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Role of team leader, Qualities of Effective Team Leader, Belbin Team Roles

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Role of team leader, Qualities of Effective Team Leader, Belbin Team Roles

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Role of team leader, Qualities of Effective Team Leader, Belbin Team Roles, Creating and maintaining a team, Twelve characteristics that all leaders need, seven qualities, effective team leadership, BELBIN'S TEAM ROLES,

Role of team leader, Qualities of Effective Team Leader, Belbin Team Roles, Creating and maintaining a team, Twelve characteristics that all leaders need, seven qualities, effective team leadership, BELBIN'S TEAM ROLES,

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Role of team leader, Qualities of Effective Team Leader, Belbin Team Roles

  1. 1. ROLES OF TEAM LEADER QUALITIES OF EFFECTIVE TEAM LEADER BELBIN TEAM ROLES NIDHIN CHANDRASEKHARAN TEAM BUILDING DEPARTMENT OF IMK KERALA UNIVERSITY
  2. 2. Roles of Team Leader ◦ Team leaders are those who leads the team
  3. 3. Characteristics common across different team leader roles. These are:  Control: Team leaders are only responsible for the work of the one team. Managers may be responsible for several teams or for one large team that is divided into ‘sub-teams’ or groups.  Responsibility: Team Leaders play extremely important role in motivating company's teams and ensuring their success. Some of their duties include communicating company goals, safety practices, and deadlines with designated teams. They are responsible for motivating team members and assessing their performance and evaluation.  Communication: Team leaders are the main channel of communication between the team and the organization. They pass on information and provide feedback.
  4. 4. Creating and maintaining a team ™ Share common goals ™ work co-operatively (they help and support each other) ™ show respect for each other ™ have the knowledge and skills to do their tasks well ™ see themselves as being a team.
  5. 5. Twelve characteristics that all leaders need. 1. Communication and social skills 2. Personal drive, sense of purpose and motivation 3. Dependability, conscientiousness and persistence 4. Ability to motivate others 5. Innovation and vision 6. Honesty and integrity 7. Self-confidence, willingness to accept challenges and take risks, emotional maturity 8. Ability to inspire trust 9. Intelligence 10. Knowledge about the organization you work for 11. Genuine interest in others and valuing them 12. A team orientation (you like working with a team of people) 12
  6. 6. You need all these characteristics to create trust and respect.  Trust comes from people knowing that you do what you say you will do, and that if you say you can do something you can do it.  Respect comes from people observing your behavior and seeing that you don’t compromise on your personal values, the things that you believe in. If you believe in something, you are not afraid to say what you believe in, and you act in ways that show what you believe in.
  7. 7. There are seven qualities to develop as a team leader. These will help you to motivate your team members and to adopt an effective leadership style. ◦ They are: 1. Be positive – focus on solving problems not blaming other people for them and involve the team in developing a plan of action. 2. Be consistent – enable people to predict their team leader’s behavior and help them to respond in a positive way. 3. Be responsive – make accurate assessments of the needs and expectations of the team. 4. Be self-aware – recognize your strengths and weaknesses and those of the team and ‘play to their strengths’ and develop their weaknesses. 5. Be developmental – identify your own and others training needs and support the team in meeting these. 6. Be persuasive – make an effective case to support the work of the team. 7. Be innovative – be clear about future needs and able to encourage team members to meet these needs.
  8. 8. Are you a effective team leader?
  9. 9. EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP  set high, but realistic, performance objectives, not only for themselves, but also for team colleagues;  find ways to improve existing practices and policies; and meet and, better still, exceed current standards of learning, teaching, and pupil achievement.
  10. 10. Performing a role as important as team leader is dependent on a set of separate, but interacting, influences:  Personal characteristics, e.g. personality, skills, motivation;  Self-presentation, e.g. visibility, profile, role modelling;  Self-organization, e.g. time management, stress management, selecting priorities.  Self-development, e.g. reflection, career aspirations, development opportunities; and  Situational characteristics, e.g. school context, team maturity, length of Experience.
  11. 11. CHARACTERISTICS OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE TEAM LEADERS  Strategic leaders are able to picture a range of possibilities several stages ahead of the current phase of organizational development. It was said of Napoleon that like a good chess player he could envisage several steps ahead and consider various permutations.  Strategic leadership is pragmatic rather than ‘head in the clouds’. The strategies developed will lead to tactics, which will need to engage with and succeed in the real school world. These strategies must therefore be based on a realistic appraisal of the environment in which the school finds itself, the resources at its disposal and the opportunities that exist.  Strategic leaders have a great sense of timing – they have the patience to wait until the time is right to make a major intervention, yet have the boldness to strike decisively when the moment is right. They and their schools are alert and ready to seize an opportunity.
  12. 12. ◦ Leaders whose current work is future-focused are more likely to be working strategically. They invest their time in developing people and their capability for the future of the school, as well as managing the current needs of the school. ◦ A strategic leader is willing to work with others in alliances and agreements to make a more significant intervention than either party would be able to make alone. If necessary, the strategic leader is willing to subordinate the school’s need for recognition to making progress against a broader agenda for change. ◦ To be effective, your team leadership behavior needs to be consciously directed and controlled. This implies a need to understand yourself and your actions. In book, The Successful Self (1989), the psychotherapist, Dorothy Rowe describes the successful or effective person as having: ◦ Awareness – not only an insight into themselves but also into others ◦ Understanding – holding theories about the causes of events and people’s behavior, but being aware of how these theories are formed.
  13. 13. Six characteristics of a successful self  feeling valuable, self-accepting and self-confident;  not engaged in a constant battle to preserve their personal reputation;  flexible and creative in developing themselves in ways that are congruent with their sense of who they are and their purpose in life;  using their view of the world as a basis for making their own decisions and being creative;  having developed the skills to understand and work with other views of the world; and  having created a life story for themselves that gives a sense of progress – past events are interpreted in a positive light and are seen as leading to a positive future.
  14. 14. BELBIN'S TEAM ROLES ◦ Belbin identified nine team roles and he categorized those roles into three groups: Action Oriented, People Oriented, and Thought Oriented. Each team role is associated with typical behavioral and interpersonal strengths. ◦ Belbin also defined characteristic weaknesses that tend to accompany each team role. He called the characteristic weaknesses of team roles the "allowable" weaknesses; as for any behavioral weakness, these are areas to be aware of and potentially improve. ