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1. 10 site analysis

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I am just checking this out to see if it is a good way to get my lectures to students.

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1. 10 site analysis

  1. 1. Attendance <br /> Attendance is required<br /> Attendance is 15% <br />You will place YOUR 3x5” card in the orange buckets with your answer at the end of lecture. <br />It is an Honor Code Violation to submit another student’s card. <br />A true friend would not ask you to risk a 7 credit “F” that can not be removed from your transcript; or worse yet, dismissal from the college. <br />1<br />
  2. 2. Welcome to the Site Global<br />2<br /> and those of you <br />from LCC <br />as well<br />
  3. 3. Hi, I’m Professor Allen<br />I graduated from the University of Michigan in 1971 with a degree in landscape architecture. <br />3<br />See, <br />I have <br />a <br />ring <br />to prove <br />It…<br />also as a reminder because, it was a long time ago..<br />
  4. 4. Around 1973 I started teaching at LIT, Lawrence Institute of Technology. Now it is known as LTU; Lawrence Technological University. <br />4<br />that's me<br />
  5. 5. 5<br />I “sat” for the registration exam around 75 -76and passed<br />
  6. 6. I became a partner in a landscape architectural firm located in Bloomfield Hills about ’78. <br />6<br />
  7. 7. And,<br /> I am still practicing in the profession…<br />7<br />
  8. 8. The world is “shrinking”; <br />Resources are being depleted at an ever increasing rate<br />while the population increases placing additional demands on the finite resource base. <br />8<br />The architecture of today must do more with less<br />
  9. 9. “power oriented solutions tend to add even more energy and yet another layer of construction to solve yet another layer of construction to solve each problem that that arises in the context of building design. This approach characterizes building production in the second half of the twentieth century. During this period, buildings became hermetically sealed, relied upon an increasing layered approach to construction, and used increasing amounts of energy to serve their occupants.” pp 7 kiel moe<br />9<br />
  10. 10. I will use SITE ANALYSIS <br />as the structure for these lectures…<br />a kind of roadmap;<br />a backbone upon which I will <br />hang topics.<br />10<br />Because, it is through <br />an understanding of the site & <br />natural systems, that we will be able<br />to minimize the impact we make <br />on the environment. <br />
  11. 11. YOU <br />DESIGN <br />STRUCTURE<br />FOR A SPECIFIC PLACE, <br />A SITE<br />11<br />
  12. 12. That is the “Why” of Site Analysis?<br />All sites are not created equal; <br />or flat….<br />Nor are all buildings the same. <br />Nor all clients. Nor all communities.<br />Architecture is not played on a Monopoly board.<br />12<br />
  13. 13. Face Plant:<br />ICARUS flew close to the sun <br />on wings made of feathers; <br />secured to his arms by wax...<br />13<br />The price of Ignorance<br />
  14. 14. SiteAnalysis<br />An inventory<br />kind of like dating…<br />getting to know each other…. <br />The implications of that inventory as it relates to a program…<br />Because, as an architect, you are going to propose a marriage of site and structure.<br />14<br />
  15. 15. What you should walk away with…<br />Today, <br />I will talk about site analysis in view of:<br />I. Natural Factors<br />II. Cultural Factors<br />III. Aesthetic Factors <br />15<br />
  16. 16. SITE INVENTORY CHECKLIST<br />I. Natural Features<br />1. Geological Base & Landforms<br /> 2. Topography<br /> 3. Soils <br /> 4. Hydrography (water / lakes, streams, water table, etc…) <br /> 5. Climatic Factors & Orientation <br /> 6. Vegetation<br /> 7. Wildlife<br />16<br />
