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OECD Roundtable on Smart Cities and Inclusive Growth

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OECD Roundtable on Smart Cities and Inclusive Growth

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Cities around the world are still battling COVID-19 and shaping their way out of the crisis.

As the world learns to live with the virus, never have digital technologies and innovation been so valuable to help cities navigate the crisis and accelerate the transition towards a more sustainable and resilient future. Both before and during the pandemic, smart city initiatives have flourished around the globe, together with various attempts to develop smart city indices and indicators.

With substantial public funding channelled into smart recovery efforts, it is more critical than ever to assess whether investment in smart cities improves people’s lives. To what extent do smart cities deliver concrete well-being outcomes for all? How can such outcomes be effectively measured, monitored and maximised?

Learn more from our Roundtable: oe.cd/sc-rt

Cities around the world are still battling COVID-19 and shaping their way out of the crisis.

As the world learns to live with the virus, never have digital technologies and innovation been so valuable to help cities navigate the crisis and accelerate the transition towards a more sustainable and resilient future. Both before and during the pandemic, smart city initiatives have flourished around the globe, together with various attempts to develop smart city indices and indicators.

With substantial public funding channelled into smart recovery efforts, it is more critical than ever to assess whether investment in smart cities improves people’s lives. To what extent do smart cities deliver concrete well-being outcomes for all? How can such outcomes be effectively measured, monitored and maximised?

Learn more from our Roundtable: oe.cd/sc-rt

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OECD Roundtable on Smart Cities and Inclusive Growth

