O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

Finding the Story in Quantitative Information

Lesson 3 of 6 in this NewMR series by Ray Poynter, looking at how to find and communicate the story in the data.

Audiolivros relacionados

Gratuito durante 30 dias do Scribd

Ver tudo
  • Seja o primeiro a comentar

Finding the Story in Quantitative Information

  1. 1. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Finding  and   Communica-ng  the  Story   Lesson  3  of  6   Working  with  Quan-ta-ve   Informa-on   Ray  Poynter       May  2016  
  2. 2. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Series  Schedule   •  An  Introduc5on  and  Overview  -­‐  Feb  23     •  Working  with  Qualita5ve  Informa5on  –  Apr  5     •  Working  with  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on    -­‐  May  26     •  Working  with  mul5ple  streams  &  big  data  -­‐  July  5     •  U5lizing  visualiza5on  –  Sep  13     •  Presen5ng  the  story  -­‐  Nov  8    
  3. 3. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Agenda   •  Brief  recap   •  Prepara5on   •  Main  story   •  5Cs  and  finding  insight   •  Communica5ng  quan5ta5ve  messages  
  4. 4. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   The  Frameworks  Approach   1.  Define  and  frame  the  problem   –  A  problem  fully  defined  is  a  problem  half  solved   2.  Establish  what  is  already  known   –  Find  out  what  is  believed  and  what  the  expecta5ons  are   3.  Organise  the  data  to  be  analysed   –  Systema5c  checking  and  structural  procedures   4.  Apply  systema5c  analysis  processes   5.  Extract  and  create  the  story  
  5. 5. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Gathering,  Checking  &  Transforming   Start  the  process  during  fieldwork   Checks  include:   –  Look  at  the  open-­‐ended  comments   –  Check  for  problems,  e.g.  ques5ons  not  answered,   breaks  without  answers,  lots  of  DKs  or  NAs   –  Speeders,  straight-­‐liners,  and  other  queries   –  Common  sense,  e.g.  do  people  prefer  the  expected   op5ons,  do  most  people  have  fewer  than  5  children   etc  
  6. 6. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Is  My  Data  Right?   We  see  pa^erns,  even   when  they  are  not  there.     Most  of  the  5me,  when   you  find  something  ‘very   interes5ng’  in  the  data  it   will  be  an  error.  
  7. 7. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Spurious  Correla-ons   h^p://www.tylervigen.com/  
  8. 8. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   ESOMAR  Pricing  Study   •  Global  Study  every  2  years   •  Over  600  agency  responses   •  Bidding  on  7  projects  +  tariffs   – 25  separate  cost  op5ons   •  Over  120  countries,  over  60  currencies   •  Analysis  currently  taking  place  
  9. 9. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   ESOMAR  Pricing  Study  –  Check  and  Transform   •  Convert  66  currencies  into  USD  $   •  Check  open-­‐ended  comments  ‘cost  per  group’,   ‘does  not  include  presenta0on’,  etc   •  Check  if  the  quotes  are  plausible:   – $1.5  million  for  a  concept  test,  $50  for  a  tracking   study,  etc   – ESOMAR  check  all  queries  (IDs  anonymous  to  me)   Shout  Out:  Bryel  Parnell  –  Berry    
  10. 10. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Are  Bids  Plausible?   P1A   P1B   P1C   Mean   17,597   20,210   13,528   Median   12,450   14,224   9,800   Min   2,200   2,760   882   Max   114,769   126,830   126,150   Count   356   400   309   Random  numbers  in  table   Checking  &  Transforming   is  part  of  Story  Finding  