  17. 17. II. Cultural Features<br />8. Zoning / Ordinances <br />9. CIRCULATION: Traffic, Transit, & Linkage<br />10. Utilities <br />11. Existing Buildings<br />12. Historic Factors<br />13. Context: Fabric<br />14. People<br />17<br />
  18. 18. III. Aesthetic Features<br />15. Natural Features<br />16. Spatial Patterns <br />17. Views and Vistas<br />17 topic areas that serve as a guide in the development of a site analysis. <br />A checklist as it were<br />18<br />
  19. 19. Site Analysis<br />Site Analysis is the combination of an inventory & program. <br />19<br />
  20. 20. For example…<br />Orientation considerations may be based on <br />5. CLIMATE : WEATHERE PATTERNS <br />9. CIRCULATION<br />&<br /> 17. VIEWS<br />DESIGN IS ALL ABOUT PRIORITIES<br />20<br />
  21. 21. Orientation andearth shelter insulation<br />Note <br />the earth<br />shelter<br />berm on NORTH elevation to minimize heat loss. <br />Note the minimal use of glass for the same reason.<br />21<br />
  22. 22. In order to practice, not just give lip service to, sustainability, you must first understand the natural systems & their cycles to maximize their potential.<br />Note the vestibule entrance to minimize energy loss. Note use of dark tile to “store” solar heat gain. <br />View to south.<br />22<br />
  23. 23. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  24. 24. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />23<br />
  25. 25. 1. Geological Base / Landforms<br />24<br />
  26. 26. Rupit Spain<br />Here, the natural<br />stone, the geological <br />base, has been<br />used to form<br />natural steps.<br />It has been<br />supplemented <br />with local <br />stone. That is good for some LEED points. <br />25<br />
  27. 27. Rupit Spain<br />Embrace the site, <br />let it embrace <br />your <br />Architecture. <br />Vernacular;<br />native to an area;<br />in character, defining the character.<br />Talk <br />About a<br />Hangover!<br />26<br />
  28. 28. It’s nothing new…<br />27<br />
  29. 29. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  30. 30. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />28<br />
  31. 31. 2. TOPOGRAPHY / LANDFORMS<br />The shape of the land:<br />29<br />
  32. 32. First, define the Land<br />We measure land. <br /> We define it as“FLAT”<br /> on the surface, <br /> with lines of LONGITUDE; <br /> pole to pole, <br /> &<br />LATITUDE; <br /> east and west. <br />30<br />
  33. 33. JUST A REMINDER<br />LATITUDE<br />LONGITUDE <br />31<br />If you Google this area, you will find that we are about 42.5 degrees N. latitude.<br />That is important as you need that to derive the altitude of the sun at any given date. <br />
  34. 34. However, not all land is flat…<br />32<br />
  35. 35. “Topo”2.Topography, the ups and downs of the land<br /> TOPOGRAPHY<br /> may be graphically<br /> represented <br /> by <br /> SPOT ELEVATIONS <br /> which may then <br /> be interpolated<br /> into CONTOURS.<br />33<br />
  36. 36. Slide from sleeping bear or Vermont<br />34<br />
  37. 37. Machu Picchu<br />Not flat…<br />How do we represent it?<br />35<br />
  38. 38. CONTOUR LINE<br />An imaginary line connecting points of equal elevation above a given datum plane… <br />We use a level to determine just what those elevations are<br />Here’s looking at you kid<br />36<br />
  39. 39. 37<br />
  40. 40. 38<br />
  41. 41. Bad Grading….<br />Why you study topo…<br />39<br />
  42. 42. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  43. 43. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />40<br />
  44. 44. 3.Soil<br />It takes hundreds years to create 1 inch of topsoil.<br />That is hundreds years to “erode” these rocks <br />into particles small enough to separate and hold<br />organic materials in place while allowing air and<br />water to reach the root systems of plants,<br />( which by the way hold this mess we call soil together) <br />and still allow some to escape to the water table <br />and aquifers so we can drink it. <br />And you thought it was just dirt. <br />41<br />
