Media planning & strategy

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  • Hey ! Very complete and informative presentation ! All these tools must be known by all media strategist and planner. But everybody is not a media planner, so if you want a good tool for media buying and planning, very easy, have a look on www.adintime.com ! Moreover a media expert can help you ! Bye
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  • the notes are phenomenal
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  • NEILSEN STUDY—67% who were multitasking( TV & Internet) more than 90% of them persued unrelated tasks (different purpose).There is a shift from big screen to small screens. The smaller the screen the more time is spent on it.
  • 1---------To understand the marketing problem. An analysis is made of a company and its competitors on the basis of:1. Size and share of the total market.2. Sales history, costs, and profits.3. Distribution practices.4. Methods of selling.5. Use of advertising.6. Identification of prospects.7. Nature of the product.2-------To plan activities that will solve one or more of the marketing problems. Includes the determination of:1. Marketing objectives.2. Product and spending strategy.3. Distribution strategy.4. Which elements of the marketing mix are to be used.5. Identification of “best” market segments.3---------To determine what to communicate through advertisements. Includes the determination of:1. How product can meet consumer needs.2. How product will be positioned in advertisements.3. Copy themes.4. Specific objectives of each advertisement.5. Number and sizes of advertisements4---To translate marketing objectives and strategies into goals that media can accomplish.5---To translate media goals into general guidelines that will control the planner’s selection and use of media. The best strategy alternatives should be selected.6---To determine which broad class of media best fulfills the criteria. Involves comparison and selection of broad media classes such as newspapers, magazines, radio, television, and others. The analysis is called intermedia comparisons. Audience size is one of the major factors used in comparing the various media classes.7----To compare and select the best media within broad classes, again using predetermined criteria. Involves makingdecisions about the following:1. If magazines were recommended, then which magazines?2. If television was recommended, thena. Broadcast or cable television? c. If network, which program(s)?b. Network or spot television? d. If spot, which markets?3. If radio or newspapers were recommended, thenWhich markets shall be used? b. What criteria shall buyers use in making purchases of local media?1. What kind of sponsorship (sole, shared, participating, or other)?2. What levels of reach and frequencywill be required?3. Scheduling: On which days andmonths are commercials to appear?4. Placement of spots: In programs orbetween programs?1.Number of ads to appear and on which days and months.2. Placements of ads: Any preferredposition within media?3. Special treatment: Gatefolds,bleeds, color, etc.4. Desired reach or frequency levels.1. Billboardsa. Location of markets and planof distribution.b. Kinds of outdoor boards to beused.2. Direct mail or other media:Decisions peculiar to those media
  • Continuity refers to a continuous pattern of advertising, which may mean every day, every week, or every month. Food products, FMCGflighting, employs a less regular schedule, with intermittent periodsof advertising and nonadvertising--------banksPulsing is actually a combination of the first two methods. Liquor,events…Cadbury….
  • 1. One exposure of an ad to a target group within a purchase cycle has little or no effect in most circumstances.2. Since one exposure is usually ineffective, the central goal of productive media planning should be to enhance frequency rather than reach
  • 3. The evidence suggests strongly that an exposure frequency of two within a purchase cycle is an effective level.4. Beyond three exposures within a brand purchase cycle or over a period of four or even eight weeks, increasing frequency continues to build advertising effectiveness at a decreasing rate but with no evidence of decline.
  • 5. Although there are general principles with respect to frequency of exposure and its relationship to advertising effectiveness, differential effects by brand are equally important.6. Nothing we have seen suggests that frequency response principles or generalizations vary by medium.7. The data strongly suggest that wearout is not a function of too much frequency; it is more of a creative or copy problem.
  • Brand history. Is the brand new or established? New brands generally require higherfrequency levels.• Brand share. An inverse relationship exists between brand share and frequency. Thehigher the brand share, the lower the frequency level required.• Brand loyalty. An inverse relationship exists between loyalty and frequency. Thehigher the loyalty, the lower the frequency level required.• Purchase cycles. Shorter purchasing cycles require higher frequency levels tomaintain top-of-mind awareness.• Usage cycle. Products used daily or more often need to be replaced quickly, so ahigher level of frequency is desired.• Competitive share of voice. Higher frequency levels are required when a lot of competitive noise exists and when the goal is to meet or beat competitors.• Target group. The ability of the target group to learn and to retain messages has adirect effect on frequency.
  • Message complexity. The simpler the message, the less frequency required.• Message uniqueness. The more unique the message, the lower the frequency levelrequired.• New versus continuing campaigns. New campaigns require higher levels offrequency to register the message.• Image versus product sell. Creating an image requires higher levels of frequencythan does a specific product sell.• Message variation. A single message requires less frequency; a variety of messagesrequires more.• Wearout. Higher frequency may lead to wearout. This effect must be tracked and used to evaluate frequency levels.• Advertising units. Larger units of advertising require less frequency than smaller onesto get the message across.
  • Clutter. The more advertising that appears in the media used, the more frequency isneeded to break through the clutter.• Editorial environment. The more consistent the ad is with the editorial environment, the less frequency is needed.• Attentiveness. The higher the level of attention achieved by the media vehicle, the less frequency is required. Low-attention-getting media require more repetitions.• Scheduling. Continuous scheduling requires less frequency than does flighting or pulsing.• Number of media used. The fewer media used, the lower the level of frequency required.• Repeat exposures. Media that allow for more repeat exposures (for example, monthly magazines) require less frequency.
  • The absolute cost of the medium or vehicle is the actual total cost required to place the message. Forexample, a full-page four-color ad in Newsweek magazine costs about $183,000. Relativecost refers to the relationship between the price paid for advertising time or spaceand the size of the audience delivered; it is used to compare media vehicles
  • Media planning & strategy

