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Parliamentary Government

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A PowerPoint that describes the key features of a parliamentary
system and presidential system

Publicada em: Educação
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Parliamentary Government

  1. 1. Parliamentary Government
  2. 2. Learning Objectives • To understand the key features of a parliamentary system and presidential system • To evaluate to what extent the UK is becoming more presidential • To identify different theories of parliamentary government
  3. 3. A Parliamentary System of Government
  4. 4. A Presidential System of Government
  5. 5. Key Features of a Parliamentary System Fusion of powers Governments formed through parliamentary elections Overlap of personnel Government removable by legislature Flexible-term elections Cabinet government Separate head of government and head of state
  6. 6. Vote of No Confidence • Typically, when a parliament passes a vote of no confidence in an existing government, the head of state must respond in one of two ways: - ask another individual, whom he or she believes will command the confidence of parliament, to try to form a government - dissolve the elected parliament and call a general election to elect a new parliament Spotlight on… A parliamentary motion whose passing would demonstrate to the head of state that the elected parliament no longer has confidence in the appointed government.
  7. 7. Vote of No Confidence Spotlight on… • The 1979 vote of no confidence in the government of James Callaghan was a vote of no confidence in the British Labour Government of James Callaghan which occurred on the 28 March 1979. • The vote was brought by opposition leader Margaret Thatcher and was lost by the Labour Government by one vote—311 votes to 310— forcing a general election which led to the election of Margaret Thatcher. In 2009 the proposed vote of no confidence in the Speaker of the House of Commons forced the resignation of Michael Martin.
  8. 8. TASK: You will be given either a feature of parliamentary government or a feature of presidential government. You need to find out what it is and prepare a post it note to help you explain the concept to the class. Feature of Parliamentary Government Feature of Presidential Government Fusion of powers Separation of powers Governments formed through parliamentary elections Governments are separately elected Overlap of personnel Separation of personnel Government removable by legislature Legislature cannot remove government Flexible-term elections Fixed Term elections Cabinet government Presidentialism Separate head of government and head of state President is both head of state and government You only have 5 minutes to prepare!
  9. 9. Fixed Term Elections Spotlight on… • 5th July 2011 - Nick Clegg announced plans for fixed - term Parliaments, in which the govt. could be removed by a 2/3 majority of the House of Commons - thus forcing a general election before the date of the next election • Fixed-term Parliaments Bill received Royal Assent on 15.09.11. A vote of no confidence in a PM would still just require a simple majority.
  10. 10. To what extent has the UK system become more presidential? Key Question COMPLETELY PARLIAMENTARY COMPLETELY PRESIDENTIAL LARGE EXTENT PARLIAMENTARY LARGE EXTENT PRESIDENTIAL SMALL EXTENT PRESIDENTIAL SMALL EXTENT PARLIAMENTARY
  11. 11. To what extent has the UK system become more presidential? INSTRUCTIONS • Tick all of the features that apply to the UK system of government in both columns. • Look at how the features of the UK system are split between the columns – this should give you a visual illustration of the extent to which the UK system has become presidential. To help you reach a judgement on how presidential the UK system of government is, you are going to use a checklist. If you get stuck or do not understand the feature listed, visit the student expert who explained the concept to the class.
  12. 12. To what extent has the UK system become more presidential?
  13. 13. Parliament and Government Government • The government runs the country and has responsibility for developing & implementing policy and for drafting laws. It is also known as the Executive. Parliament • Parliament is the highest legislative authority in the UK. It has responsibility for checking the work of government and examining, debating & approving new laws. Spotlight on… Parliament and government both play a part in forming the laws of the United Kingdom. They are separate institutions that work closely together, so it's easy to mix-up exactly what each one is responsible for.
  14. 14. Theories of Parliamentary Power There are 3 interpretations of parliamentary power; The Westminster Model The Whitehall Model The Transformative Model
  15. 15. Theories of Parliamentary Power TRANSFOR- MATIVE MODEL Parliament = no longer policy making body Parliament ≠ irrelevant Parliament = transform policy (reacting to executive initiatives) WHITEHALL MODEL Executive = political + constitutional power Parliament = rubber stamp (no meaningful policy influence) WESTMINSTER MODEL Parliament = representative government + responsible government Parliament = significant policy influence
  16. 16. Theories of Parliamentary Power Which interpretation of parliamentary power do you think is most accurate and why?
  17. 17. To what extent has the UK system become more presidential? Key Question COMPLETELY PARLIAMENTARY COMPLETELY PRESIDENTIAL LARGE EXTENT PARLIAMENTARY LARGE EXTENT PRESIDENTIAL SMALL EXTENT PRESIDENTIAL SMALL EXTENT PARLIAMENTARY Write your name on a post it and put it on the presidential thermometer – prepare to justify your decision!
  18. 18. Ministers & MPs Spotlight on… Government ministers are chosen from MPs and Lords in Parliament. Your MP may be a member of the party forming the current Government, but it doesn't necessarily mean they are working 'in government'. Ministers must regularly respond to oral and written questions from MPs and Lords.
  19. 19. Homework

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