  11. 11. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Transforming  the  Data   Do  bases  need  adjus5ng?     – ‘Do  you  drive  to  work?’,  base  might  need  to  be   Drivers,  or  Drivers  who  Work.   Addi5onal  groupings  (e.g.  top  2  boxes,   Promoter,  Detractor,  NPS  etc)   Standardising,  indexing,  or  otherwise  re-­‐shaping   the  data  for  analysis  
  12. 12. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Find  the  Total  Picture  First   Then  the  relevant  detail   •  Look  at  the  Total  Column   •  Look  for  big  numbers  and  big  pa^erns   •  What  is  the  big  picture?   •  This  will  frame  the  detail   In  the  context  of  the  Business  Ques5on  
  13. 13. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Where  does  the  best  MR  come  from?   Column  %   Which  of  the  following  best  describes  you?   Countries  Merged   Total   Research  or   Consultancy   Supplier   Supplier  to  the   research  industry   Research  Buyer/ User   Academic  +  Other   English  Speaking   Non-­‐English   Speaking   UK   63%   61%   60%   92%   40%   66%   60%   USA   51%   52%   50%   46%   60%   52%   50%   Germany   18%   13%   30%   15%   60%   16%   21%   Australia   15%   14%   15%   15%   20%   16%   12%   Canada   11%   8%   20%   0%   40%   9%   14%   France   7%   7%   10%   8%   0%   7%   7%   Japan   5%   3%   15%   0%   0%   3%   7%   Brazil   3%   3%   5%   0%   0%   3%   2%   China   2%   1%   5%   0%   0%   3%   0%   Italy   2%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   5%   Other   8%   10%   10%   0%   0%   9%   7%   None  of  these   11%   15%   5%   0%   0%   9%   14%   Column  n   109   71   20   13   5   67   42   The  wrong  approach  to  star5ng  analysis  
  14. 14. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Where  does  the  best  MR  come  from?   Column  %   Which  of  the  following  best  describes  you?   Countries  Merged   Total   Research  or   Consultancy   Supplier   Supplier  to  the   research  industry   Research  Buyer/ User   Academic  +  Other   English  Speaking   Non-­‐English   Speaking   UK   63%   61%   60%   92%   40%   66%   60%   USA   51%   52%   50%   46%   60%   52%   50%   Germany   18%   13%   30%   15%   60%   16%   21%   Australia   15%   14%   15%   15%   20%   16%   12%   Canada   11%   8%   20%   0%   40%   9%   14%   France   7%   7%   10%   8%   0%   7%   7%   Japan   5%   3%   15%   0%   0%   3%   7%   Brazil   3%   3%   5%   0%   0%   3%   2%   China   2%   1%   5%   0%   0%   3%   0%   Italy   2%   1%   5%   0%   0%   0%   5%   Other   8%   10%   10%   0%   0%   9%   7%   None  of  these   11%   15%   5%   0%   0%   9%   14%   Column  n   109   71   20   13   5   67   42  
  15. 15. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%   Which  Country  Produces  the  Best  MR?   The  Big  Message   Big  story   Ques-ons   Why  are  the  UK  &  USA  so  high/different?   Is  this  true  for  everybody?   What  are  the  implica5ons  of  this?  
  16. 16. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Use  the  Business  Ques-on  as  a  Lens   The  same  data  will  deliver  different  stories,  based   on  different  business  ques5ons   This  is  one  of  the  reasons  that  industry  reports  have   a  less  focused  story   –  They  have  many  readers,  with  different  needs  and   ques5ons   The  business  ques5on  defines  what  is  in,  what  is   out,  and  where  the  magnifica5on  should  be  
  17. 17. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Find  the  Relevant  Detail   Once  you  have  the  total  story:   – Are  there  people  who  have  a  different  story   (different  from  the  main  story)?   – Who  are  these  people?   – What  is  their  story?   – Why  are  they  different?   – What  are  the  business  implica5ons  of  this   difference  (these  differences)?  
  18. 18. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Different  Perspec-ves   ASK:   The  alterna0ve   explana0ons  for  this   data  are?  