  1. 1. 2nd Roundtable on Smart Cities & Inclusive Growth OECD Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities Measuring smart cities’ performance: Do smart cities benefit everyone? With the support of
  2. 2. Dec 2020 1stRoundtableon SmartCities& InclusiveGrowth July 2019 July 2020 Contribution toG20Saudi Presidency OECDMinisterial CouncilMeeting May 2019 2ndRoundtableon SmartCities& InclusiveGrowth Link Link Link Link
  3. 3. COVID-19 and Cities : Impact, Lessons and Recovery Strategies in 100+ cities Access our report in 4 languages: English – http://oe.cd/covid-cities-en French – http://oe.cd/covid-cities-fr Spanish – http://oe.cd/covid-cities-es Portuguese – http://oe.cd/covid-cities-pt
  4. 4. Soo-Jin Kim Deputy Head Cities, Urban Policies and Sustainable Development Division OECD Moderation
  5. 5. Lamia Kamal-Chaoui Director Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities OECD Opening Remarks (I)
  6. 6. Opening Remarks (II) Im-Rak Choi Director General for Urban Policy, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport Korea (MOLIT)
  7. 7. Session I. How can smart city measurement help drive COVID-19 recovery and resilience?
  8. 8. 06 INSERT YOUR TEXT 01 INSERT YOUR TEXT 03 INSERT YOUR TEXT 05 INSERT YOUR TEXT Panel Discussion Chaesub Lee Director of the Telecommunication Standardisation Bureau International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Vincent Ducrey CEO and Co-founder of HUB Institute Dae-Yeon Cho Chief Director of National Strategic Smart Program Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Jennifer Cowley Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of North Texas Nikolaus Summer Senior Expert, Urban Innovation Vienna Smart City Agency Sebastiano Toffaletti Secretary General of the European Digital SME Alliance How can smart city measurement help drive COVID-19 recovery and resilience?
  9. 9. Chaesub Lee Director of the Telecommunication Standardisation Bureau International Telecommunication Union (ITU) Session I - Panel discussion
  10. 10. ITU (International Telecommunication Union), ITU-T SG20 Green recoveryAir quality index (AQI) [PM2.5; PM10; NO2; SO2; O3] Percentage of renewable energy consumed in the city Electricity consumption per capita Residential thermal energy consumption per capita Energy consumption of public buildings Length of public transport network per 100 000 inhabitants Percentage of city population with convenient access to public transport Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions per capita Transportation mode share (for travel to work) Percentage of major streets monitored by ICT Number of shared bicycles per 100 000 inhabitants Percentage of low-carbon emission passenger vehicles Percentage of the city designated as a pedestrian/car free zone Percentage of public transport stops with dynamic information available Number of shared vehicles per 100 000 inhabitants Percentage of road intersections using adaptive traffic control measures Ratio of travel time during peak periods to free flow periods U4SSC KPIs to measure post COVID-19
  11. 11. Dae-Yeon Cho Chief Director of National Strategic Smart Program Korea Agency for Infrastructure Technology Advancement (KAIA) Session I - Panel discussion
  12. 12. Nikolaus Summer Senior Expert, Urban Innovation Vienna Smart City Agency Session I - Panel discussion
  13. 13. SMART CITY VIENNA OECD 2ND SMART CITY ROUNDTABLE 03.12.2020  © Wiener Linien / bildstrecke / Johannes Zinner
  14. 14. RESOURCE CONSERVATION QUALITY OF LIFE INNOVATION • Vienna is the city with the highest quality of life and life satisfaction in the world. • Vienna focuses on social inclusion in its policy design and administrative activities. • Vienna reduces its local per capita greenhouse gas emissions by 50% by 2030, and by 85% by 2050. • Vienna reduces its local per capita final energy consumption by 30% by 2030, and by 50% by 2050. • Vienna reduces its material footprint of consumption per capita by 30% by 2030, and by 50% by 2050. • By 2030 Vienna is a social innovation leader. • Vienna is among Europe‘s digital leaders. Smart City Vienna Framework Strategy
  15. 15. Monitoring  Management requires measurement!
  16. 16. Complexity  Interrelations, Target-Conflicts & Rebounds HOME OFFICE?
  17. 17. THANK YOU! SUMMER@URBANINNOVATION.AT  © City of Vienna / Gerd W. Götzenbrucker / frischesgras
  18. 18. Sebastiano Toffaletti Secretary General of the European Digital SME Alliance Session I - Panel discussion
  19. 19. Jennifer Cowley Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, University of North Texas Session I - Panel discussion
  20. 20. Vincent Ducrey CEO and Co-founder of HUB Institute Session I - Panel discussion
