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2017 new media

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2017 new media

  1. 1. ONLINE AGE Changes in Audience Behaviour How has the creation of the web changed the way in which audiences behave and interact with media?
  2. 2. SOCIAL MEDIA –WEB 2.0 1. What is social media? 2. What forms of social media do you use? 3. What do you use them for? –list the different ways 4. Who else uses social media? 5. Why/How?
  3. 3. CLAY SHIRKY “Media is Global, Social, Ubiquitous and Cheap” Social Determinism
  4. 4. AUDIENCE ? Media has always had an audience, whether it be film, TV, newspapers, music… However, is it correct to address a ‘player’ of a video game as part of an audience? The term consumer might be more appropriate. Traditionally audiences were separate entities to producers. One produced the media and the other consumed it. Since the rise of the web there is an increasingly blurred distinction between the two, as consumers are also producing content and uploading it via the Internet. The result is a demographic of prosumers
  5. 5. BEFORE YOU TUBE
  6. 6. SOCIAL MEDIA –WEB 2.0 • New media landscape • Audience participation • Technological capital Social capital • Technological determinism Social determinism* The Internet has generated the largest increase in expressive media *audience interaction with media is now more social and this behaviour is having an impact in determining what new technologies are being developed
  7. 7. SOCIAL MEDIA MARK ZUCKERBERG PRONOUNCED AT 2010’S WEB 2.0 SUMMIT IN SAN FRANCISCO THAT, "OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS, MOST INDUSTRIES ARE GOING TO GET RETHOUGHT TO BE SOCIAL, AND DESIGNED AROUND PEOPLE.“ AS ZUCKERBERG SAYS, "HUMANS ARE HARDWIRED TO BE INTERESTED IN PEOPLE." How does Mark Zuckerberg’s quote relate to what Clay Shirky says?
  8. 8. HENRY JENKINS PARTICIPATORY CULTURE
  9. 9. ON-LINE TERMINOLOGY Not only have we experience the evolving of new technologies, since the introduction of the web, but also new terminology (producer & user lingo) How many of the following terms can you give clarity of meaning to?
  10. 10. ACTIVITY Numa numa http://www.newgrounds.com/portal/view/206373 Tay Zonday http://tayzonday.ning.com/ Memes http://www.freshnetworks.com/blog/2010/12/6-social-media-memes-of-2010/ Mashups http://videomashup.blogspot.com/ Pick one of the above and do a case study on a Googledoc Presentation Include: 1. What it is (definition) 2. When and how it began 3. What was the response 4. Examples of how it has developed (via the Web) 5. Future? –what do you predict could follow as a result? [extension]
  11. 11. AUDIENCE THEORY GRATIFICATIONS MODEL Blulmer and Katz (1974) A further study by Blulmer & Katz said that audience media consumption is based on choices so that an audience will seek out media that meets their desire / need /personal preference. i.e. They are perhaps seeking media that endorses their already established views and gratify a need/desire •Diversion (escapism) •Relationship (using e.g. soaps to replace family life) •Personal Identity (finding sense of understanding self) •Surveillance (seeking useful information) •
  12. 12. DAVID GAUNTLETT
  13. 13. ANDREW KEEN
  14. 14. SBTV Watch: SBTV Who is Jamal Edwards? Is he a professional? Is he trained, expert, earning a living How did SBTV start? SBTV – any up to date news / facts? Who made the video? What is the purpose of the video? consider google goldmine (The Virtual Revolution)
  15. 15. GAUNTLETT VS KEEN DEBATE David Gauntlett Andrew Keen prosumer culture UGC –greater creativity, prosumer culture, everyone can produce content. Social platforms that connect communities.. Rise of the citizen journalist Greater distribution and opportunity, not based on the traditional conglomerates. online democratic society cult of the amateur In today’s self broadcasting culture, amateurism is celebrated and anyone with an opinion can publish a blog or video. He who shouts loudest – with untrained ignorance rumours abound rather than carefully validated facts. no responsibility
  16. 16. EVGENY MOROZOV The Net Delusion cultural utopianism cyber idealism techo utopia or techno dystopia
  17. 17. CITIZEN JOURNALISM China earthquake London Riots Arab Springs US / UK election Consider how social media played a part in each of the above What are the advantages / disadvantages of citizen journalism?
  18. 18. CITIZEN JOURNALISM VS OFFICIAL NEWS Citizen Journalism Official News • immediate • accessible • impartial • not mediated • irrelevant • wider range of voices • more information • biased / unbiased (?) • professional voice • reliable • accurate • valid • relevant • factual • biased / unbiased (?)