  19. 19. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Findings  Need  a  Comparator   RFID  
  20. 20. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Finding  and  communica-ng   the  story  in  health  data  
  21. 21. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Bad  news  for  men  in  Eastern  Europe   Eurostat  -­‐  h^p://goo.gl/r2q526   Amenable  Deaths  Per  100000  of  popula5on  -­‐  2012  
  22. 22. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   114,740  Avoidable  Deaths     in  England  and  Wales  in  2013   114,740  deaths  out  of  506,790  (nearly  25%)  were   avoidable  in  2013  in  England  &  Wales.  According  to   the  UK  Office  for  Na5onal  Sta5s5cs:  h^p://goo.gl/ oJYMgo      
  23. 23. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   USA  and  Smoking   Leading  cause  preventable  deaths   h^p://www.cdc.gov/healthreport/publica5ons/compendium.pdf  
  24. 24. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   The  Tenuous  Link  Between  Finding   the  Story  and  Telling  the  Story   In  finding  the  story  we  have  mul5ple  data  sources   We  have  differing  degrees  of  confidence  in  those  sources   –  A  conjoint  study  with  consul5ng  surgeons  might  be  our   best  source  for  finding  the  story   The  best  way  to  convey  the  story  does  not  have  to  rest   on  the  ‘best’  data   –  A  vox  pop  video  with  a  pa5ent  might  be  a  poor  way  to  find   the  story,  but  it  can  be  a  great  way  to  tell  the  story  
  25. 25. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Visualiza-on  for  Finding  ≠  Telling   Seth  Godin  Wikipedia  
  26. 26. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   5  Cs  of  Insight   •  Connec5ons   •  Coincidences   •  Curiosi5es   •  Contradic5ons   •  Crea5ve  jump   }  Build  on  the     current  picture   Rethink  an  assump5on   Discard  an  assump5on   HT,  John  Storey,  Abbo^  EPD  
  27. 27. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Connec-ons   •  Charles  Darwin  and  Evolu5on   •  Aware  of  how  farmers  bred  different  sizes  and  shapes   of  cows,  horses,  pigs  etc  –  selec5ve  breeding   •  Visited  Galapagos  and  saw  varie5es  of  sizes/shapes   •  Read  Malthus’  essay  on  popula5on  growth  and   compe55on  for  resources   •  Made  the  connec5on  to  realise  that  compe55on  for   resources  was  the  hand  behind  the  selec5ve  breeding  
  28. 28. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Connec-ons   U&A  for  a  brand  shows  strong  associa5on   with  “Hospitals”   What  do  we  know  about  hospitals,  smells  and   implica5ons  for  this  type  of  product   – Cleaning  –  strong,  clean,  but  not  homely   – Food  –  not  so  good   – Technology  –  good  but  cold  
  29. 29. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Coincidences   •  US  doctor  Michael  Go^lieb   •  31  year  old  pa5ent,  unusual  symptoms,  auto-­‐ immune  disorder.  Being  gay  irrelevant.   •  2  more  pa5ents,  similar  unusual  symptoms.   Coincidence  –  they  were  also  gay.   •  Go^lieb  explored  the  coincidence  (with  a   prepared  mind)  and  found  AIDS  
  30. 30. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Coincidences   •  Different  studies  are  showing  that  over  55s     are  more  likely  to  do  a  variety  of  online  ac5vi5es   on  Tablets  –  compared  to  younger  age  groups   •  Ques5on:  Are  the  older  group  turning  away  from   PCs  and  perhaps  not  turning  to  Smartphones?   •  Explore  whether  this  is  true  and  what  the   implica5ons  are  
  31. 31. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Curiosi-es   •  Bri5sh  research  Alexander  Flemming   •  Researching  Staphylococcus   •  Went  on  holiday  in  August,  leaving  petri  dishes   with  the  bacteria   •  On  return,  one  had  developed  a  mould  and  near   the  mould  the  bacteria  had  died   •  This  curiosity,  connected  with  a  prepared  mind,   led  to  penicillin  
  32. 32. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Curiosi-es   •  Researching  a  new  brand  of  strong,  dark   chocolate   •  Parents  of  small  children  over-­‐index  on  liking   it.  In  open-­‐ends,  one  par5cipant  men5ons   buying  it  because  her  children  don’t  like  it   •  Hmm,  is  this  an  insight,  let’s  dig  deeper  
  33. 33. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Contradic-ons   •  19th  Century  London,  John  Snow  is     inves5ga5ng  cholera   •  Predominant  theory  =  cholera  is  airborne   •  But!  He  looks  at  corpses.  The  lungs  look  good,   but  their  diges5ve  system  looked  damaged   CONTRADICTION   •  He  looked  for  inges5on  routes  and  discovered   cholera  was  spread  via  drinking  water  
