is concerned, we vote 50-50 on this blonde-and- brunette question. She's just as enchantingly lovely as the pale-gold Esther, adored by Ramon Novnrro in "Ben Hur," as she is in the portrait above where she's croivned with her own fluffy dark hair
  21. 21. William Putter Neil Hamilton He is another Griffith discovery, and consequently is well worth watching. His work in "Isn't Life Wonderful?" was superb. Now he's portraying Giles Bradley in "The Little French Girl." At the left we reproduce a scene from "Men and Women," in which he played opposite Claire Adams
  22. 22. Henry Waxman Georgia Hale She won her right to stardom by her work in "The Salvation Hunters." As soon as that picture was finished, Charles Chaplin signed her as his leading lady in "The Gold Rush," which, according to the latest re- ports, will be released early this summer
  23. 23. Gertrude Olmstead She's playing opposite Rudolph Valentino in "Cobra." Its a vamping role, and she wears a blonde wig—but why, oh, why?- Isn't she far more alluring as her brunette self in the portrait above, than as the blonde at the right? Clarence S. Bull
  24. 24. Charles Delaney It's hard to believe that the smiling boy in the picture above could be one of the inmates in "The Mansion of Aching Hearts," but at the right, with Barbara Bedford and Priscilla Bonner, he proves that he is well qualified to play a heart-aching role. Do you re- member him as Arthur, the young brother of Barbara Frietchie?
  25. 25. June Marlowe Rin Tin Tin is a sure enough lucky dog to be starred with such an attractive girl as June. Their latest picture is "Below the Line," and is as full of thrills and beauty and romance as its forerunner, "Tracked in the Snow Country"
  26. 26. I Mr. and Mrs. James Cruze (Betty Compson) Betty Compson Answers: YES—and no ! I think married people should be alike in their chief interests, but there must be some dissimilarity, or their lives will be lopsided. It would be rather sad for an outdoor-loving girl to be married to a man who cared only for a book before the fire, but they might both love outdoors and one be a golf enthusiast and the other dote on tennis, and yet each get a lot of joy out of the other's game. They shouldn't be radically different. I dont think it's pos- sible to understand someone who doesn't touch you on any point. And how can a man appreciate your ideas and point of view if you are al- ways arguing from opposite poles ? The other person ought to be able to open doors for you that you didn't even know were there, if you are going to keep on being interested ; 28 0E Should You Marr^ Fourteen formulas ft from heroes and leadin happiest homes in th and you should have a few new trails to guide him ov< yourself ! Says Harold Lloyd: T married my opposite ! -* If people can ever learn from someone else's e. perience, they might learn from me to go and do likewis I think it is the best insurance against marital boredon because the mind of the opposite type isn't a wel known trail, and exploring it is in the nature of a ne adventure. Mrs. Lloyd is fair and I am dark and we're well suite Gene Kornraan Harold Lloyd and his happy family to one another, we think. But whether the color of our hair and the relative textures of our skins have anything to do with our being pleased with our bargain, I'm not prepared to say. At any rate, I wouldn't go so far as to forbid a red-headed man to marry a red-haired girl because they weren't opposites ! Opposite temperaments make good matrimonial risks, according to my ideas, because the danger of dulness is lessened. When lovers begin to yawn in each other's com- pany, it's a bad sign Cupid, the underwriter, had better look out !
  27. 27. Your Opposite? successful married life ladies of some of the motion picture world Keeping the other half of the partnership interested is always a good idea. But nobody wants to make a con- tinual circus of himself to do that. Being an opposite does it for you And Mildred Davis Lloyd: Y/es, I believe" you will have a greater chance of happi- * ness if you marry your opposite. 1 haven't tried doing anything else, of course Harold is rather quiet and 1 am told I am "lively." I dont know what we'd do if he were "lively," too There should be one who chatters and one who listens, International Newsreel Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Valentino posite. you will be sure of getting another view-point on almost every subject under the sun. Which is an inducement! I Mr. and Mrs. Adolphe Menjou The McGregor family one who is gay and one who is amused, a butterfly and a bee. Imagine two people who thought the same things, did the same things, wanted the same things, in the same wa—oh, horrors ! I think it's necessary to have a practical member in the firm. It's such a comfort, too, to know that there's somebody whose good sense you can rely on to keep you from disaster in following the will-o'-the-wisps — which is one of the things vola- tile people are always doing. If you marry your op- Elmo Boyce Rudolph Valentino Declares: do not profess to be an authority on the subject, but since you have asked me, I will answer that I think a man should marry his ideal, whether she be an opposite or not. Truly, he should not wed a woman who does not inspire his imagination and his idealism. The answer would seem to be obviously the only one possible, but there is another side to the question. That brilliant Ameri- can writer, James Branch Cabell, tells us that love should have something of the unat- tainable in it. In Figures of Earth, he quotes a wizard as say- ing: Love, as I think, is an instant's fusing of shadow and substance. They that asfire to pos- sess love utterly fall into folly. This is forbid- den; you cannot. The lover, beholding 29 PAfit
