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SOLUTION FOCUSED THERAPY-THE RIDE OF THEIR LIVES
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SOLUTION FOCUSED THERAPY-THE RIDE OF THEIR LIVES
Rachelle Heath
Capella...
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Solution Focused Therapy-The Ride of their Lives
Solution focused brief therapy is a model that emerged from a philosoph...
3
Case Study
A case study in the world of solutions is a map of roads that are intersected by
deconstruction, problematic ...
4
rejects his intimate proposals while Oni is angered by his betrayal of infidelity to pornography.
Oni describes feeling ...
5
construction of competence around love, compliment their competence and adjust their focus to
exploring goals. With purp...
6
theoretical approach. The pathological perspective identifies a singular dysfunction seeking to
treat dysfunction in a m...
7
with embrace. French Canadians also celebrate rites of passage such as birth, marriage and death
held within Roman Catho...
8
Dictionary.com (n.d.) as, “the result or achievement toward which effort is directed.” The goals
and efforts of intimacy...
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Treatment Plan
“Intimacy”
Narrative: A relationship that has profound intimacy physically, emotionally, spiritually and
...
10
Person of a Therapist
The person of a therapist would explore personal core issues identified as signature themes. In
i...
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References
American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Sexual Dysfunctions. In Diagnostic and Statistical
Manual of Menta...
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Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 30(3), 349-58. Retrieved from
http://search.proquest.com.library.capella.edu/doc...
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Solution focused therapy the ride of their lives

  1. 1. SOLUTION FOCUSED THERAPY-THE RIDE OF THEIR LIVES 1 SOLUTION FOCUSED THERAPY-THE RIDE OF THEIR LIVES Rachelle Heath Capella University COUN 5232 Approach Gender Sexuality March 15th , 2016
  2. 2. 2 Solution Focused Therapy-The Ride of their Lives Solution focused brief therapy is a model that emerged from a philosophical linguistic love affair. The 1980’s expanded from a linear dogmatic approach to therapy to one where reality is written into existence. Lynn Hoffman united the experiential constructs of language and meaning dismissing the ideals of an absolute truth. “The theoretical perspective of social constructionism, as it relates to meanings of human experiences, maintains that people develop their sense of what is real through conversation with and observation of others,” (Berg & De Jong 1996 p 376). There for, experiences are created through meaning of language, thus problems must also be of identical creation (Guise 2015). History of Solution Focused Brief Therapy In the latter years of the 1970’s a group of clinicians, primarily Steve De Shazer, Insoo Berg and Miller, formed the Brief Family Therapy Center (BFTC). The foundation of the solution-focused theory was developed within the first two decades of BFTC, rooted in the discovery that a solution was not an undiscovered mathematical equation waiting to be identified; it was simply stored within one’s own convoluted story. In conceptualizing this case study, similar to the success within decades of research done by Berg and De Shazer, it is a great find to watch one master their prosperity. The conceptualized cases vary; the client’s worldview differs, but the ability to construct new meanings for tomorrow is infinite (Berg & De Jong 1996).
  3. 3. 3 Case Study A case study in the world of solutions is a map of roads that are intersected by deconstruction, problematic views of reality that are rerouted by constructs of competence and dissolution redefined by the couple’s goals of destination. Solutions therapy would be open to exploring the couple’s travels jointly, listening to their problem-saturated story, and curiously exploring the routes they have taken, the one-way streets and the inevitable dead ends. The only way to tread forward, exploring the client’s travels is to learn by not being the expert on the ins and outs of their road trip, the route they followed or the way they chose to travel. “Not knowing requires that our understandings, explanations, and interpretations in therapy not be limited by prior experiences or theoretical formed truths, and knowledge, the therapist does not know the intent of any action, but rather must rely on the explanation made by the client,” (Thomas 2013 p 64). “By learning by curiosity, and by taking the client’s story seriously, the therapist joins with the client in mutual exploration of the client’s understandings and experience,” (p 64). Henry and Oni have come for marriage counseling presented with differing constructs of meaning around their sexual relationship. Henry is a Caucasian, French-Canadian male who is thirty-eight years of age and two years into his first marriage. Oni is a Nigerian, African American Female forty-eight years of age and two years into her second marriage. Oni’s first marriage ended after two years due to infidelity. Henry and Oni met through an online dating service just shy of four years ago. The two express a great emotional bond while noting they have had recent tension and fighting. While engaging with the clients they contend regarding problems viewed in their sexual relationship. Henry conveys that he is depressed because Oni
  4. 4. 4 rejects his intimate proposals while Oni is angered by his betrayal of infidelity to pornography. Oni describes feeling cheap when he pursues her while she is resting. Henry would like the frequency of their sexual relationship to increase and views pornography as a resource. The Language of Solution Focused Therapy Solution focused therapy identifies the problem saturated story within the context of the clients language. Oni expresses Henry is cheating on her with white women and she feels like a piece of meat when he attempts to engage in intercourse while she is sleeping. Henry expresses rejection and depression around the kind of man he is. The client’s narratives focus on their problem-saturated story, which is constructed by thoughts of infidelity, feeling devalued, rejected and unsatisfied. Identifying their meaning of language is to explore and expand one’s own culture to encapsulate theirs. Solution Focused Clinical Approach “While exploring the solution, it is essential to understand what previous, ongoing, unsuccessful or partially successful solution attempts have been tried and failed,” (Green & Flemons p 114). “In solution focused interviewing, careful attention is focused on listening for and exploring the client’s words and building the interview questions from the clients latest answer,” (Berg & De Jong 1996 p 377). In the following dialogue the therapist will utilize solution- focused conversations to allow the couple to envision a different future by respecting and analyzing Oni and Henry’s words, indirectly highlighting success, affirming their perceptions, trusting Oni and Henry’s expertise, acknowledging the depth of it and asking for Oni and Henry’s definition of the problem. The dialogue will invite Oni and Henry to hone in on their
