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The Puzzles Librarians Need to Solve - Vala 2016

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Lee Rainie, director of Internet, Science and Technology research at Pew Research Center, will describe how the Center’s research provides guideposts for librarians along three dimensions of library activity: the people, the place, and the platform, at the VALA2016 conference in Melbourne, Australia.

Publicada em: Educação, Internet

The Puzzles Librarians Need to Solve - Vala 2016

  1. 1. The Puzzles Librarians Need to Solve Lee Rainie Director – Internet, Science and Technology Research February 9, 2016 VALA - Melbourne @lrainie | @pewinternet | @pewresearch
  2. 2. Your 6 big puzzles to solve 1. What’s the future of personal enrichment and entertainment? 2. What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3. What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4. What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5. What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)?
  3. 3. Q6: Where do you fit on the continuum? ALA’s “Confronting the Future” Totally physical (facilities and media) Individual focus Collection library (physical and virtual) Archive Everything for everyone Totally virtual (facilities and media) Community focus Creation library (social, maker space) Portal Specialized niche
  4. 4. Starting point: Your foundation is pretty solid
  5. 5. Our previous findings libraries.pewinternet.org • People think libraries are important, especially for communities • People like and trust librarians • People think libraries level of the playing field for those without vast resources • People think libraries provide services that are hard to get elsewhere • People believe libraries have rebranded themselves as tech hubs
  6. 6. http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/03/13/library-engagement-typology/ Capstone: Library User (and Non-User) Typology
  7. 7. Q1: What is the future of knowledge?
  8. 8. • How is it created? New scientific method (and citizen scientists) … Big data … Niches and argument … Simulations and models • What are its interfaces? New displays … Networked data/info … Gamified environments • How is it disseminated? Social networks and media … Flipped schools
  9. 9. Learning as identity (% of those ages 18+) 58 61 73 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 I often find myself looking for new opportunities to grow as a person I like to gather as much information as I can when I come across something that I am not familiar with I think of myself as a lifelong learner Describes me very well
  10. 10. 74% of all adults are personal enrichment learners % of those ages 18+ 16 25 30 35 58 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Taken online course Taken course related to interest/hobby Attend convention/conference tied to personal interest Attended meeting where learned new info such as book club or arts club Read publications related to personal interest
  11. 11. The motives of personal learners % of those ages 18+ 33 36 60 64 80 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 Learn something to help with my children's or other kids school work Wanted to turn a hobby into extra income Extra time on my hands Learn something that would allow me to help others Learn something make my life more interesting
  12. 12. 63% of the employed are work-related learners – i.e. gotten training or taken courses (% of those ages 18+) 7 13 24 36 55 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Because I am worried about losing job To help get a new job To help get a raise/promotion For a license or certification for my job To maintain or improve my job skills
  13. 13. Q2: What is the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)?
  14. 14. What is the future of learning? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities” New: Learning as a process Knowledge is objective and certain Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is subjective and provisional
  15. 15. New: Learning as a process Learners receive knowledge Old: Learning as transaction Learners create knowledge What is the future of learning? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities”
  16. 16. New: Learning as a process Knowledge is organized in stable, hierarchical structures that can be treated independently of one another Old: Learning as transaction Knowledge is organized “ecologically”- disciplines are integrative and interactive What is the future of learning? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities”
  17. 17. New: Learning as a process We learn best passively, by listening and watching Old: Learning as transaction We learn best actively doing and managing our own learning What is the future of learning? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities”
  18. 18. New: Learning as a process Our “intelligence” is based on our individual abilities Old: Learning as transaction Our “intelligence” is based on our networks What is the future of learning? -- Shana Ratner (1997) “Emerging Issues in Learning Communities”
  19. 19. How do you search for information? Bigger, better search for everything … New interfaces …“Semantic web” … Bots … Predictive analytics How do you aggregate / curate it? Key attribute of a helpful network “node” … “Do what you do best and link to the rest” What new literacies are required to understand it? Searching … Evaluating … Pattern recognition and critical thinking … Coding and media production skills
  20. 20. Q3: What is the future of public technology and community anchor institutions?
  21. 21. 22 Libraries stack up well vs. others How confident? How important? 63 28 Library to community
  22. 22. Should libraries move some print books and stacks OUT OF public locations to free up more space for things such as tech centers, reading rooms, meetings rooms, and cultural events? % of those ages 16+ 30 40 25 20 39 36 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do Nov-12 Apr-15
  23. 23. February 5, 2016 24www.pewresearch.org The clear public mandate: Do something for education …. Large majorities of Americans see libraries as part of the educational ecosystem and as resources for promoting digital and information literacy.
  24. 24. Should libraries coordinate more closely with local schools in providing resources to kids? % of those ages 16+ 85 11 2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do