  45. 45. Soil Evolution<br />The geological base is a<br />primary source of soil.<br />Through erosion the base <br />evolves to finer particles <br />that when combined with<br />organic matter becomes<br />soil…<br />Mechanical Erosion<br />&<br />Chemical Erosion <br />Freeze thaw cycles<br /> Gravity<br /> Precipitation<br /> Wind<br /> Plants & Animals<br />42<br />
  46. 46. basalt<br />Fine grained igneous rock evolving to soil through erosion. <br />It takes hundreds of years to generate one inch of topsoil. <br />43<br />
  47. 47. Lichens <br />44<br />
  48. 48. Soil Composition<br />Clay<br />Silt<br />Sand <br />& <br />Loam (organic matter) <br />45<br />
  49. 49. SOIL COMPOSITION<br />46<br />
  50. 50. SOIL TEXTURE<br />47<br />
  51. 51. Heavy clay soils present drainage problems. <br />(they make pots out of clay!)<br />Heavy sand soils promote infiltration.<br />Heavy loam soils support plants; but not buildings.<br />(That is why we use footings.) <br />48<br />
  52. 52. SOIL EVOLUTION<br />49<br />
  53. 53. SOIL EROSION; BAD PUPU !<br />50<br />Plant materials protect the soil…<br />
  54. 54. EROSION PROTECTION<br />Soil Erosion control fencing is now required to prevent the loss of soil.<br />51<br />
  55. 55. 52<br />One QUARTER<br />
  56. 56. How much weight will this soil support?<br />53<br />
  57. 57. 54<br />
  58. 58. SOIL<br />Soil supports buildings, sometimes… <br />Soil supports the plants you eat<br />Soil supports life…<br />55<br />
  59. 59. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  60. 60. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />56<br />
  61. 61. 4. Hydrography<br />IF ALL THE EARTH’S WATER WERE TO BE REPRESENTED BY THIS GALLON OF WATER, JUST OVER A TABLESPOON WOULD BE FRESH WATER. <br />The Great lakes hold approximately 1/5 of the worlds’ fresh water.<br />Michigan is a great place.<br />Welcome aboard Spaceship Earth<br />57<br />
  62. 62. Water issues….<br />Watershed<br />Water table<br />Aquifer<br />Flood plane<br />50 year storm<br />Wetlands<br />Swamps<br />Marshes<br />Hydrological cycle<br />Precipitation <br />58<br />
  63. 63. Water-table : <br />that point below which <br />all the voids <br />between soil particles <br />are filled with <br />water. <br />59<br />
  64. 64. POWERFUL<br />60<br />Powerful<br />
  65. 65. Peaceful<br />61<br />
  66. 66. Playful<br />62<br />
  67. 67. Protected & Respected<br />63<br />
  68. 68. “Those who refuse to learn fromhistory are condemned to relive it.” AUGUST 30, 2005<br />64<br />
  69. 69. Flood Plains<br />65<br />
  70. 70. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  71. 71. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />66<br />
  72. 72. 5. CLIMATIC FACTORS<br /> Climate is determined <br /> by your location relative <br /> to the sun among other <br /> things;<br /> It is kind of an average <br /> of the weather<br /> Weather is day to day <br /> change<br />67<br />
  73. 73. Weather<br />All these phenomenon taken together are what makes up our weather. <br />When we talk of weather, we are talking about<br />Sun (light and temperature)<br />Wind<br />& <br />Precipitation<br />68<br />
  74. 74. 23.5 degrees; marvelous <br />The wonderful thing about earth is that it is tilted 23.5 degrees on its’ axis. <br />That is why we have different climates and changing seasons. <br />69<br />
  75. 75. 23½º<br />Beautiful<br />Plan <br />for <br />It<br />!<br />70<br />231/2<br />
  76. 76. That 23.5˚ keeps the weather changing through 4 seasons in Michigan; spring summer, <br />fall, <br />& <br />winter.<br />Fall Equinox<br />September 21 / 22<br />Spring Equinox<br />March 21/22<br />Summer Solstice<br />June 21 / 22<br />Winter Solstice<br />December 21 / 22<br />71<br />