  21. 21. FOCUSCITOYENS FOCUSGOVT Micro-mobility Smart Parking MAAS Shared Mobility Public transportation Connected Vehicles PersonalVehicle Accessibility Network Construction Long-distance Intermodality Housing Social Responsibility Connected House Energy-efficiency & sustainable housing Shared housing Local & social proximity Neighborhood associations Housing offer evolution Citizen co-construction Demographic evolution impact New local area services Connected building BIM Co-working & New models Smart Maintenance Building as a service (R2S) Accessibility & activities Building Automation Systems Company network & security Industrial buildings & Circular economy Digital building twins Risk Mgmt of industrial buildings Connected School & campus Family facilities Sport facilities Health & hospital services Seniors’ services PRM policy Inclusion & diversity policy Homeless, migrants, paperless Animals in the city City centre activity Integrated commercial area AR & Geo-tracking Impact of local stores Autonomous shops Sustainable commerce & Local produce Brand-city collaborations Urban logistics Last mile delivery City billboard network City Information Management (CIM) Public connected equipment IT infrastructure Electricity infrastructure Smart Grid Road infrastructure Intelligente traffic signs Transports (rail, harbours, airports, road) Urban property Street lights Sustainable & connected building sites Energy efficiency Renewable energies Pollution (air, noise, soil, visual) Industrial & housing waste recycling Water distribution & quality Climatisation et urban heating Circular economy Urban farming Bio-diversity & vegetalization Urban density optimization Housing offer optimization Tourism flow management Eco-tourism Protection of cultural heritage Business tourism, trade fairs (MICE) Tourist information New cultural activities Major public & sports events Tourism marketplace Tourist attraction e-Gouvernance e-Administration Participative platforms Open Data & Govt Data Innovative third locations Civil servant training CivicTech Inter-territorial coopération New financing methods Legislation evolution Risk management (climate, health, industry, public disorder) Sensor & camera network Anticipation/détection de situation à risque Analysis/Decision making Control center - Hypervisor Action management Information distribution / public alerts Infrastructure & Cyber security Event security Urban resilience policy FOCUSINFRASTRUCTURE 01 02 03 04 MOBILITY & TRANSPORT LOCAL BUSINESSES & SUBURBS BUSINESS DISTRICT & INDUSTRIAL ZONES HOUSING & NEIGHBORHOOD LIFE 06 07 08 09 10 ENERGY & ENVIRONNEMENT LOCAL GOVERNANCE AND METROPOLIS SAFE CITY & RESILIENCE INFRASTRUCTURE & MAINTENANCE EDUCATION, SPORT, HEALTH & INCLUSION05 100KEYPROJECTS TOURISM, LEISURE, CULTURE & HERITAGE
  22. 22. SMART CITY SCORE CARD QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS 21 Short Term Solutions Mid Term Solutions Long Term Solutions
  23. 23. FILL UP YOUR HEAT MAP QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS Project 1 Project 2 Project 3 Project 4 Project 5 Project 6 Project 7 Project 8 Project 9 Project 10 Mobility Housing Business & Industry Commerce Inclusion Infrastructure Environnement Leisure Safe City Local Govt On track Hurdles Blocked
  24. 24. Do your members already use existing smart city indicators, and if so, have you already observed cases where smart city indicators have inspired policy change ?
  25. 25. CONNECT YOUR PEERS METROPOLIS OR INNOVATIVE CITIES Paris Bordeaux Toulouse Perpignan Montpellier Strasbourg Lille Caen Brest Rouen Lyon Dijon Marseille Nice Grenoble Nancy Metz Le Havre Le Mans Nantes Angers Rennes Reims Limoges Poitiers Cl-Ferrand Toulon St-Etienne Tours Orléans Amiens Arras Cannes Monaco Nimes METROPOLIS INNOVATIVE CITIES HUB SUSTAIN CITIES
  26. 26. Let’s work together on the perfect transformation roadmap for smarter, greener and more inclusive cities
  27. 27. Discussant Caroline Paunov Senior Economist Directorate for Science, Technology and Innovation (STI) OECD
  28. 28. Session II. What should the OECD framework on smart cities assess?
  29. 29. Camille Viros Economist/Policy Analyst Setting the scene Marcos Diaz Ramirez Junior Economist Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities (CFE), OECD
  30. 30. The OECD Smart City Measurement Framework
  31. 31. From definition …to measurement “Smart cities” are cities that… … leverage digitalisation … engage stakeholders … to improve people’s well- being & to build more inclusive, sustainable & resilient societies Smart city tools Stakeholder engagement Smart city performance
  32. 32. Pillar 1: Smart city tools What it measures: the degree of digitalisation and digital innovation implemented at the city level 8 proposed dimensions reflecting the main areas of urban life transformed by digital technologies Suggested indicators: input and output indicators for each of these dimensions
  33. 33. Pillar 2: Stakeholder engagement What it measures: the level of stakeholder engagement as an input to the process of shaping the smart city Key stakeholders of a smart city are: • The city/local and national government • The city’s residents (including NGOs and knowledge institutions) • The private sector Suggested indicators measure several aspects of engagement such as inclusiveness and equity, accountability, capacity, effectiveness and adaptiveness
  34. 34. Pillar 3: Smart city performance What it measures: the performance of smart cities … … in fostering four key objectives • well-being • inclusion • sustainability • Resilience Suggested indicators: outcome indicators of the effects of smart city initiatives on these four objectives
  35. 35. Next steps • Identify the right scale of analysis • Select the specific indicators for each pillar • Define the sources of data • Collect the data and explore ways to fill the gaps
