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The Power of Design Thinking to Build Connected Health Products People Love

Connected health products hold tremendous promise. But creating products people love goes beyond technology. In this hands-on workshop, we’ll demystify design thinking, the methodology being embraced by innovative startups and Fortune 500s, such as IBM, to sustain and extend their relevance in the new economy. By using three lenses — product strategy, product as a service, and behavioral change — we’ll explore how connected products can help to drive meaningful health and wellness outcomes. This workshop is relevant to those who want to uncover actionable data, as well as deliver products and services that make a meaningful impact on people’s lives.

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The Power of Design Thinking to Build Connected Health Products People Love

  1. 1. TO BUILD CONNECTED HEALTH 
 PRODUCTS PEOPLE LOVE Connected Health Conference 
 October 27, 2017 Shaun Gummere
 Vice President
 Service Design Conor Sheehan
 Principal Designer THE POWER OF DESIGN THINKING
  2. 2. AGENDA INTRO PRODUCT STRATEGY PRODUCT AS SERVICE BEHAVIOR CHANGE WRAP UP
  3. 3. A CONNECTED PRODUCT In simplest terms—the highest level of abstracJon—a connected product is a thing with connecJvity, it can sense, and it may be able to actuate.
  4. 4. IT’S COMPLICATED No longer a single transac@on Not a simple physical ar@fact Expresses a long-running service Generates data And, needs to fit into your life
  5. 5. EXPERIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY ARE TIGHTLY COUPLED
  6. 6. LET’S GET STARTED
  7. 7. CONNECTED INSULIN INJECTOR Auto injectors have been on market for a few years. They provide significant service to those with diabetes because they allow for automated injection, metering of amount, and systems can take action against issues via remote monitoring of the patient. By creating a smarter insulin injector we can: • monitor glucose levels in real time • report that info along with auto injection info to the physician • sync EMR & patient data in real time
  8. 8. LIST AS MANY PROBLEM AREAS AS YOU CAN THINK OF THE CHALLENGE 10 MIN
  9. 9. WHAT HAPPENS WHERE?
  10. 10. FUNCTIONALITY & UI INTERACTION MODEL: WHAT HAPPENS WHERE? What functionality does the product have? What does the device do and what does the app do? What’s the UI and does it live on the device, on the app, or both? What state is reflected where? 20 MIN
  11. 11. TRUTH IN A SYSTEM
  12. 12. CONTINUITY & LATENCY
 CONCEPTUAL MODEL: TRUTH IN THE SYSTEM Your device is functioning correctly, but data is interrupted. It no longer is transmitting in real time to the doctor/EMR. What should the user know? If this happens for 1 hour. What about 3 days? 10 MIN
  13. 13. PRODUCT AS SERVICE
  14. 14. SOME JUST KINDA “HAPPEN”
  15. 15. OTHERS ARE CAREFULLY DESIGNED
  16. 16. SERVICE DESIGN Experience between a person and a single touchpoint, usually a digital product Orchestrated experience between all parts of the service, from people, to places, to interfaces service designuser experience —Jamin Hegeman
  17. 17. patients service interactions constituents products processes & workflow systems & technologies structurepolicies culture patient experience clinician experience SERVICE DESIGN APPROACH
  18. 18. THE PATIENT JOURNEY SERVICE EXPERIENCE Where does the patient journey begin? What interactions does the patient have with caregivers, electronic messages, delivery by mail, etc? What’s the emotional cadence? 20 MIN
  19. 19. ASSUMPTIONS SERVICE EXPERIENCE Review your map and make note of all the assumptions made. What are they and how might you move from assumed to known? 5 MIN
  20. 20. BEHAVIOR
  21. 21. “ “The ultimate goal of a habit-forming product is to solve the user’s pain by creating an association so that the user identifies the company’s product or service as the source of relief. First, the company must identify the particular frustration or pain point in emotional terms, rather than product features. These common needs are timeless and universal. Yet talking to users to reveal these wants will likely prove ineffective because they themselves don’t know which emotions motivate them.” NIR EYAL
 HOOKED: HOW TO BUILD HABIT FORMING PRODUCTS
  22. 22. ABILITY: SIX FACTORS Time Money/Cost Physical Effort Cognitive Load Social Deviance Non-Routine
  23. 23. “ “There are many counterintuitive and surprising ways companies can boost users’ motivation or increase their ability by understanding heuristics—the mental shortcuts we take to make decisions and form opinions.” NIR EYAL
 HOOKED: HOW TO BUILD HABIT FORMING PRODUCTS “
  24. 24. MOTIVATION & ABILITY THE SCARCITY EFFECT
 In an experiment, one jar held ten cookies while the other contained just two. “Although the cookies and jars were identical, participants valued the ones in the near- empty jar more highly. The appearance of scarcity affected their perception of value.“ THE FRAMING EFFECT
 ”The mind takes shortcuts informed by our surroundings to make quick and sometimes erroneous judgments.” When a world class violinist performed his concert in the subway station, few stopped to listen. But when framed in the context of a concert hall, tickets would sell out in a few days at extremely high prices. THE ANCHORING EFFECT
 “People often anchor to one piece of information when making a decision.” If you see a product at 50% off, you may buy it even if it’s more expensive than the same product, which is not on sale. THE ENDOWED PROGRESS EFFECT
 “Two groups of customers were given punch cards awarding a free car wash once the cards were fully punched. One group was given a blank punch card with eight squares; the other was given a punch card with ten squares that came with two free punches. Both groups still had to purchase eight car washes to receive a free wash; however, the second group of customers — those that were given two free punches— had a staggering 82 percent higher completion rate.”
  25. 25. ABILITY BEHAVIOR How might you design your product so it incorporated an internal trigger? How might you influence user’s perceptions to adopt the right behavior? 10 MIN
  26. 26. WRAP UP Use design thinking to understand what people desire—build empathy and make to learn Recognize that connected products are a service—design for service Adoption isn’t enough—design for habits to drive behavioral change over time Build your product strategy up from these insights—manage complexity.
  27. 27. THANKS! Shaun Gummere
 Vice President
 Service Design Conor Sheehan
 Principal Designer 320 Congress Street | Boston, MA 02210 www.cantina.co

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