  19. 19. FAKE NEWS What is fake news? How does it compare to your researched Citizen Journalism? In contrast to Citizen Journalism what advantages / disadvantages are there to fake news? Sir Tim Berners-Lee http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39246810 http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-37846860 https://www.buzzfeed.com/craigsilverman/viral-fake-election-news-outperformed-real-news-on- facebook?utm_term=.djNA57VMN#.sf6Rag21o http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsbeat/article/38827101/how-facebook-is-starting-to-tackle-fake-news-in-your-news-feed http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/blogs-trending-38769996
  20. 20. FAKE NEWS The man who set up fake news site Southend News Network told Newsbeat that two million people a month read his spoof articles. In the final three months of the US presidential campaign, the top- performing fake election news stories on Facebook generated more engagement than the top stories from major news outlets such as the New York Times, Washington Post, Huffington Post, NBC News 20 top-performing false election stories from hoax sites and hyperpartisan blogs generated 8,711,000 shares, reactions, and comments on Facebook.
  21. 21. EDWARD SNOWDEN Critical thinking matters – not censorship – is the answer to fake news
  22. 22. THE COST OF FREE WEB3.0 Analytics Algorithms Advertising
  23. 23. THE WEB NO WEB WEB 1.0 WEB 2.0 WEB 3.0 WEB 4.0 PAST PRESENT FUTURE limited communication methods the information web websites bulletin boards e.g. Pinterest The Web Evolution the social web social media e.g. Facebook, You Tube participatory culture prosumers personalised web no web tailor made search semantics e.g. Google AdWords intelligent web human & technology integration symbiotic e.g. Alexa
  24. 24. CASE STUDY EXAMPLES Life in A Day - 24th July 2010 (Ridley Scott) example 80,000 clips from 192 different countries Filmed for you Tube – free (DVD later)
  25. 25. CASE STUDY EXAMPLES Example of Participatory Culture* – Henry Jenkins theory Cross media platforms Presidential online Campaign – use of social media and interactive audience participation (mobile app) – sense of voice being heard example Enables people to experience different cultures they’d never able to do in the past- getting an insider’s view debate Voyeuristic society – entertaining ourselves by watching other people’s private lives (now public) Case study. Laughing Chewbacca Mask Lady (May 2016) – over 135 million views in a week - Most viewed Facebook Live Holly Willoughby and Philip Schofield wore the mask on ‘This Morning’
  26. 26. CASE STUDY EXAMPLES Viral memes were then spread of the mask – creating an engaged active audience around the world debate Clay Shirky –“Media is social, global, ubiquitous and cheap” supportive theory Discussion – viral videos, memes, blogs, social media, live video, collaboration* vloggers, crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Case study Technology since the online age has enabled participatory culture e.g. We recreated a ‘life in a day experience’. As a class we were each able to use our own mobile phones, camera, go-pros – we edited using fcpx on iMacs in the class. We could download sound from online websites to add to our film.
  27. 27. CASE STUDY EXAMPLES Viral memes were then spread of the mask – creating an engaged active audience around the world debate Clay Shirky –“Media is social, global, ubiquitous and cheap” supportive theory Discussion – viral videos, memes, blogs, social media, live video, collaboration* vloggers, crowdfunding, crowdsourcing, Case study Technology since the online age has enabled participatory culture e.g. We recreated a ‘life in a day experience’. As a class we were each able to use our own mobile phones, camera, go-pros – we edited using fcpx on iMacs in the class. We could download sound from online websites to add to our film.
  28. 28. CASE STUDY EXAMPLES David Gauntlett – Web 2.0 – ‘making is creating’ supportive argument- theory The Big Gods (Media Conglomerates) – the little people (consumer audience) – passive – becoming an interactive audience of –Prosumers - user generated content Gardens = collaboration – all contributing to content online* - You Tube Andrew Keen – cult of the Amateur –he who shouts loudest counter argument Idealised ideology of democratisation– hippies & techie geeks vs realism – making a difference Charlie bit my finger / cute cat videos etc. not making a difference to society (only entertainment) example Sir Tim Berners Lee – 1989 created the web (1991) link to the past Free – dream of levelling, (Aleks Krotoski ‘The Virtual Revolution’)
  29. 29. MAP OF ONLINE COMMUNITIES
  30. 30. WEB 2.0
  31. 31. U.G.C.
  32. 32. TAGGING
  33. 33. BLOGGING
  34. 34. VLOGGING
  35. 35. MEMES
  36. 36. OPEN SOURCE
  37. 37. VIRTUAL
  38. 38. MECASTING
  39. 39. GATEKEEPERS
  40. 40. CITIZEN JOURNALISM
  41. 41. BRANDS STRATEGY
  42. 42. GEO- TAGGING
  43. 43. SEMANTIC

Notas do Editor

  • https://youtu.be/HWDCeEJ9ZfI?list=PLFF31241E65BEFE8F
  • https://youtu.be/bhGBfuyN5gg
  • https://youtu.be/U2XzkpdR3dg?list=PLFF31241E65BEFE8F
  • https://youtu.be/U2XzkpdR3dg?list=PLFF31241E65BEFE8F
  • https://xkcd.com/802/

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