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  1. 1. Ex Mex
  2. 2. The Humanitarian Costs of the Immigration Debate <ul><li>As the immigration debate grows increasingly polarized, people tend to talk past each other, forgetting the humanitarian costs, who focused on the human side of the issue. Mexicans residing near Tampa are departing in record numbers. In the past year, the Florida legislature has proposed six restrictive bills pertaining to migrants or immigrations. One law, permits public employs to pass information about their colleagues to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency. Noted that undocumented immigrants constitute the fastest-growing prison population across the United States. Such practices drive immigrants underground. </li></ul>
  3. 3. U.S. Elections and the Future of Immigration Reform <ul><li>Panelists voiced little hope for substantive change on U.S. immigration policy before the new U.S. president-elect takes office in 2009. Highlighting the political complexity and leadership risk on the issue, panelists noted that President George W. Bush won the 2004 U.S. presidential election with 49 percent of the Hispanic vote. Yet he failed to build the necessary national consensus to pass immigration reform in June 2007, despite leading bipartisan and White House support for the legislation. The US election stated that both Republican and Democratic candidates would have to answer the question of whether and how to provide a track to citizenship. However, the present debate is so expansive, varied, and pitched that developing a middle position remains a challenge, noted Sabatini. Still, as Castañeda suggests in his new book, building a political consensus is a necessary and key task for policy leaders. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Mexico’s Role in the U.S. Immigration Debate <ul><li>The issue of immigration policy in the United States requires a stronger and more clearly articulated position from the Mexican government, said Castañeda. There are two schools of thought about Mexico’s role, he suggested during the panel. The first, prevailing view that immigration is a U.S. domestic policy issue has begun encountering challenges, he said. The second view is that President Felipe Calderón should be more engaged in assisting Mexicans living abroad. Subscribing to the second school of thought, Castañeda said Calderón could expand consular services and diplomatically press the U.S. Government on the issue by treating immigration as a regional, as well as domestic, concern. Castañeda underscored the need for U.S.-Mexican cooperation on the matter by noting that, at several points during the past century, 10 percent of the Mexican population has resided in the United States. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Immigrant rights <ul><li>In support of immigrant rights in May 2006 there is one thing that has become clear, there is no domestic issue in the United States today that sparks as much public debate or is as politicized as immigration reform. The focus is all on the Mexican immigrants. Those illegal immigrants do not have the rights to come into the US but they still do for there own good to reform in the US. These debates occur to weather to or not strike down upon the,. All in all these immigrants had a purpose and the right to come in the country to make them selves from nothing to something and make the world a better place. The rights are important and should be different than the people that are living. That’s why we have the immigrant rights. </li></ul>

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