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IC12 - Leading Change in Rotary Clubs - Breakout Session

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IC12 - Leading Change in Rotary Clubs - Breakout Session

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Breakout session presented on Tuesday 8 May at the 2012 Rotary International Convention in Bangkok. Session: Leading Change in Rotary Clubs. Session Organizer: David Stocks.

Breakout session presented on Tuesday 8 May at the 2012 Rotary International Convention in Bangkok. Session: Leading Change in Rotary Clubs. Session Organizer: David Stocks.

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IC12 - Leading Change in Rotary Clubs - Breakout Session

  1. 1. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Rotary International Convention 2012 Bangkok 2012 May 8 1
  2. 2. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs The Panelists  Meredith Green  Richard Clarke  David Stocks 2012 May 8 2
  3. 3. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Structure of this breakout session  Presentations for about 35 minutes.  A Question & Answer period for about 55 minutes including discussion of your experiences and concerns. 2012 May 8 3
  4. 4. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Expectations for the presentation part  After the presentation, you will know concepts and vocabulary for planning and managing changes.  You will also have confidence in the academic foundation for change management practices. 2012 May 8 4
  5. 5. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Expectations for the whole session  You will have fresh ideas for leading your clubs in new directions and a framework for planning and managing the desired changes.  You can apply the same concepts at different levels of Rotary.  You will forgive our point of view  Europe & North America 2012 May 8 5
  6. 6. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 6
  7. 7. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Is “Change” needed in Rotary? “It is not the strongest species that survive, nor the most intelligent but the ones that are most responsive to change.” Charles Darwin “Change is not necessary. Survival is optional.” W. Edwards Deming 2012 May 8 7
  8. 8. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs What should NOT change in Rotary? “…any great organization that has lasted over the years owes its resiliency to being willing to change everything about itself except its beliefs.” Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Our Beliefs:  Service Above Self.  They profit most who serve the best.  Truth, fairness, mutual benefit, goodwill. 2012 May 8 8
  9. 9. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Is “change” difficult? “there is nothing more difficult to arrange, more doubtful of success, and more dangerous to carry through than initiating change” Niccolo Machiavelli, 1514 2012 May 8 9
  10. 10. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Are changes happening in Rotary?  Club adopts the Club Leadership Plan.  Incoming Club President demands change to pre-payment of meals.  TRF introduces on-line contributions.  New service projects are chosen.  Club changes meeting time from lunch to breakfast. 2012 May 8 10
  11. 11. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Do leaders have a role in change?  PRIP Richard King: “The Club President’s job is to change the club from what it is to what it should be.”  RIP Banerjee says “change” is one of the three emphases in his theme.  Jean Riboud tells us: If you want to innovate, to change a club, you must be willing to do what is not expected. 2012 May 8 11
  12. 12. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 12
  13. 13. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Types of changes - 1 • Externally driven • Affects multiple clubs • Little control over the result Evolution Conflict Club Membership New Rules for Youth Exchange Derived from Van de Ven and Poole (1996). Academy of Management Review 2012 May 8
  14. 14. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Types of changes - 2 • Internally driven • Affects a single club • Measurable results Planned Emergent Change from lunch Adjust a fund- to breakfast raising project Derived from Van de Ven and Poole (1996). Academy of Management Review 2012 May 8
  15. 15. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Types of changes - 3 Evolution Conflict Club Membership New Rules for Youth Exchange Planned Emergent Change from lunch Adjust a fund- to breakfast raising project Derived from Van de Ven and Poole (1996). Academy of Management Review 2012 May 8
  16. 16. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 16
  17. 17. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Components of a planned change  An defined need with measurable results  A solution decision by Club leadership  A Project to be managed by a committee  Change Management – a job for Club leaders 2012 May 8 17
  18. 18. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs A sample defined need  A club meets at lunch.  Membership is declining.  Departing members say they can’t attend a lunch meeting.  Some former members are joining a breakfast club in a nearby town.  Some members are leaving Rotary completely. Club leaders need to stop members leaving. 2012 May 8 18
  19. 19. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Components of a planned change A solution decision by Club leadership:  Change meeting time from lunch to breakfast A Project to be managed by a committee:  Find a new meeting place  Negotiate menu and price  Arrange for storage of regalia Change Management – a job for Club leaders:  Explain the reasons for the change  Explain what will change and not change  Allow members to influence the change  Manage resistance 2012 May 8 19
  20. 20. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs How should we measure the success of a planned change program? It does not matter how wonderful the breakfast meeting arrangements are. The change program is only successful if… …members stop leaving! 2012 May 8 20
  21. 21. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The Learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 21
  22. 22. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs A stable Rotary club ROTARY CLUB ENVIRONMENT Service People Service Goals Delivery Processes Technology Structure …in a complex context 2012 May 8 22
  23. 23. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Club environment components  Familiarity  Motivation  Culture People  Methods  Web site  Procedures  Accounting  Recognition  Social media Processes Technology Structure  Leadership  Committees  Roles and responsibilities 2012 May 8 23
  24. 24. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Change and Adoption  Change is a process, not an event  Changes require a transformation of personal frames of reference  No pain, no gain 2012 May 8 24
  25. 25. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs The personal change process “It takes courage to CURRENT UNFRAME release the familiar and SITUATION seemingly secure to embrace the new. But I must let go! there is no real security My comfort is gone! in what is no longer meaningful.” Alan Cohen 2012 May 8 25