  34. 34. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Contradic-ons   •  Client  has  a  product  which  is  liked  by  children,   but  is  not  successful  –  they  believe  parents  are   not  buying  it   •  Research  brief,  find  out  how  to  persuade  more   parents  to  buy  it  for  their  children   •  But,  looking  in  trash  cans  finds  lots  of  uneaten   product  –  CONTRADICTION  many  children  do  not   actually  like  it  
  35. 35. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Crea-ve  Jump   4  straight  lines   Not  leaving  the  paper  
  36. 36. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Crea-ve  Jump   4  straight  lines   Not  leaving  the  paper   Outside  the  box  -­‐  really  
  37. 37. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Crea-ve  Jump   •  When  people  use  it  they  love  it   – Make  it  free  and  charge  for  the  refills   •  These  candles  are  too  nice  to  burn  (use)   – See  them  as  giws  not  consumables   •  Growth  in  people  wan5ng  to  split  bills   – App  payment  designed  to  help  diners  and   restaurants  
  38. 38. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Example  from  GRIT  2016   Sneak  Peek   for  Japan  
  39. 39. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   A  Business  Ques-on?   Based  on  the  2016  GRIT  Study     What  advice  would  I  offer  the  Japanese   Research  industry?    
  40. 40. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Framework  Informa-on   What  other  data  is  there?   •  Previous  GRIT  studies   •  ESOMAR  GMR  and  Prices   studies   •  FocusVision  /  Tim  Macer   studies   •  My  own  informa5on  from   working  with  JMRX  and   clients   What  were  the  predic-ons?   •  Japan  would  be  behind  in   adop5ng  new  research   approaches  –  several   sources  for  this  predic5on   •  The  support  for  Japanese   research  brands  would  be   mainly  from  Japan  –   Japanese  commentator   •  and  more  …  
  41. 41. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   2  Elements  to  the  Ques-on   1.  What  advice  for  the  Japanese  research   industry  is  same  as  same  as  advice  for   research  industry  in  general   2.  What  advice  is  specific  to  the  Japanese   research  industry   So,  the  Total  Picture  is  the  Global   version  of  the  GRIT  Study  
  42. 42. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Most  Innova-ve  Supplier   2016 Global 1   Brainjuicer 2   Ipsos 3   InSites Consulting 4   Nielsen 5   GFK 6   TNS 7   Vision Critical 8   LRW 9   Millward Brown 10   Google 22 Intage/インテージ 24 Macromill/マクロミル Japan # Company Global # 1   Intage/インテージ 22   2   Macromill/マクロミル 24   3   Brainjuicer 1   4   Nielsen 4   5   Kantar 16   6   GMO Research 50+   7   Vision Critical 7   8   Google 10   9   Ipsos 2   10   InSites Consulting 3   Base:  Global  2144,  Japan  108  
  43. 43. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Innova-ve  Supplier  Story  Notes   Total  Picture   •  BrainJuicer  dominate   •  Leader  board  a  mix  of  ‘small’   and  large  companies   •  Leader  board  rela5vely  stable   over  last  3  years   •  But,  2  Japanese  companies   now  in  the  top  25   Japan  Specific  Notes   •  Top  2  brands  both  Japanese   –  BrainJuicer  global  image   strength  reaffirmed   •  3  of  the  top  ten  brands  in   Japan  are  Japanese   •  Almost  all  the  votes  for   Macromill  and  Intage  come   from  Japan   –  Confirming  a  predic5on  from   Japan  
  44. 44. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Is  the  overall  quality  of  sample  going  to  get  beber,   worse  or  stay  the  same  over  the  next  3  years?   27%   38%   25%   11%   0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%   80%   Be^er   Worse   Stay  the  same   Not  sure   Global   Japan   Base:  Global  2144,  Japan  108   Total  Picture   Divided  opinion  about   future  of  sample  quality  
  45. 45. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Japan?   27%   38%   25%   11%  8%   69%   15%   7%   0%   10%   20%   30%   40%   50%   60%   70%   80%   Be^er   Worse   Stay  the  same   Not  sure   Global   Japan   Ques5on:  Is  the  overall  quality  of  sample  going  to  get  be^er,   worse  or  stay  the  same  over  the  next  three  years?   Base:  Global  2144,  Japan  108   Total  Picture   Divided  opinion  about   future  of  sample  quality   Japan  Picture   Sample  quality  going   off  a  cliff.  
