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Networked Worlds and
Networked Enterprises
Lee Rainie - @lrainie
Director, Pew Research Center’s Internet Project
To: KMWo...
“Tell the truth, and trust the people”
-- Joseph N. Pew, Jr.
http://bit.ly/dUvWe3
http://bit.ly/100qMub
Networked life in organizations:
A four-part harmony

1.
2.
3.
4.

Networked individuals
Networked information
Networked w...
Networked life in organizations:
A four-part harmony

1.
2.
3.
4.

Networked individuals
Networked information
Networked w...
Networked Individualism
The move to looser, far-flung networks
Personal networks are:
More important – trust, influence awareness
Differently composed – segmented, layered
Perform new f...
But it is not just technological story
Other drivers are changes in …
Family life
Business structures & labor shifts
Trans...
People Function as Networked Individuals and less
as group members
• Social ties and events organized
around the individua...
Networked life in organizations:
A four-part harmony

1.
2.
3.
4.

Networked individuals
Networked information
Networked w...
Digital Revolution 1: Broadband at home - 70% (+10% more
have smartphones) - Internet users overall: 85%
Dial-up

Broadban...
Digital Revolution 2
Mobile – 91% … smartphone 56% … tablets 34%
326.4
Total U.S.
population:
319 million

2012
Changes in smartphone ownership
80%
May 2011

February 2012

May 2013

56%

60%

46%

48%

41%
40%

35%

35%

17%

20%

12...
Digital Revolution 3
Social networking – 61% of all adults
18-29
100%

30-49

50-64

65+

% of internet users

89%
78%

80...
The Landscape of Social Media Users (among adults)
% of internet
users who….

Use Any Social
Networking Site
Use Facebook
...
The nature of networked information

•
•
•
•
•

Pervasively generated
Pervasively consumed
Personal via new filters
Partic...
Networked life in organizations:
A four-part harmony

1.
2.
3.
4.

Networked individuals
Networked information
Networked w...
Networked Work
• Not one small bounded group in a
hierarchy … simultaneous work in
multiple teams
• Multidisciplinary
• Di...
Traditional “fishbowl” vs. Networked “switchboard”
• All work in same room
• Densely-knit, direct
connections
• Most inter...
Networked work: Balance sheet
•
•

•
•
•

Advantages
Surfaces extra
information
Applies talents where
needed
Multiple pers...
Networked life in organizations:
A four-part harmony

1.
2.
3.
4.

Networked individuals
Networked information
Networked w...
Example: Arts organizations
• 1,244 grantees of National Endowment for the
Arts
• Focus: How much, if at all, has technolo...
Generally increasing their online presence
% of arts orgs who say the internet is very or somewhat important for…
Very Imp...
Major functions served by arts orgs’ websites
Multi-Media Content
• 94% post photos on
their website
• 81% post or stream
...
Arts Orgs’ Use of Social Media
The social media platforms arts organizations use…

• 97% of these orgs have a
profile or p...
45% of arts orgs using social media post daily
How often organizations post content on social media…
Other uses of social ...
Do arts orgs see a payoff from social media?
• 56% say it’s had a major impact on
boosting org’s public profile
• 53% see ...
Not everyone is on board the social media train
Major reason

Minor reason

My organization is concerned about the continu...
Be not
afraid
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Networked worlds and networked enterprises

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Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, shows how the large, loosely knit social circles of networked individuals expand opportunities for learning, problem solving, decision making, and personal interaction. The new social operating system of “networked individualism” requires us to develop networking skills and strategies, work on maintaining ties, and balance multiple overlapping networks. The “triple revolution” that has brought on this transformation: the rise of social networking, the capacity of the Internet to empower individuals, and the always-on connectivity of mobile devices. Drawing on extensive evidence, Rainie examines how the move to networked individualism has driven changes in organizational structure, job performance criteria, and the way people interact in workplaces. He presents a glimpse of the new networked enterprise and way of working.