  5. 5. 5 construction of competence around love, compliment their competence and adjust their focus to exploring goals. With purposeful intent, cruising through misguided attempts of solutions so that Henry and Oni can wander into exceptions will develop the goals. Henry and Oni Assessment Approach Solution focused therapy approaches assessments and treatment plans like navigating through a suburban neighborhood. The signs are well placed, the streets are well lit and the navigation highlights each turn. The narrative or problem saturated story is deconstructed into viable goals based on the story conveyed. The therapist works towards exploring what is beneficial, exploring resources, identifying the present by introducing the miracle question, encouraging a concrete description of their miracle, and building onto Oni and Henry’s language by strengthening their voice. The therapist assesses their goals by constructing meaning from their illustrated journey. The goals are their own creations, their own ideas and their own successes (Thomas 2013). The therapist then distinguishes their successes in love, reinforces their view of competence, introduces scaling question, compliment their ability to support one another, affirms and compliment’s their goals, suggest tasks of objectives based on their constructions, and places the couple in charge of discontinuing therapy (Thomas 2013). Historical Views, Pathology or Promise The ideas around sex and meanings of sex language (sexological worldview) has undergone a drastic change in society over the last few decades with the expansion of sensually based advertising, elite body imagery, sex education and generational liberation of sexuality. In considering historical views, Henry and Oni may have been received with a pathologic
  6. 6. 6 theoretical approach. The pathological perspective identifies a singular dysfunction seeking to treat dysfunction in a method that presumably serves the client’s diagnosis. American Psychiatric Association (2013) specifies diagnostic criteria for Male Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder F52.0, “Persistently or recurrently deficient sexual sexual/erotic thoughts or fantasies and desire for sexual activity,” (p 440). “The symptoms have persisted for a minimum duration of six months.” “The symptoms cause significant distress in the individual.” “The sexual dysfunction is not better explained by a mental disorder or as a consequence of severe relationship distress or other significant stressors and is not attributable to the effects of a substance or medication or other medical condition,” (p 440). Henry’s specified arousal towards pornography may be viewed in a linear context without identifying the couple’s strengths. The deficit based model would scapegoat Henry while excluding empowerment of the couple’s own natural resources. Diversity in Solution Focused Therapy Solution Focused therapy is derived from meanings of culture and language embedded deep within one’s soul. Language is one of the most important elements in deconstructing and reconstructing one’s worldview. The Nigerian culture is a faith filled culture that teeters between Christian beliefs to indigenous faith. “Sharia law was introduced into the northern Nigerian states from 2000,” (People & Culture n.d.). “It is thought to have been drawn up by Muslim scholars in the early centuries, with parts of it taken directly from the Koran.” The Sharia Law is said to be code for principle around criminal laws. The Sharia Law holds some harsher penalties such as death by stoning for infidelity (People & Culture n.d.). Oni’s culture may speak to her meanings of infidelity, creating anxieties around possibly compromising her beliefs. The French-Canadian culture is a very affectionate culture with an emphasis on relationships. Men and women exchange kisses as a method of greeting, commonly use first names and may greet each other
  7. 7. 7 with embrace. French Canadians also celebrate rites of passage such as birth, marriage and death held within Roman Catholic traditions. Henry’s culture may very well be speaking to his desire for affection. Clarifying meaning can be so profound that deconstructing the absence of meaning may itself solve a fair weather riddle (French Canadians, Countries and their Cultures, n.d). Treatment Plan Treatment plans consist of the identified solution, the narrative for that solution, the goals, the objectives, and the diagnosis. Treatment plan defined by American Heritage Dictionary (n.d.) is, “an orderly step by step conception or proposal for accomplishing an objective.” Solution focused therapy applies an assessment method comprised of solution focused strategies based on the couples own natural resources. Natural resources are uncovered and identified as individual, relational and contextual resources. Individual resources are conveyed through personal dreams, values, self-esteem, and self-awareness and coping skills. Relational resources are conveyed through shared dreams, shared material resources, partner understanding, couple history, relationship skills, shared material resources and joint strategies of coping. Contextual resources are conveyed through careers, cultural community resources, family of origin, economic status, friends, and their extended social network (Murray & Murray Jr. 2004). Identifying a name for the solution is a great basis for writing a treatment plan. The therapist asks questions like “If concerns did not exist, what would your relationship look like,” “If you could name one syllable to describe what you desire for your relationship what would that be?” and “If a miracle were to happen and your marriage was exactly as you imagine it should be, what would you notice?” in order to identify common themes and help the client envision and make those themes concrete. Henry and Oni may name their treatment plan “intimacy.” Goals defined by
  8. 8. 8 Dictionary.com (n.d.) as, “the result or achievement toward which effort is directed.” The goals and efforts of intimacy will be constructed from moments of exceptions, although directed towards solutions. Exception based questions asked by the therapist such as “what about that evening was different,” and “ did you know that Oni loves those intimate moments prior to having sex, that she see’s you both as connected?” Exception questions focus on identifying those unique outcomes. Objectives are described as “something that one’s efforts or actions are intended to attain or accomplish; purpose; goal; target,” (Dictionary.com n.d.). The objectives identify specifics making goals more concrete. The miracle question is a viable question for helping the couple to visualize their solution with small tangible acts. Lastly is a diagnosis. Henry and Oni have come to therapy for relationship distress and sex counseling. The DSM-5 has noted relational distress and sex therapy under other conditions that may be a focus of clinical attention (Murray & Murray Jr. 2004).
