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An Introduction to LGBTQ Oppression

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An Introduction to LGBTQ Oppression

  1. 1. By Olivia Domingo, DeShandra Lawrence, Lauren Samuel, Ricki Smith, and Kaitlin Wishmeier
  2. 2. Interview with Dana Butler LMFT, volunteer with OutFront Minnesota • Mission: To create a state where lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people are free to be who they are, love who they love, and live without fear of violence, harassment, or discrimination • Est. 1987 • Programs focus on community organizing, public policy, anti-violence, legal, and education/training Graduate of Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary • Currently employed as private practice counselor in Minnesota • Self-identified LGBTQ Advocate since mid- 1990’s • Focus on progress made in past several decades, such as legalization of same-sex marriage and increased legal protections • Concerns remain for safety of LGBTQ individuals, as well as covert discriminatory practices • Change in current political climate also of great concern for LGBTQ population Please run mouse over speaker and click play button to start audio
  3. 3. Cultural
  4. 4. Political
  5. 5. Legal
  6. 6. Sociodemographic
  7. 7. Economic
  8. 8. Strategies Please run mouse over speaker and click play button to start audio
  9. 9. Lesbian, Gay, Bi- Sexual, & Transgender Community Social Work Profession
  10. 10. National Association of Social Workers (2017) Prior to 1990 Social Workers had no formal training in LGBT work “Structural social work” practices
  11. 11. Thank you!

Notas do Editor

  • Reference: Davis, J. H. & Cooper, H. (2017, July 26). Trump Says Transgender People Will Not Be Allowed in the Military. The New York Times. Retrieved from https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/26/us/politics/trump-transgender-military.html?mcubz=0
  • Image taken from the Human Rights Campaign Preview 2017 Report at http://hrc-assets.s3-website-us-east-1.amazonaws.com//files/assets/resources/2017_Legislative-Document.pdf

    LGBTQ Individuals and their community have long suffered at the hands of the United States legal system. This suffering varies from inclusion to exclusion in laws, which criminalize LGBTQ individuals and the LGBTQ lifestyle or leave room to discriminate against them. In 2017, the LGBTQ community is still in the fight for basic human rights and rights as U.S. citizens. This map is a illustration of Anti-LGBTQ bills introduced into legislative sessions in 2016 that will surface as laws in the years to come if nothing can be done to gain and protect the existing rights of the LGBTQ community.
  • Image taken from article titled Adoption Equality: What The Numbers Are Saying at https://www.alexiamcleod.com/blog/adoption-equality-debate/

    Sociodemographics are social and demographic factors that are combined and used to analyze and describe a individual, group or situation. These factors include but are not limited to sexual orientation, marital status, medical history and family size. Historically, within the U.S., there has always been a attempt to invalidate non-heterosexual and non-cisgender conforming lifestyles. The LGBTQ community has had to face their very existence being considered a mental disorder and their ability to adopt children left in the hands of individual agencies with varying and potentially biased ideologies. Controlling the family structure and hindering the family size of LGBTQ couples not only hurts the couple but impacts the world.
  • Image taken from article titled Employers recognize importance of LGBT benefits to accommodate evolving workforce, new Mercer survey finds at https://www.mercer.com/newsroom/employers-recognize-importance-of-lgbt-benefits.html

    The LGBTQ community has been oppressed in such a way where many aspects of their lives are impacted by decisions made based on homophobic beliefs. When LGBTQ individuals are not acknowledged in certain laws and policies it can leave room for continued and lawful discrimination. The lack of inclusion of LGBTQ in workplace policies has a negative economic impact on the LGBTQ community because it allows individuals to not hire them, fire them or not give them deserved promotions based on their sexual orientation or gender identification.
  • People work very hard to influence and change policies to better the lives of oppressed groups. For the LGBTQ community, it is no secret that foundations of policies often involve anti-LGBTQ characteristics. This ultimately denies LGBTQ individuals basic freedoms and rights that most Americans experience. However, according to the American Civil Liberties Union (2017), by the end of 2016, 20 states made it illegal to discriminate individuals based on sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression in employment, housing, and other public resource accommodations. The LGBTQ community continues to make significant strides to influence and change public policies to meet their needs.

    Some strategies that are discussed more thoroughly in our wiki are: open communication, the portrayal of the population as “victims,” involving supporters, making it easy for protectors to support the LGBTQ community (shown in this slide on the bottom right is a pride parade for anyone in the city to attend), emphasizing the success of LGBTQ individuals, and utilizing social media and mainstream outlets as resources for all of the above.



    Photos retrieved from:
    http://www.woodlandsonline.com/evps/evitem.cfm?evid=109964
    http://www.playbuzz.com/theblaze10/facebook-gay-marriage-logo
    http://mashable.com/2014/06/10/pride-parade-evolution/#zWFoRe7hhZqY

  • There have been great social changes for the LGBTQ community, especially in recent years.

    This a current map of the US, showing presence or lack of presence of employment non-discrimination laws protecting LGBT individuals from unfair employment practices. The dark green represents the active presence of an employment non-discrimination law covering sexual orientation and gender identity , light green represents a non-discrimination law covering only sexual orientation, yellow represents states with no employment non-discrimination law, and the caution sign means state has law preventing passage or enforcement of local nondiscrimination laws.

    Please explore the highlighted link provided in the strategies section of our wiki. This website also provides similar representations of the US as the map I provided above involving housing, public accommodations, credit, and state employees. You are able to click on any state to view its specific LGBTQ population statistics, policies, and laws.


    Photo retrieved from:
    http://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/non_discrimination_laws
  • This photo is also retrieved from the same website as the map in the previous slide. LGBTQ rights in the US vary by state and jurisdiction. THERE IS NO FEDERAL LAW OUTLAWING DISCRIMINATION OF LGBTQ INDIVIDUALS NATIONWIDE. It is evident that there is more work that needs to be done to end the oppressionof the LGBTQ community.

    Photo retrieved from:
    http://www.lgbtmap.org/equality-maps/non_discrimination_laws
    http://www.gvsu.edu/lgbtq/
  • References

    Bowen, E. (n.d.). Addressing the Inequality Epidemic: Applying a Structural Approach to Social Work Practice with People Affected by HIV/AIDS in the United States [Abstract]. Critical Social Work, 13(1). Retrieved October 16, 2017.​

    Morrow, D. F., & Messinger, L. (Eds.). (2006). Sexual orientation and gender expression in social work practice: Working with gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people. Columbia University Press.​

    National Association of Social Workers. (2017). Retrieved October 09, 2017, from http://www.naswdc.org/​


    By Ricki Smith - Kent School of Social Work SW601

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