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A Baker from Goa | PPT | English | Seminar | Class 10 | Studious Wiz

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A Baker from Goa | PPT | English | Seminar | Class 10 | Studious Wiz

  1. 1. A Baker From Goa -Lucio Rodrigues
  2. 2. About The Author ▪ Professor Lucio Rodrigues is another one in a long line of literary geniuses that Goa has produced. He may have long departed this world but nevertheless his legacy of literature lives on through his writing and his students. An authority on Goan folklore, Prof Lucio Rodrigues was not only a visiting professor of folklore at the Indiana University, USA in 1969; his essays in English, as well as those translated from Konkani, were published as Of Soil and Soul and Konkani Folktales after his death in 1973. It was the revised edition of this compilation, renamed Ambolim, which was released at the commemoration of this exceptional son of Goa’s birth centenary (15th April, 2015) at the Xavier Centre of Historical Research, Porvorim.
  3. 3. Paragraph-1… • The story takes us back to the time when Goa was ruled by the Portuguese. They were very famous for their breads. • They think about the past and tell them that though the Portuguese have left Goa but the bakers of bread still exist, if not the original ones, their legacy is still being continued by their sons. • The bakers are still being referred to as ‘Paders’. Pader means baker in Portuguese. This reference shows how much of an impact the Portuguese had in their lives. • Everything about baking is still the same; ranging from those who mould the bread loaves, to the furnaces which have survived the ruins of time. The sound of their arrival and the thud of their bamboo stick can still be heard just like the olden times.
  4. 4. Paragraph-2 • The narrator remembers that the baker used to be their friend and companion during their childhood in Goa. He used to visit them twice a day, in the morning on his selling round and in then again when he came back with his empty basket. • The thud from his bamboo was like an alarm for them and they ran to meet up and greet him. It wasn’t for the love of the loaf, as they were bought by the maid or the servant of the house. Instead it was for those bread bangles he made for them.
  5. 5. Paragraph-3 • The baker used to make his entry with a loud sound made by his specially made bamboo staff. • He would then greet the lady of the house, and place the basket on the ground. • The children would be waiting for their bread, but they would be pushed away and then baker used to hand the loaves over to the servant. • The children would excitedly peep into the basket climbing on top of a bench or a parapet. • The children used to get bangles and the elders used to get the loaves.
  6. 6. Paragraph-4 • The author talks about how marriages and other functions are meaningless without the traditional Goan delicacy called bol which was made of sweet bread. • The authors also talks about how important Bakers are to a village. • The lady of a house should prepare sandwiches for her daughter's engagement. • Cakes and bolinhas were also important traditional delicacies during Christmas and other festivals.
  7. 7. Paragraph-5 • During the olden days in Goa, bakers wore a special dress called Kabai. • In the writer’s childhood; the bakers used to wear a shirt and trousers (less than the full-length pants) • Even today, if someone saw a person wearing that, they’d call him a “Pader!”
  8. 8. Paragraph-6 • Bakers collect money (bills) at the end of every month. • Baking was very profitable. • Baker’s family are always happy and prosperous. • They seemed to be in plump physique.
  9. 9. Thank You For Listening!! *Presentation Made By Studious WiZ

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