  77. 77. For example it is typical that frost will extend to 42 inches on very rare occasions in this area; therefore it is a good idea to extend your footings to at least that depth.<br />I usually analyze the micro climate; the climate or weather that is typical to the area of the site under consideration.<br />72<br />
  78. 78. Weather shot<br />73<br />
  79. 79. 4 seasons as a result<br />74<br />
  80. 80. Note just where the sun hits the planet perpendicular…<br />75<br />
  81. 81. WIND<br />Prevailing winter winds<br />Prevailing summer winds <br />76<br />
  82. 82. conclusion<br />Doors & windows facing south is generally a good thing<br />Buffering and minimizing exposure from the north is generally a good thing<br />77<br />
  83. 83. PRECIPITATION <br />Need altitude of sun<br />78<br />
  84. 84. Falling Water<br />79<br />
  85. 85. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  86. 86. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />80<br />
  87. 87. 6.VEGETATION<br />81<br />
  88. 88. Trees<br />Trees are large and generate shade and block the wind…<br />They are worth working around as they clean the air.<br />Carbon Offsets…<br />Remember.<br />82<br />
  89. 89. Add some shrubs & groundcovers… <br />Trees, shrubs and groundcovers. <br />Either a KEY or notation would be appropriate at this stage…<br />83<br />
  90. 90. Another perspective…<br />84<br />
  91. 91. More about plants…consider….<br />85<br />
  92. 92. Yearly Change<br />86<br />
  93. 93. Seasonal Change<br />87<br />
  94. 94. Indigenous<br />Red Maple<br />ExoticMonkey Tree<br />88<br />
  95. 95. Maintenance Free<br />Tree<br />Flower<br />89<br />
  96. 96. SITE ANALYSIS<br />NATURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li> 1. Geological Base & Landforms
  97. 97. 2. Topography </li></ul>maps, slope analysis, reading topography, contours, spot elevations, conventions, drainage<br /><ul><li> 3. Soils </li></ul>classification of types, texture, and characteristics ( most of lower Michigan is composed of Brown earths and Podzols)<br /><ul><li> 4. Hydrography</li></ul> streams, lakes, swamps, water table, flood plain, watershed, aquifer, surface drainage<br /><ul><li> 5. Climatic Factors </li></ul>sun, wind, and precipitation / orientation to, comfort envelope / orientation<br /><ul><li> 6. Vegetation</li></ul>trees, shrubs, vines, and ground covers <br /><ul><li> 7. Wildlife</li></ul>those little and big critters that live and pass through & over the area.<br />90<br />
  98. 98. 7. WILD LIFE<br />91<br />
  99. 99. Respect<br />92<br />HALF WAY<br />
  100. 100. KEY<br />Ducks (duck dudu)<br />Geese (goose Poop)<br />Swans (attack boaters)<br />Turtles<br />Muskrats<br />Fish<br />Deer<br />Muskrat <br />Fox<br />Coyote<br />93<br />
  101. 101. 94<br />GONE NOW !<br />
  102. 102. 95<br />
  103. 103. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  104. 104. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />96<br />
  105. 105. Zoning dictates many<br />aspects of Land Use &<br />architectural design.<br />Side yard set backs<br />Front yard set backs<br />Rear yard set backs<br />Height limits<br />Land use<br />Landscape requirements <br /> & <br />The like <br />8. ZONING<br />97<br />
  106. 106. Zoning indicates what type of land use is allowed. <br />Here the yellow color designates that this property is zoned R – 1A; Single Family Residential.<br />98<br />
  107. 107. Zoning Dictates; <br />Side yard setbacks.<br />Rear and Front yard setbacks.<br />This results in the building envelope being defined. <br />Add height limits and we have a 3-D box to “fill”<br />99<br />