  36. 36. Panel Discussion Jonathan Woetzel Director and Senior Partner McKinsey Global Institute Olga Kordas Director of Viable Cities (Swedish National Strategic Innovation Program for Smart and Sustainable Cities) & Associate Professor of KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden Jae-Yong Lee Director of Smart Green City Research Center Korean Research Institute for Human Settlements (KRIHS) Ane Miren Ibañez Zugazaga Managing Director Bilbao TIK, Spain Masahiro Ito Director of International Affairs Office, City Bureau Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Japan Yuria Nakamura Director of Research and Planning Department, Organisation for Promoting Urban Development (MINTO), Japan What should the OECD framework on smart cities assess?
  37. 37. Jonathan Woetzel Director and Senior Partner McKinsey Global Institute Session II - Panel discussion
  38. 38. Jae-Yong Lee Director of Smart Green City Research Center Korean Research Institute for Human Settlements (KRIHS) Session II - Panel discussion
  39. 39. Source: Lee et al.(2016)
  40. 40. Quantitative Index Monitoring Current Status of Smart Cities in Korea Apply to Korean Local Governments from 2021 Qualitative Index Monitoring Current Status & Potential Power of Smart Cities in Korea
  41. 41. Technology & Infra.GovernanceInnovation Public Ability Private & Citizen Ability Data Sharing & Use Ability ㅎOrganization Participation Network Fund ㅎRegulatory System Intelligent Facility & Service Network Urban Intelligent Center Quantitative Index Smart City Officer Ability Smart City KPI Employment & Start-Up Living Lab & Fab Lab Data Sharing System Integration Data Integration Consultative Body Ordinance Political Network Social Network Short term & Longterm Budget Private Sector Operation Center 9&more Service facility Wired & Wireless Network Qualitative Index Technology & Infra.GovernanceInnovation 1.Initial 2. Partially fulfilled 3. Fulfilled 4. Improving 5. Sustainably Optimising
  42. 42. Masahiro Ito Director of International Affairs Office, City Bureau Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Japan Session II - Panel discussion
  43. 43. PROMOTION OF SMART CITIES IN JAPAN 2ND OECD Roundtable on Smart Cities and Inclusive Growth ITO Masahiro Director of International Affairs Office, City Bureau Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT), Japan NAKAMURA Yuria Director of Research and Planning Department, Senior Staff Researcher Organization for Promoting Urban Development (MINTO), Japan 1
  44. 44. MLIT Official Report “A Way Forward to Smart City ~Interim Version~ ” ・・・ ・ ・ ・ ・ ・ ・ Mobility Urban Environment Energy & Resource Safety & Security Inclusive Community Annual number of public transport trips per capita Green Area per 100,000 Population Percentage of Employees using remote working Share of Renewable Energy Percentage of smart building with building management system Percentage of building adopting contactless technology Percentage of city area covered by hazard warning system ・・・ ・・・ Women’s labor force participation rate Citizen’s participation rate for local activities Theme Indicator International / Japanese Standards ISO37120/37153, SDGs Indicators, IEC 63152 etc. Urban Challenge Response to COVID-19 Car-dependent society Regional Economy Response to COVID-19 Limited green space in urban area Optimizing energy consumption Reduction of CO2 emissions Disaster management Response to COVID-19 ・ ・ ・ ・・・ ・・・ ・ ・ ・ Approach for Establishing Smart City Indicator Develop Smart City Indicator based on the goal of each theme and urban challenge. Respective indicator refers to International and Japanese standards. Weak-ties in local community Gender gap in employment ・・・ ・・ ・ Annual growth rate of employment Percentage of building utilizing advanced network infrastructure Big data utilization for biz activity Shrinking local economy ・・ ・ Number of people using alternative mobility service (e.g. mobility on demand) 2
  45. 45. Overview • Approx. 28ha area re-development with concept of new mobility, congestion mitigation, and disaster prevention capabilities • Install City OS to offer multi-sectoral services by utilizing advanced IoT technologies and real time data. • A land mark smart building “Tokyo Port City Takeshiba” developed by Tokyu Land Corporation. 【Transportation】 【Commercial】 【Area Management】 3D data 【Disaster prevention】 Digital signage Congestion info., personalized marketing Target Area (Approx.28ha) Apply to other sectors Ship MaaS, Autonomous Tokyo Bay Service City OS Device, Data City OS (Smart City Platform) ParkingWeather DisasterCongestion Energy Trans- portation Disaster prevention Area management Commerce ・・・ ・・・ Case Study - Smart City Takeshiba Overview of City OSOverview of Area Services Tokyo Port City Takeshiba 3
  46. 46. Case Study - Smart City Takeshiba Smart Solutions in Tokyo Port City Takeshiba Mobility Urban Environment Open working space with open Wi-Fi and green infrastructure for comfortable working environment. Safety & Security Face recognition system with thermography guides users to uncrowded elevators by digital signage in the building. Energy & Resources Building management application that collects data by 1,300 sensors and keeps the entire building comfortable. e.g. Elevator Congestion Signage Indicator: Number of people using alternative mobility service 500 m long pedestrian deck connecting the station and the sea port for safe mobility. Indicator: Percentage of building adopting contactless technology Indicator: Percentage of smart building with building management system Indicator: Green Area per 100,000 Population e.g. Laser Sensor On The Ceiling
