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M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E I N
Information and Knowledge Strategy
Use Cases for
Communities of Practice
Stan Garfield
A...
2
COLLABORATION
1. Communicate
2. Obtain
3. Locate
4. Learn
5. Assist
6. Build
7. Offer
8. Resolve
9. Ask
10. Transfer
11....
3
1. Communicate
• Inform the organization
about your activities.
plans, and progress
• Interact with colleagues
• Solicit...
4
2. Obtain
• Gain assistance from
others
• Find out what others are
doing
• Retrieve information
• Receive answers to
que...
5
3. Locate
• Locate subject matter
specialists
• Find documents, credentials,
references, sites, official
methods, lesson...
6
4. Learn
• Learn more about
a topic
• Deepen expertise
• Keep current on
the latest news
7
5. Assist
• Respond to a request
• Respond to a client
request for information.
proposal, or support
• Submit a proposal...
8
6. Build
• Develop and deliver
eminence and thought
leadership
• Write a document or
presentation
• Build and deliver a
...
9
7. Offer
• Answer questions
• Provide points of view,
proven practices, lessons
learned, examples,
official methods
• Ge...
10
8. Resolve
• Identify issues
• Solve problems
• Fix something which is
broken
11
9. Ask
• Ask questions
• Request advice
• Submit a query or request
12
10. Transfer
• Transfer knowledge
• Share links, insights, lessons
learned, tips, tricks, techniques
• Contribute reusa...
13
11. Innovate
• Develop new and better ways
of serving clients
• Solicit ideas
• Manage the innovation
process
• Improve...
14
12. Onboard
• Onboard new hires or team
members
• Get oriented as a new hire or
team member
• Orient new clients
15
13. Network
• Connect to others with similar
interests
• Work together as part of a
team
• Connect multiple organizatio...
16
SIRCL
• Share new ideas, lessons learned, proven practices,
insights, and practical suggestions.
• Innovate through bra...
17
Communities of Practice
Share a link. “Here is a link to the latest Forrester report.”
Ask a question. “Has anyone enco...
18
5 Questions to Ask Before
Starting a New Community
1. Is there an existing community which
covers the topic or a relate...
19
1. Is there an existing community which
covers the topic or a related one?
• If so, offer to become a co-
leader of tha...
20
2. Is the topic defined using widely-
understood terminology?
• Try to use industry-
standard, conventional
terms
• Avo...
21
3. Are people likely to want to join in
sufficient numbers to achieve critical
mass (100 or more)? They should:
• Ident...
22
4. Are you willing to spend the time it
takes to lead a community by performing
the following activities?
• Schedule: L...
23
5. Are you willing to measure the community
by the following health indicators?
• Activity: at least one post to the
co...
LinkedIn Posts
https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/stangarfield
For additional information
• Join the SIKM Leaders CoP http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/
• Twitter @stangarf...
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Use Cases for Communities of Practice

Presentation on April 7, 2017 to Columbia University’s Master of Science in Information and Knowledge Strategy (IKNS) Program in the School of Professional Studies

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Use Cases for Communities of Practice