  108. 108. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  109. 109. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />100<br />
  110. 110. 9. CIRCULATION<br />101<br />
  111. 111. 102<br />
  112. 112. It’s<br />all <br />about <br />getting <br />there<br />103<br />
  113. 113. the surfaces we walk on<br />104<br />
  114. 114. To the transitions we make<br />105<br />
  115. 115. & the access we provide…<br />106<br />
  116. 116. 107<br />
  117. 117. Getting <br />there <br />is <br />half <br />the <br />fun<br />Plan for it…<br />108<br />
  118. 118. PROVIDE FOR IT<br />109<br />
  119. 119. Mass transit <br />110<br />
  120. 120. Conflict Transition ?<br />111<br />
  121. 121. 112<br />
  122. 122. How about airplane auto conflict?<br />113<br />
  123. 123. Site Circulation<br />114<br />
  124. 124. 115<br />
  125. 125. BUT THAT IS JUST AN INVENTORY<br /> WHEN YOU NOTE THE FLOW & THE CONFLICTS; YOU ARE STARTING AN ANALYSIS<br />116<br />
  126. 126. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  127. 127. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />117<br />
  128. 128. 10. UTILITIESBelow ground<br />Men at work <br />Bad Utility; trip and fall utility.<br />118<br />
  129. 129. Above ground utilities<br />Electric<br />Cable<br />Telephone<br />119<br />
  130. 130. Behind the scenes<br />120<br />
  131. 131. 72 hours, 3 working days, before you dig, call Miss Dig <br /> Electric & Cable<br /> Gas <br /> Sewer<br /> Water<br />121<br />
  132. 132. LIGHTING<br />122<br />
  133. 133. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  134. 134. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />123<br />
  135. 135. PIKU HOUSE,<br /> MICHIGAN<br />11. EXISTING BUILDINGS<br />124<br />
  136. 136. FallingwaterBear Run, Pa.<br />125<br />
  137. 137. embrace the site..<br />gently<br />126<br />
  138. 138. 127<br />
  139. 139. Street side<br />128<br />
  140. 140. Lake Side<br />129<br />
  141. 141. Now add the buildings east and west…<br />And things start to look a little crowded…<br />130<br />
  142. 142. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  143. 143. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />131<br />
  144. 144. 12. HISTORIC FACTORS<br />132<br />
  145. 145. 133<br />
  146. 146. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  147. 147. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />134<br />
  148. 148. 1. URBAN<br />2. SUBURBAN<br />3. RURAL ?<br />4. WILDERNESS<br />13. CONTEXT: THE FABRIC<br />135<br />
  149. 149. NYC<br />136<br />
  150. 150. London<br />137<br />
  151. 151. Florence<br />138<br />3/4<br />
  152. 152. Spain<br />Rural fabric? <br />Suburban? <br />Urban? <br />139<br />
  153. 153. Suburban Fabric?<br />Nice texture…<br />140<br />
  154. 154. Wilderness ?<br />We are drawn to it..<br />141<br />
  155. 155. Dow House<br />Midland, Michigan<br />142<br />
  156. 156. 143<br />
  157. 157. II. CULTURAL FACTORS<br /><ul><li>8. Zoning / Ordinances </li></ul>ownership, restrictions, density ratio, deed restrictions, permits, height restrictions<br /><ul><li> 9. Traffic and Transit , Linkage and Circulation </li></ul>pedestrian, vehicular, relationships, interface, noise<br /><ul><li> 10. Utilities </li></ul>storm sewer, sanitary sewer, water, electric, telephone, cable, gas, below and above ground<br /><ul><li> 11. Existing Buildings</li></ul>on and off site, character and composition<br /><ul><li> 12. Historic Factors
  158. 158. 13. Context: </li></ul>Fabric; Urban, Suburban & Rural<br /><ul><li> 14. People</li></ul>Noise, congestion, pollution<br />144<br />
  159. 159. 14. PEOPLE<br />Celebrate <br />the <br />little <br />people<br />.<br />.<br />. <br />145<br />
  160. 160. Architecture can create a dialogue with people…<br />146<br />
  161. 161. It's all about people<br />147<br />
  162. 162. 148<br />