  47. 47. Yuria Nakamura Director of Research and Planning Department, Organization for Promoting Urban Development (MINTO), Japan Session II - Panel discussion
  48. 48. Organization for Promoting Urban Development (abbrev. “MINTO”) - Established in 1987 - A general incorporated foundation designated by the Minister of of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) - Offers financial support including investment and loans to private urban development projects by utilizing governmental funds, government guaranteed bonds, etc. - Provides expertise on finance and urban development while collaborating with relevant industries - Supported more than 1,400 projects /1.8 trillion yen in total 1. Investment 2. Support for solving local issues 3. Long-term/stable loan type support (1) Town Renewal Investment (2) Management-type town development fund (3) Crowdfunding-type town development fund etc. (4) Mezzanine support (5) Communal Urban Redevelopment 5
  49. 49. MINTO’s mission One of the key points for promoting Smart City: public-private collaborations MINTO’s mission, as a partner for urban development projects, is to contribute for creating attractive cities by providing stable financial support. Banks Developers General contractors Governments 6
  50. 50. Promotion of Smart Cities by MINTO Mezzanine support - A financial support applicable for urban development projects approved by MLIT, providing subordinated loans to supplement bank senior loans. - Contributes to stabilize long-term projects that usually require large sum of funds. ・Government guaranteed borrowing ・Government guaranteed bonds *image Smart Building control device camera, sensor local government etc. data provision data acquisition From this year, we started new support for “smart buildings” utilizing AI, IoT, etc. (ex. camera, sensor, beacon, control device)  productivity improvement  energy conservation  area value improvement etc. MINTO Private financial institutions, etc. ・Loan ・Acquisition of bonds Land, building Senior Mezzanine SPC, etc. Equity urban development project (approved by MLIT) Private financial institutions Loans, etc. National government 7
  51. 51. Thank you for your attention! ■ MLIT Contact: 2-1-3 Kasumigaseki, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100-8918 Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism International Affairs Office, City Bureau +81-3-5253-8955 hqt-iao_cb_kokusai6@mlit.go.jp ■ MINTO Contact: Toyosu Center Building 8F, 3-3-3 Toyosu, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-6008 Organization for Promoting Urban Development +81-3-5546-0791 info@minto.or.jp 8
  52. 52. Ane Miren Ibañez Zugazaga Managing Director Bilbao TIK, Spain Session II - Panel discussion
  53. 53. Olga Kordas Director of Viable Cities (Swedish National Strategic Innovation Program for Smart and Sustainable Cities) & Associate Professor of KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden Session II - Panel discussion
  54. 54. Viable Cities – a Swedish Strategic Innovation Programme for Smart and Sustainable Cities Assos. Professor Olga Kordas, Programme Director
  55. 55. Nine Swedish cities and their partners are pioneering efforts to accelerate climate transition Mission: Climate neutral cities 2030 with a good life for all within planetary boundaries Digitalisation and citizen engagement important enablers
  56. 56.  Outputs (short term) i.e CO2, Community Wealth  Outcomes (medium terms) i.e economic justice, bridging social capital, imagination, health, human development  Capabilities transition (societal) i.e sense-making, experimentation, learning and development, societal decision making  Key goal to improve learning and adaptability at different levels  Within innovation projects, between projects, on city level, between cities  Reflexivity, higher order learning (shifting norms, discourses)  Evaluation as strategic part of policy design and implementation Evaluation/measurement: systems transformation towards climate neutral and sustainable cities
  57. 57.  ‘Formative evaluation’ as opportunity for reflection, help to change direction or adjust ongoing developments, projects and processes Upcoming publication by Harald Rohracher, Lars Coenen, Olga Kordas  Limitations of “rationalistic tradition”  value neutrality, objective assessment, measurable outcomes  Shift towards argumentative/ constructivist evaluation  Focus on processes instead of outcomes  Dialogue and participation as starting point  Indicators as ‘sites of collective imagination’, i.e. engagement with indicators as part of the transition process; making visible what counts Formative evaluation
  58. 58. Conclusion & charting the way forward
  59. 59. Nadim Ahmad Deputy Director, Centre for Entrepreneurship, SMEs, Regions and Cities (CFE), OECD Conclusion
  60. 60. Thank you for participating! @OECD_local Follow us on Twitter and LinkedIn | Subscribe to our Newsletter|Check out our Website smart.cities@oecd.org |

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