    1. 1. MEDIA PLANNING & STRATEGY MOHD NAYAB MBA IB III SEM ROLL NO-13
    2. 2. MEDIA TERMINOLOGY  Media planning : series of decisions involved in delivering the promotional message to the prospective purchasers and/or users of the product or brand.  Media Objectives : Goals to be attained by the media strategy and program.  Media Strategy : Decisions on how the media objectives can be attained.  Media : The various categories of delivery systems, including broadcast and print media.
    3. 3. MEDIA TERMINOLOGY  Media Vehicle : The specific message carrier, such as The Hindu or Times of India.  Coverage :The potential audience that might receive the message through the vehicle. TV Homes/Households Using Television  Reach :The actual number of individual audience members reached at least once by the vehicle.  Frequency :The number of times the receiver is exposed to vehicle in a specific time period.
    4. 4. Activities involved in developing the media plan The situation analysis The marketing strategy plan The creative strategy plan Setting media objectives Determining media strategy Selecting broad media classes Media use decisions— Broadcast Print Other media Selecting media within classes
    5. 5. Developing and Implementing Media Strategies  The media mix  Target market coverage  Geographic coverage  Scheduling  Reach versus frequency  Creative aspects and mood  Flexibility  Budget considerations
    6. 6. Target Market Coverage Target Market Proportion Full Market Coverage Population excluding target market Population excluding target market Target market Media Coverage Partial Market Coverage Coverage Exceeding Market Population excluding target market Population excluding target market Media Coverage Media Coverage Media Over exposure
    7. 7. Geographic coverage  Brand development Index (BDI) = Percentage of brand to total (country) sales in the market X 100 Percentage of total (country) population in the market  Category development index (CDI) = Percentage of product category total (country) sales in the market X 100 Percentage of total (country) population in the market
    8. 8. Scheduling
    9. 9. Reach versus frequency  Reach -The actual number of individual audience members reached at least once by the vehicle.  Frequency -The number of times the receiver is exposed to vehicle in a specific time period.  GRP (Gross rating point) = Reach x frequency
    10. 10. Reach and Frequency Spot run Home A 1st time X Home Home Home Total B C D Exposures X 2 2nd time X X 2 X 1 X X 3 3 3 8 3rd time 4th time X Total Exp. 2 0
    11. 11. Reach and Frequency  Four television homes = universe.  Three homes or 75% of universe receive message. That’s a rating of 75.  In total, the message had 8 exposures.
    12. 12. Reach and Frequency 3 8 exposures divided by number of homes hit = exposures. 8 exposures = 2.67 average exposures 3 homes  Reach times frequency equals gross ratings points:  75 rating (3 homes hit in universe of 4) times 2.67 exposures = 200.25 gross rating points. 
    13. 13. Graph of Effective Reach 25% Ineffective Reach Percentage Reach 20% Effective Reach 15% Ineffective Reach 10% 5% 0% 0 5 10 Exposures 15
    14. 14. Graph of Effective Reach 25% Ineffective Reach Percentage Reach 20% Effective Reach 15% Ineffective Reach 10% 5% 0% 0 5 10 Exposures 15
    15. 15. Graph of Effective Reach 25% Ineffective Reach Percentage Reach 20% Effective Reach 15% Ineffective Reach 10% 5% 0% 0 5 10 Exposures 15
    16. 16. Graph of Effective Reach 25% Ineffective Reach Percentage Reach 20% Effective Reach 15% Ineffective Reach 10% 5% 0% 0 5 10 Exposures 15
    17. 17. Graph of Effective Reach 25% Ineffective Reach Percentage Reach 20% Effective Reach 15% Ineffective Reach 10% 5% 0% 0 5 10 Exposures 15
    18. 18. Marketing Factors Important in determining Frequency  Brand history  Brand share  Brand loyalty  Purchase cycles  Usage cycle  Competitive share of voice  Target group
    19. 19. Creative Factors In determining Frequency  Message complexity  Message uniqueness  New vs. continuing campaigns  Image versus product sell  Message variation  Wearout  Advertising units
    20. 20. Media Factors Important in determining Frequency  Clutter  Editorial environment  Attentiveness  Scheduling  Number of media used  Repeat Exposures
    21. 21. Creative aspects and mood Flexibility
    22. 22. Budget Considerations  Absolute cost example, a full-page four-color ad in Newsweek magazine costs about $183,000.  Relative cost
    23. 23. Determining Relative Costs of Media  Cost per thousand (CPM):  CPM = Cost of ad space (absolute cost) × 1,000 Circulation
    24. 24.  Cost per ratings point (CPRP)  CPRP = Cost of commercial time Program rating
    25. 25.  Daily inch rate : For newspapers, cost effectiveness is based on the daily inch rate, which is the cost per column inch of the paper  TV ------ Cost of 1 unit of time × 1,000 Program rating  Newspapers-----Cost of ad space × 1,000 Circulation
    26. 26. THANK YOU …

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