  163. 163. Plan for all people<br />149<br />
  164. 164. III. AESTHETIC FEATURES<br /><ul><li> 15. Natural Features unique landforms or elements
  165. 165. 16. Spatial Patterns </li></ul>voids and masses created by structures or natural elements<br /><ul><li> 17. Views and Vistas</li></ul>150<br />
  166. 166. 15. NATURAL FEATURES<br />151<br />
  167. 167. 152<br />
  168. 168. 153<br />
  169. 169. RUPIT FALLSSPAIN<br />154<br />
  170. 170. III. AESTHETIC FEATURES<br /><ul><li> 15. Natural Features unique landforms or elements
  171. 171. 16. Spatial Patterns </li></ul>voids and masses created by structures or natural elements<br /><ul><li> 17. Views and Vistas</li></ul>155<br />
  172. 172. 16. SPATIAL PATTERN<br />156<br />
  173. 173. 157<br />
  174. 174. To a quiet space<br />158<br />
  175. 175. 159<br />
  176. 176. Piazza San Marco<br />160<br />
  177. 177. 161<br />
  178. 178. 162<br />
  179. 179. 163<br />
  180. 180. wilderness…<br />164<br />
  181. 181. III. AESTHETIC FEATURES<br /><ul><li> 15. Natural Features unique landforms or elements
  182. 182. 16. Spatial Patterns </li></ul>voids and masses created by structures or natural elements<br /><ul><li> 17. Views and Vistas</li></ul>165<br />
  183. 183. 17. VIEWS<br />166<br />
  184. 184. 167<br />
  185. 185. View through & to<br />168<br />
  186. 186. Framed View<br />◄ Sagrada Familia <br /> As viewed from the roof of Casa Milà<br />169<br />Photo by professor Ralph N.<br />
  187. 187. View to<br />170<br />
  188. 188. Thikn !<br />171<br />
  189. 189. 172<br />REMEMBER<br />
  190. 190. The End<br />173<br />
  191. 191. BEN FRANKLIN<br />Dost thou love life? Then do not squander time, for that the stuff life is made of. <br /> <br />Employ thy time well, if thou meanest to gain leisure.<br /> <br />Remember that time is money.<br /> <br />Waste neither time nor money, but make the best use of both.<br /> <br />Leisure is the time for doing something useful.<br /> <br />Take time for all things: great haste makes great waste.<br /> <br />174<br />
  192. 192. starting with DECEMBER<br />A YEAR OF SUN AT NOON <br />175<br />
  193. 193. Equinox<br />176<br />
  194. 194. Winter Solstice<br />177<br />
  195. 195. Summer Solstice <br />178<br />
  196. 196. “Mental notes are now worth the paper they are written on.”<br />Mark Twain<br />179<br />
  197. 197. “Architecturally <br />this is the most <br />fascinating part of <br />the whole complex,<br />much of the interest<br />being derived from<br />the ingenious and<br />evocative blending<br />of natural & <br />architectural forms.” <br />pp 42 Jacobs<br />San Juan de la Peña<br />180<br />
  198. 198. I can Google it <br />I can trace it…<br />It shows the major circulation paths and starts to give me a feeling for the area… <br />Download GOOGLE!<br />181<br />
  199. 199. How does nature define regions?<br />Nature defines regions by ridges and valleys, oceans and continents<br />Today we define regions by the grid…<br /> an artificial grid.<br />Who has it right? <br />182<br />
  200. 200. HURON RIVER WATERSHED<br />183<br />
  201. 201. “The major <br />Flooding witnessed <br />in many English towns<br /> & cities in 2000 and 2001 <br />has been attributed, in part, <br /> to increased built development <br />in river catchments and flood <br />plains and the consequent <br />disruption to natural <br />drainage patterns.”<br />Dunnett and Kingsbury <br />184<br />
  202. 202. How plants benefit us….<br />Food <br />Protection / Shelter<br />Clothing<br />Climate modification<br />Clean atmosphere<br />Building materials, renewable resource<br />Medicine<br />Wildlife Habitat<br />Storm water management<br />185<br />
  203. 203. 186<br />
  204. 204. I took this picture while flying; not a wise thing to do.<br />187<br />

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