  25. 25. 85 12 2 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do Should libraries offer free early literacy programs to help young children prepare for school? % of those ages 16+
  26. 26. Should libraries offer programs to teach people, including kids and senior citizens, how to use digital tools such as computers, smartphones and apps? % of those ages 16+ 78 16 3 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do
  27. 27. How well, if at all, do your local public libraries serve the learning and educational needs of your local community – not just children at schools, but all those of any age who want to learn? % of those ages 18+ 37 39 6 4 12 0 20 40 60 80 100 Very well Pretty well Not too well Not well at all Don't know
  28. 28. How well, if at all, do your local public libraries serve the learning and educational needs of you and your family? (% of those ages 18+) 34 36 9 12 8 0 20 40 60 80 100 Very well Pretty well Not too well Not well at all Don't know
  29. 29. Q4: What is the future of learning spaces?
  30. 30. Where personal learners did their learning (% of adults who did personal learning in past 12 months) 52 35 29 26 23 31 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 On the internet At educational facility At a community center or museum At a church, temple, or synagogue At a library At some other place
  31. 31. Where professional learners got their training (% of employed who got job training in past 12 months) 75 55 48 43 37 21 9 14 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 At your workplace On the internet At offsite facility At a convention, conference At home At a government agency At a library Some other place
  32. 32. New kinds of enrichment/entertainment are networked and aimed at networked individuals • Can be DIY and self-paced • Can be experiential, participatory • Can be just-in time, real time • Can draw on peers and their networks • Can be place-agnostic • Can exploit augmented reality • Can have gaming sensibilities • Can exploit feedback and analytics
  33. 33. Should libraries offer programs to teach patrons about protecting their privacy and security online? % of those ages 16+ 76 18 4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do
  34. 34. Should libraries have more comfortable spaces for reading, working, and relaxing at the library? % of those ages 16+ 64 25 7 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 Should definitely do Should maybe do Should definitely not do
  35. 35. Q5: What is the future of attention?
  36. 36. STREAMS: USER SPENDS HER LUNCH BREAK DIPPING INTO A VARIETY OF MEDIA “STREAMS”
  37. 37. How it works • Motive – catching up / checking in / curiosity • Content – news (broad definition), social updates • Demographics – tilts under 35 / female • Device – any / all • Engagement – continuous partial attention / horizontal scans / sharing • Influentials – editors, social networks • ~ Mindshare – quarter to a third of media time
  38. 38. SIGNALS: USER HAS SET UP ALERTS ON HER SMARTPHONE AND REGULARLY CHECKS HER HOME SCREEN TO SEE NEWS HEADLINES
  39. 39. How it works • Motive – real-time awareness • Content – headlines, new information, first impressions matter most • Demographics – under 30, tilts women • Device – smartphone, tablet • Engagement – glancing OR galvanized • Influentials – brands • ~ Mindshare – < 5% of media time
  40. 40. SNACKS: USER ACCESSES HER MOBILE DEVICE WHEN SHE HAS A SMALL AMOUNT OF TIME TO KILL
  41. 41. How it works • Motive – killing time, beating boredom • Content – gameified, bite-size headlines, link- dense • Demographics – Everyone gets something different • Device – smartphone • Engagement – distracted, quick-twitch • Influentials – brands, quality of social network • ~ Mindshare – 5%-10% of media time
  42. 42. People: Serve and Learn – Tech experts – Master teachers in age of lifelong learning – Visionaries for the knowledge economy and the jobs it produces – Experts in sense- making, context, and curation – Monitors of algorithms
  43. 43. Place: Reconfigured and Repurposed – Artifacts are connected and data-rich – Nodes for “system of systems” with databases and media – Test beds – maker masters – Community information and media stewards
  44. 44. Platform: Community Resource – Trusted institution and privacy watchdog – Advocates for free and open – Advocates for closing digital divides – Data and collections repositories – Civic specialists – esp. in learning realms
  45. 45. Examples of market and cultural shortcomings librarians are addressing – or could address 1) Technology non-users - skills training in new literacies 2) Pre-school programs 3) After school activities 4) English as a second language courses 5) Lifelong learning opportunities / credentialing competency 6) Fill gaps in local media ecosystem – community and civic information/curation 7) Help for small business / entrepreneurs / non- profits 8) Serendipity agents of discovery
  46. 46. Be not afraid
  47. 47. Extra material Pew Research Center archive of library-related research: Libraries.pewinternet.org
  48. 48. Q1: What is the future of knowledge? • How is it created? • What are its interfaces? • How is it disseminated? Homework: Too Big To Know David Weinberger
  49. 49. Q2: What is the future of reference expertise? How do you search for information? How do you aggregate / curate it? What new literacies are required to understand it? Homework: http://searchengineland.com/ Danny Sullivan & Co.
  50. 50. Q3: What is the future of public technology What is the future of knowledge access points? What divides persist / emerge? What lending models are enabled in a new era of property / subscription / sharing? Homework: Confronting the Future: Strategic Visions for the 21st Century Public Library Roger Levien
  51. 51. Q4: What is the future of learning spaces What fosters collaboration? Creativity? Problem solving? What is the role of solitude and quiet spaces? What other alliances can you strike with institutions that share your goals about providing key information to your community? Homework: A New Culture of Learning Douglas Thomas & John Seely Brown
  52. 52. Q5: What is the future of community anchor institutions Does local matter? What does our community need? Homework: Informing Communities: Sustaining Democracy in the Digital Age Knight Commission on the Information Needs of Communities
  53. 53. Q6: What’s the franchise? What’s the commodity? Homework: The Innovators Dilemma The Innovators Solution Clayton Christensen, Michael Raynor What Would Google Do? Jeff Jarvis

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