Publicada em: Tecnologia, Negócios
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Networked worlds and networked enterprises

  1. 1. Networked Worlds and Networked Enterprises Lee Rainie - @lrainie Director, Pew Research Center’s Internet Project To: KMWorld Conference 11.7.13
  2. 2. “Tell the truth, and trust the people” -- Joseph N. Pew, Jr. http://bit.ly/dUvWe3 http://bit.ly/100qMub
  3. 3. Networked life in organizations: A four-part harmony 1. 2. 3. 4. Networked individuals Networked information Networked workplaces Networked enterprises
  4. 4. Networked life in organizations: A four-part harmony 1. 2. 3. 4. Networked individuals Networked information Networked workplaces Networked enterprises
  5. 5. Networked Individualism The move to looser, far-flung networks
  6. 6. Personal networks are: More important – trust, influence awareness Differently composed – segmented, layered Perform new functions – sentries, evaluators, audience
  7. 7. But it is not just technological story Other drivers are changes in … Family life Business structures & labor shifts Transportation & living patterns Identity shifts – including in politics, religion … then comes technology
  8. 8. People Function as Networked Individuals and less as group members • Social ties and events organized around the individual rather than a social unit such as a family, neighborhood, school, or organization • Agency: Each person operates own network • Mobile phones and internet allow person-to-person contact to supplant place-to-place communication • The social network revolution has provided the opportunities – and stresses – for people to reach beyond the world of tight groups
  9. 9. Networked life in organizations: A four-part harmony 1. 2. 3. 4. Networked individuals Networked information Networked workplaces Networked enterprises
  10. 10. Digital Revolution 1: Broadband at home - 70% (+10% more have smartphones) - Internet users overall: 85% Dial-up Broadband 100% 70% 80% 60% 40% Broadband at home 3% 20% Dial-up at home 0% June 2000 April 2001 March March 2002 2003 April 2004 March March March 2005 2006 2007 April 2008 April 2009 May 2010 Aug 2011 April 2012 May 2013
  11. 11. Digital Revolution 2 Mobile – 91% … smartphone 56% … tablets 34% 326.4 Total U.S. population: 319 million 2012
  12. 12. Changes in smartphone ownership 80% May 2011 February 2012 May 2013 56% 60% 46% 48% 41% 40% 35% 35% 17% 20% 12% 9% 0% Smartphone Other cell phone No cell phone
  13. 13. Digital Revolution 3 Social networking – 61% of all adults 18-29 100% 30-49 50-64 65+ % of internet users 89% 78% 80% 60% 60% 43% 40% 20% 9% 7% 0% 6% 2005 1% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
  14. 14. The Landscape of Social Media Users (among adults) % of internet users who…. Use Any Social Networking Site Use Facebook Use Google+ LinkedIn The service is especially appealing to 72% Adults ages 18-29, women 71% 31% Women, adults ages 18-29 22% Higher educated Adults ages 30-64, higher income, higher educated Women, adults under 50, whites, those with some college education Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, urban residents Adults ages 18-29, African-Americans, Latinos, women, urban residents Use Pinterest 21% Use Twitter 18% Use Instagram 17% Use Tumblr 6% Adults ages 18-29 reddit 6% Men ages 18-29
  15. 15. The nature of networked information • • • • • Pervasively generated Pervasively consumed Personal via new filters Participatory / social Linked • • • • • Continually edited Multi-platformed Real-time / just-in-time Timeless / searchable Given meaning via networks
  16. 16. Networked life in organizations: A four-part harmony 1. 2. 3. 4. Networked individuals Networked information Networked workplaces Networked enterprises
  17. 17. Networked Work • Not one small bounded group in a hierarchy … simultaneous work in multiple teams • Multidisciplinary • Distributed and heavily reliant on technology for communication and coordination 17
  18. 18. Traditional “fishbowl” vs. Networked “switchboard” • All work in same room • Densely-knit, direct connections • Most interactions within a small group • Frequent contact; recurrent interactions • Long-tie duration • Mentoring by co-located workmates • Repetitive tasks, deskilling • Power: top of the hierarchy • Each works separately • Sparsely-knit, not know each other • Many people contacted in multiple workplaces • Variable, changing frequency of contact • Switching with multiple ties • Less mentoring, harder to learn tacit knowledge • Multiple tasks, added skilling • Power: Betweenness Centrality
  19. 19. Networked work: Balance sheet • • • • • Advantages Surfaces extra information Applies talents where needed Multiple perspectives on solutions More fluid and nimble Potentially more innovative Problems • • • • • • Trust Focus Coordination Loyalty Extra effort Institutional memory lapses
  20. 20. Networked life in organizations: A four-part harmony 1. 2. 3. 4. Networked individuals Networked information Networked workplaces Networked enterprises
  21. 21. Example: Arts organizations • 1,244 grantees of National Endowment for the Arts • Focus: How much, if at all, has technology changed organizational operations and engagement with audiences • Benefits of embracing networked life? Problems?