  9. 9. 9 Treatment Plan “Intimacy” Narrative: A relationship that has profound intimacy physically, emotionally, spiritually and psychologically. Goals and Objectives: 1) Increasing those moments of physical touching during non-sexual activities. Increase physical forms of intimacy (hugging, kissing, holding hands, cuddling) throughout the day. 2) Sharing raw emotions during spiritual moments. Continue to share your desires and fears when you sense a spiritual connection. 3) Psychologically stimulating each other during physical moments. Continue to explore each other’s intimate dreams respectively. 4) Sharing intimate dreams. Continue telling one another what excites you when you are physically intimate. Interventions: 1) Utilize the miracle question to elicit information for shared marital vision. 2) Utilize scaling questions to create a standard for the couple’s individual needs. 3) Utilize exception questions to uncover exceptions towards the solution. Diagnosis: V61.10, Relationship distress with spouse or intimate partner. V65.49, Sex Counseling.
  10. 10. 10 Person of a Therapist The person of a therapist would explore personal core issues identified as signature themes. In identifying a signature theme, the therapist is able to increase knowledge of self, identify personal meanings of triggers, their history and how they manifested. In addition, one can gain access to their emotions, memories and associations in the current moment of processing therapeutically. The person of a therapist would want to achieve a greater mastery of self (Aponte 2016). Solution Focused Therapy-The Ride of their Lives Solution focused therapy, the ride of their lives. Life is full of ups and downs similar to riding in a vehicle with roads that consist of curves and intersections. The passengers almost sigh a sign of relief when they are traveling down a straight stretch. A solution-focused approach is an approach that utilizes the curves, intersections and straights to help the passengers navigate more straight stretches. In narrating their travels, we are able to guide the client to use their own navigation system. The best way to navigate an end is by quote, the best destinations are found during the most challenging journeys.
  11. 11. 11 References American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Sexual Dysfunctions. In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Publishing. Aponte, H. J. (2016). The Person-of-the-Therapist model. Retrieved March 12, 2016, from http://www.harryjaponte.com/the-person-of-the-therapist-model/ Berg, I. K., & De Jong, P. (1996). Solution-building conversations: Co-constructing a sense of competence with clients. Families in Society, 77(6), 376. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.library.capella.edu/docview/230167321?accountid=27965 French Canadians, Countries and their Cultures. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://www.everyculture.com/wc/Brazil-to-Congo-Republic-of/French-Canadians.html Goals. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved March 15, 2016 from Dictionary.com website http://www.dictionary.com/browse/goals Green, S. K., & Flemons, D. G. (2004). Quickies: The handbook of brief sex therapy (1st ed., 68- 85). New York, NY: W.W. Norton. Murray, C. E., & Murray,Thomas L.,,Jr. (2004). SOLUTION-FOCUSED PREMARITAL COUNSELING: HELPING COUPLES BUILD A VISION FOR THEIR MARRIAGE.
  12. 12. 12 Journal of Marital and Family Therapy, 30(3), 349-58. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com.library.capella.edu/docview/220946365?accountid=27965 People & Culture. (n.d.). Retrieved March 15, 2016, from http://www.our- africa.org/nigeria/people-culture Objective. (n.d.). Dictionary.com Unabridged. Retrieved March 15, 2016 from Dictionary.com website http://www.dictionary.com/browse/objective Thomas, F. N. (2013). Shifts happen: A confluence of influence. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 32(2), 58-71. doi:http://dx.doi.org/101521jsyt201332258 Treatment plan. (n.d.) American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. (2011). Retrieved March 15 2016 from http://www.thefreedictionary.com/treatment+plan

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