  28. 28. (T«!SR E At the left you'll find Ruth Clifford Cor- nelius and her hus- band. Ruth says she doesn't know whether she married her op- posite or not, but she does know that they are ideally happy At the right, meet Wallace MacDonald and his wife, Doris May. Mr. says that opposites always win, but Mrs. votes 50-50 Freulich that fusing move as a goldcn-hued goddess, accessible, kindly and priceless, woos and ill-fatedly wins all the substance. The golden-hued shadow dims in the dawn of his married life, dulled with content, and the shadow vanishes. So there remains, for the puzzled husband's embracing, flesh which is fair and dear, no doubt, yet is flesh such as his; and talking and talking and talking; and kisses in all ways desirable. Love, of a sort, too, remains, but hardly the love that was yesterday's. ... This is the cry of all husbands that now are or may be hereafter: "What has become of the girl that I married? And how should f rightly deal with this woman whom some- how time has involved in my doings? Love, of a sort, now, I have for her, but not the love that was yesterday's." Mr. Cabell has uncanny powers of penetration into the human heart and he has a disturbing way of telling us the truth about his findings. Yet there are many of us who have not found the possession of f^* * love to be such an antidote for love. Even in this age and frequent divorce, there are thousands of men and women who have found joy in their marriages and whose love has grown with the years. There is a quality in real love that is not so easily tarnished by con- tact. But, if the beautiful shadow has a tendency to grow dim with the possession of the substance, it is all the more reason why a man should marry his ideal, what- ever she may be. The goddess will re- main golden-hued the longer. In truth, there is always the chance that she will not lose her radiance at all. ! I to 30 Gt Says Malcolm McGregor: dont know about handing out advice anybody who is Anna Q. Nilsson and her hu band John Gun- n er s o n have many interests and ideals in common and are among H oil y wood's happiest couples hovering on the brink of matrimony and hasn't made up his mind whether to jump into a lake or a bathtub—but I can set down my own experience. I married my opposite—most decidedly so ! And I'm still glad that I did. Our daughter has reached the advanced age of seven years, and the venture is still far from the rocks. Mrs. McGregor likes to go out, loves to dance, enjoys theaters and concerts and all that. I am content to stay home. Perhaps that sounds far from harmonious, but the fact is that it's amusing. If we both wanted to stay home, no doubt we'd soon get duller than ditch-water in a dry spell. If we were both keen about dashing out every night, we'd probably be nervous wrecks. As it is, we get just enough of each kind of thing. Having someone of opposite temperament in the house with you is interesting. Any subject you bring up will be sure to be looked upon in a light you'd never have thought of yourself. However, I suppose I'd better add that you must be sure to select someone with a sense of humor and a lot of tolerance, if you're go- ^ ing to marry your opposite! Otherwise, things mightn't work out so well. And Adolphe Menjou : Altho mar- -**- r y ing a person who is one's opposite in habit, tem- perament and com plexion, does not nec- essarily insure matrimonial tranquillity, it will go a long way toward furthering that very desirable relationship. The placid type of person will check the impulsive be- havior of the temperamental (Continued on page 104)
  29. 29. Henry Waxraan Mr. and Mrs. Jack Dempsey Naturally, the last word on the subject of marrying opposites should be given to Estelle Taylor and Jack Dempsey—who are the last newly-weds on the Mr.-and-Mrs. roster in Hollywood- fiSTELLE says: "No. Try to find someone with the same likes and dislikes as your own, if you're looking for happiness. Naturally, a woman may like to sew and a man may enjoy fighting, but if they have the same tastes in regard to living, they'll get along well. You cant expect to agree on every least little point, but you shouldn't have wide differences in taste to bridge over. Of course, if two people love each other very, very much, it may be that they can learn to like the same things. You're really surprised to see how much of the color of someone else's personality you can take on and how much of your own is reflected in him!" TACK says: "I dont think it makes a great deal of difference whether you marry your opposite or not. You can be happy, regardless! It would seem to me, tho, that .the chances for happiness would be greatly in- creased if you married someone who was in sympathy with you. You could understand each other so much better than if your mental processes were a mystery. I am not talking about physical opposites. I cant see how size and coloring and beauty can have anything to do with the subject—but about temperament. I say, marry someone who is temperamentally in accord with you. Still, as I've said before, it doesn't really matter!" 3.P
  30. 30. "S-s-s-sh! People Say 99 Every time Eric von Stroheim be- gins to di- rect a picture, the rumor spreads that he is going to be di $ missed! How are the picture people to combat the malicious and un- truthful rumors that are constantly circu- lated about them ? After you read this article you'll think twice before you be- lieve a scandalous report about a player Says Dorothy Donnell Calhoun o ! noisy little birdie that tells peo pie things, but when you attempt to catch it by putting a grain of salt on its "tale," so tc speak, it flits away out of reach. In all the world—with the possi- ble exception of Wash- ington, D. C.—there is no spot so fertile for rumors as this little town nestled against the foothills, eight miles out of Los An- geles. The usual formula of greeting between two friends on the Boulevard is : "Well, what's the dirt?" Con- versation over the luncheon table begins : "Did you hear the latest?" or "I've got the low-down," or "S-s-s-sh ! People say " In shops, kitchens, beauty parlors, studios, clubs, there are circu- lated facts and fiction, conjecture, lies. The wildest stories are al- ways prefaced by an authoritative "I know for a fact that 32 NE of the commonest birds in Hollywood trees is that Alexander The most en- gaged and about- to be-married girl in all Filmdom, according to Dame Rumor, is Constance TaV madgeEven the truth, by the time it is passed thru a dozen tellings, is dis- torted, like the old game of "Gossip," in which a sentence whispered by each player in his neighbor's ear reaches the end of the line entirely changed. THhere is a certain A class of person (to which most of us be- long ! ) who likes to pose as being intimate- ly acquainted with ce- lebrities. At a lunch- eon party not long ago the wife of a famous leading man. who had been introduced sim- ply as "Mrs. So-and- so." was amazed to listen to fantastic gos- sip about her husband which she knew could not possibly he true. But she held her peace until one of the women coyly hinted at a flir- tation with the fasci- nating screen idol, and named as the place where she had met him a dinner given when International Xewsreel Every year, without fail, comes the report that Douglas and Mary have quarreled over his lead- ing woman, and have separated

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