  22. 22. Generally increasing their online presence % of arts orgs who say the internet is very or somewhat important for… Very Important Somewhat Important Promoting the arts 81% 15% Increasing audience engagement 78% 18% Gathering research and data for grant… 65% 64% Using your organization's resources… 27% 63% Indentifying sources of funding 25% 29% 55% Engaging in arts advocacy 37% 28% Artistic creation and/or collaboration Improving arts cataloging and… 27% 19% Improving arts curation 0% 39% 16% 24% 20% 40% 60% 80% • 86% have increased the number of online events and exhibits they host over the past several years • 97% have a social media presence 29% 33% Providing arts education to the public • 99% host a website 100% Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Arts Organizations Survey. Conducted between May 30-July 20, 2012. N for respondents who answered this question=1,212. • 69% have individual employees with professional social media profiles they use in their capacity as a representative of the organization
  23. 23. Major functions served by arts orgs’ websites Multi-Media Content • 94% post photos on their website • 81% post or stream video • 57% post or stream audio • 50% maintain a blog • 20% present online exhibits Promotion • 86% accept donations online • 74% maintain an online calendar • 72% sell tickets online • 47% sell merchandise online • 34% make info available through RSS feeds • 31% offer discounts through services such as Groupon or LivingSocial Audience Interaction • 90% let patrons share their content via email, SNS and Twitter • 81% let users comment publicly on the site • 28% host online discussion groups • 22% host webinars
  24. 24. Arts Orgs’ Use of Social Media The social media platforms arts organizations use… • 97% of these orgs have a profile or page on a social media site • 69% also have individual employees with professional social media profiles they use as representatives of the organization • 56% of the orgs that use social media have a profile on 4-9 different social media sites Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Arts Organizations Survey. Conducted between May 30-July 20, 2012. N for respondents who answered this question=1,202. • 10% of the orgs that use social media are active on 10+ platforms
  25. 25. 45% of arts orgs using social media post daily How often organizations post content on social media… Other uses of social media… Every few weeks 8% Less often 3% About once a week 16% Several times a week 28% Several times a day 25% About once a day 20% Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Arts Organizations Survey. Conducted between May 30-July 20, 2012. N for respondents who answered this question=1,131. • 82% use social media to engage with audience members prior to, during, or following an event • 77% use social media to monitor what is being said about their organization • 65% use social media to learn more about their audience • 52% use social media to get feedback from the public or “crowdsource” an idea
  26. 26. Do arts orgs see a payoff from social media? • 56% say it’s had a major impact on boosting org’s public profile • 53% see major impact on engagement with public • 48% see major impact on increasing traffic to website • 45% see major impact on event promotion/attendance • 41% see major impact on audience building and stakeholder engagement • 27% see major impact on audience engagement w/content • Just 13% see major impact on professional collaboration, or on fundraising Very true Somewhat true Social media is worth the time our organization spends on it 58% Social media helps my organization reach a broader audience than it would otherwise be able to 33% 52% The younger employees in our organization have a more positive view of social… 41% 38% Social media helps our existing audience members feel more a part of the organization 32% 37% Overall, my organization does not have the personnel or resources it needs to use social media… 48% 30% Social media creates more risks than benefits for our organization 44% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Arts Organizations Survey. Conducted between May 30-July 20, 2012. N for respondents who answered this question=1,117.
  27. 27. Not everyone is on board the social media train Major reason Minor reason My organization is concerned about the continued resources that would be necessary to maintain a successful social media profile or campaign 35% My organization does not have the staff skills or knowledge it needs to begin using social media 30% My organization is able to reach our community/ stakeholders through other means, so we do not need to use social media 25% 18% My organization does not have the financial resources it needs to begin using social media 39% 16% My organization does not use social media because it is too difficult to control what is said in social networking spaces My organization does not have access to the updated hardware or software necessary to use social media effectively 40% 33% 12% 7% 40% 23% My organization tried using social media in the past and found that it was ineffective 5% 5% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Source: Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Arts Orgs Survey. Conducted May 30-July 20, 2012. N for respondents who answered this question=1,117.
  28. 28. Be not afraid

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