  26. 26. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs The personal change process CURRENT TARGET UNFRAME TRANSITION REFRAME SITUATION SITUATION Can I adapt? I must let go! Can I learn this? My comfort is gone! Will I re-gain comfort? Time 2012 May 8 26
  27. 27. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs The personal change process CURRENT TARGET UNFRAME TRANSITION REFRAME SITUATION SITUATION  confusion  stress  unchanelled energy  criticism and conflicts  nostalgia for the “good old days”  The Learning Curve Time 2012 May 8 27
  28. 28. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The Learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 28
  29. 29. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs The basic learning curve Internalization Commitment Contact Time adapted from Lewin (1947) and Przybylinski, Fowler, & Maher (1991) 2012 May 8 29
  30. 30. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Is “change” difficult? “men are generally incredulous, never really trusting new things unless they have tested them by experience.” Niccolo Machiavelli, 1514 2012 May 8 30
  31. 31. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs We go through stages when we climb the curve: some faster, some slower Internalization Commitment Adoption Trial Understanding Awareness Contact Time 2012 May 8 31
  32. 32. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs We go through stages when we climb the curve: some faster, some slower Internalization Commitment Adoption Trial Understanding Awareness Contact Time 2012 May 8 32
  33. 33. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Leaders help members up the curve Internalization Commitment Adoption Trial Reinforcement Understanding Coaching Education Awareness Contact Communication Time adapted from Przybylinski, Fowler and Maher (1991) 2012 May 8 34
  34. 34. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Leading change effectively  Dissatisfied with the current situation  Clear vision of the desired situation  Understands the impact on individuals  Shows commitment publicly  Demonstrates commitment in private  Constant and prolonged support Adapted from ODR. Inc. 2012 May 8 35
  35. 35. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Cascading Leadership Authorizing Leader Reinforcing Reinforcing Leader Leader Reinforcing Reinforcing Reinforcing Reinforcing Leader Leader Leader Leader Member Member Member Member Member Member Member Member 2012 May 8 36
  36. 36. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Leading Change in a Rotary Club  Authorizing leadership from the President is essential.  Reinforcing leadership from Directors & committee chairs is essential.  Club leadership team must develop a consensus before the change program begins. 2012 May 8 37
  37. 37. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Responsibilities of members in the change process  Ask why the change is necessary  Clarify the impact that the change will have on them  Determine how and to what extent they can influence the change  Be proactive in researching information on the change 2012 May 8 38
  38. 38. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Real life is a series of changes: avoid the Big Bang Continuous improvement Education Reinforcement Coaching Education Communication Time adapted from Przybylinski, Fowler and Maher (1991) 2012 May 8 39
  39. 39. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Agenda  Why should we discuss this topic?  Types of changes  Components of a planned change  Losing and regaining stability  The Learning Curve  Resistance 2012 May 8 40
  40. 40. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Is “change” difficult? “The innovator makes enemies of all those who prospered under the old order and only lukewarm support is forthcoming from those who would prosper under the new.” Niccolo Machiavelli, 1514 2012 May 8 41
  41. 41. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Keys to understanding resistance The “merits” of the change are irrelevant. Most people only listen to the radio station WIIT-FM • What’s In It For Me 2012 May 8
  42. 42. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Distribution of adopters over time Cumulative 16% resisters adoption 34% late majority 34% advanced majority 13.5 % early adopters 2.5% innovators Time adapted from Raghavan and Chand (1989) 2012 May 8 43
  43. 43. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Distribution of adopters over time Cumulative Unwilling 16% resisters adoption 34% late majority Unable 34% advanced majority Unknowing 13.5 % early adopters 2.5% innovators Time adapted from Raghavan and Chand (1989) 2012 May 8 44
  44. 44. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Resistance has 100 faces Overt  Discrediting the promoters  Discrediting the change  We do things differently here  It’s not practical enough  It is the wrong time Covert  Silence  Submission 2012 May 8 45
  45. 45. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Managing resistance: a win-lose approach Eliminate resistance by threat, flattery, or force. Discredit resistance by appealing to the need for conformity, appealing to tradition, or by making the resisters feel guilty. Ignore the resistance by refusing to recognise it or to acknowledge it. 2012 May 8 46
  46. 46. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Managing resistance: a win-lose approach Eliminate resistance by threat, flattery, or force. Discredit resistance by appealing to the need for conformity, appealing to tradition, or by making the resisters feel guilty. Ignore the resistance by refusing to recognise it or to acknowledge it. 2012 May 8 47
  47. 47. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Managing resistance: a win-win approach Express clearly what must change and why. Encourage the expression of resistance. Listen! Explore. Ask about the reasons for resistance. Thank the persons for their collaboration. If you have learned something, say so. 2012 May 8 48
  48. 48. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs Managing change: Summary  Change is a reality for all of us  Change disrupts a stable club  Change needs un-framing and re-framing  We must help people up the learning curve  Change needs cascading leadership  Members can help to make the change  Resistance is real but can be managed 2012 May 8 49
  49. 49. Leading Change In Rotary Clubs That completes the Presentation part. Please share your experiences…  …with changes that went well  …with obstacles to change  …with changes that went poorly Questions welcome! 2012 May 8 50

Notas do Editor

  • Mention that we come from the North American culture but many attendees come from other cultures.Therefore, we hope that the attendees will bring out various cultural refinements during the Q&A period.
  • Mention that we come from the North American culture but many attendees come from other cultures.Therefore, we hope that the attendees will bring out various cultural refinements during the Q&A period.

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