  1. 1. M A S T E R O F S C I E N C E I N Information and Knowledge Strategy Use Cases for Communities of Practice Stan Garfield April 7, 2017
  2. 2. 2 COLLABORATION 1. Communicate 2. Obtain 3. Locate 4. Learn 5. Assist 6. Build 7. Offer 8. Resolve 9. Ask 10. Transfer 11. Innovate 12. Onboard 13. Network
  3. 3. 3 1. Communicate • Inform the organization about your activities. plans, and progress • Interact with colleagues • Solicit input, feedback, advice • Relax, refresh, relieve tension, laugh
  4. 4. 4 2. Obtain • Gain assistance from others • Find out what others are doing • Retrieve information • Receive answers to questions
  5. 5. 5 3. Locate • Locate subject matter specialists • Find documents, credentials, references, sites, official methods, lessons learned, proven practices • Find needed resources
  6. 6. 6 4. Learn • Learn more about a topic • Deepen expertise • Keep current on the latest news
  7. 7. 7 5. Assist • Respond to a request • Respond to a client request for information. proposal, or support • Submit a proposal • Deliver a product, project, service, or client engagement • Provide thought leadership
  8. 8. 8 6. Build • Develop and deliver eminence and thought leadership • Write a document or presentation • Build and deliver a product or service
  9. 9. 9 7. Offer • Answer questions • Provide points of view, proven practices, lessons learned, examples, official methods • Get staffed on a project or client engagement • Lead an effort • Praise, recognize, and thank colleagues
  10. 10. 10 8. Resolve • Identify issues • Solve problems • Fix something which is broken
  11. 11. 11 9. Ask • Ask questions • Request advice • Submit a query or request
  12. 12. 12 10. Transfer • Transfer knowledge • Share links, insights, lessons learned, tips, tricks, techniques • Contribute reusable content
  13. 13. 13 11. Innovate • Develop new and better ways of serving clients • Solicit ideas • Manage the innovation process • Improve existing products, services, processes, and tools • Invent new products, services, processes, and tools
  14. 14. 14 12. Onboard • Onboard new hires or team members • Get oriented as a new hire or team member • Orient new clients
  15. 15. 15 13. Network • Connect to others with similar interests • Work together as part of a team • Connect multiple organizations to deliver services as one
  16. 16. 16 SIRCL • Share new ideas, lessons learned, proven practices, insights, and practical suggestions. • Innovate through brainstorming, building on each other's ideas, and keeping informed on emerging developments. • Reuse solutions through asking and answering questions, applying shared insights, and retrieving posted material. • Collaborate through threaded discussions, conversations, and interactions. • Learn from other members of the community; from invited guest speakers about successes, failures, case studies, and new trends; and through mentoring.
  17. 17. 17 Communities of Practice Share a link. “Here is a link to the latest Forrester report.” Ask a question. “Has anyone encountered this problem before, and if so, how was it solved?” Find a resource. “Looking for a specialist in welfare benefits to help in a project.” Answer a post. “Here are links to three relevant documents in the knowledge database.” Recognize a colleague. “Thanks to John Smith for helping solve a difficult problem.” Inform about your activities. “Working on a new wellness initiative.” Suggest an idea. “I think we should invite Nobel laureates to attend our recognition event.” SAFARIS
  18. 18. 18 5 Questions to Ask Before Starting a New Community 1. Is there an existing community which covers the topic or a related one? 2. Is the topic defined using widely- understood terminology? 3. Are people likely to want to join in sufficient numbers to achieve critical mass? 4. Are you willing to spend the time it takes to lead a community? 5. Are you willing to measure the community using monthly health indicators?
  19. 19. 19 1. Is there an existing community which covers the topic or a related one? • If so, offer to become a co- leader of that community rather than creating a new one • Add a tab, section, or link to a sub-page on that community's site (e.g., sub- topic, local chapter, etc.) • Share collaboration tools such as an enterprise social network (ESN) group
  20. 20. 20 2. Is the topic defined using widely- understood terminology? • Try to use industry- standard, conventional terms • Avoid esoteric or company-specific nomenclature • Start with as broad a topic as is reasonable
  21. 21. 21 3. Are people likely to want to join in sufficient numbers to achieve critical mass (100 or more)? They should: • Identify with it: view themselves as specializing in it • Be deeply interested in it, view it as relevant to their work, and want to deepen their understanding of it • Be willing to spend time learning and collaborating about it
  22. 22. 22 4. Are you willing to spend the time it takes to lead a community by performing the following activities? • Schedule: Line up speakers and set up events • Host: Initiate and run conference calls, webinars, and face-to-face meetings • Answer: Ensure that questions in the Yammer group receive replies, that discussions are relevant, and that behavior is appropriate • Post: Share information which is useful to the members by posting to the discussion board, blog, and newsletter • Expand: attract new members and content contributions
  23. 23. 23 5. Are you willing to measure the community by the following health indicators? • Activity: at least one post to the community discussion board per week, posts by more than two different people, no questions left unanswered after 24 hours • Content: at least one document, newsletter, announcement, or blog entry posted to the community site per month, and content is reviewed to ensure that it is appropriate, current, and accurate • Membership: at least 100 members after the first three months, with growth in membership every quarter thereafter • Events: at least one conference call, webinar, or face-to-face meeting every quarter, listed in the community events calendar, held as planned, with at least 10 people participating in each event
  24. 24. LinkedIn Posts https://www.linkedin.com/today/author/stangarfield
  25. 25. For additional information • Join the SIKM Leaders CoP http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/sikmleaders/ • Twitter @stangarfield • Site http://sites.google.com/site/stangarfield/ • Implementing a Successful KM Program https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/implementing- successful-km-program-100th-post-20-years-stan-garfield Implementing a Successful KM Program (author) Successful Knowledge Leadership: Principles and Practice (chapter author) The Modern Knowledge Leader: A Results-Oriented Approach Gaining Buy-in for KM (chapter author) Managing the ROI of Knowledge Management (chapter author) The Case against ROI

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