  46. 46. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Japan  Overall  Story  &  Recommenda-ons   Story   •  Japan  is  fairly  similar  to  the   Global  picture   •  But,  Japan  is  behind  Europe   and  North  America  in   adop5on  of  new  technologies   &  Automa5on   •  Japan  has  some  strong   domes5c  brands  –  but  their   image  is  largely  domes5c   Recommenda-ons   •  In  technology/approaches   focus  on  developing  mobile   and  online  communi5es   •  In  automa5on,  focus  on     Project  Design,  Survey  Design,   Image  Processing,  and   Repor5ng   •  Japan’s  brands  need  to  learn   from  BrainJuicer,  InSites,  and   Vision  Cri5cal  in  terms  of   regional  and  global  image  
  47. 47. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Good  and  Bad  News   •  There  are  four  typical  stories   –  Good  news   –  Good  news  with  caveats   –  Bad  news  with  some  op5ons   –  Bad  news   •  The  storytelling  for  these  four  cases  is  different   •  Good  news  and  bad  news  is  defined  by  what  the   client  wanted  AND  what  the  research  finds  
  48. 48. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Bad  News   •  5  stages  of  grief   –  Anger,  Denial,  Bargaining,  Depression,  Acceptance   •  One  presenta5on/report  rarely  tackles  all  the  stages  of   bad  news   •  ‘Facts’  are  rarely  enough  to  persuade   –  Emo5ons  are  the  key  –  a  customer  video  can  be  more   powerful  than  any  amount  of  analysis   •  Go  back  to  a  point  where  the  expecta5ons  match  the   findings  and  build  from  there  
  49. 49. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Communica-ng  Stories  Found  in   Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Minimise  the  use  of  numbers  in  quan5ta5ve   communica5on   Minimise  the  use  of  digits  in  communica5on   Illustrate  the  general  with  the  personal   What  do  you  want  people  to:   – Think,  Feel,  Do?  
  50. 50. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Architecture  of  a  Typical  Story   •  Elevator  Pitch   •  3  suppor5ng  themes   •  3  pieces  of  evidence  for  each  theme   •  Execu5ve  summary,  including  the  elevator  pitch   and  the  three  themes   •  All  other  detail  goes  in  the  appendix  or  sent   separately   HT  Mike  Sherman  
  51. 51. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Schedule   •  An  Introduc5on  and  Overview  -­‐  Feb  23     •  Working  with  Qualita5ve  Informa5on  –  Apr  5     •  Working  with  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on    -­‐  May  26     •  Working  with  mul5ple  streams  &  big  data  -­‐  July  5     •  U5lizing  visualiza5on  –  Sep  13     •  Presen5ng  the  story  -­‐  Nov  8    
  52. 52. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Thank  You!       Follow  me  on  Twiber  @RayPoynter     Or  sign-­‐up  to  receive  our  weekly  mailing  at     hbp://NewMR.org      
  53. 53. Finding  and  Communica-ng  the  Story  –  Lesson  3  of  6  –  Quan-ta-ve  Informa-on   Ray  Poynter,  2016   Q  &  A   Ray  Poynter   The  Future  Place  

×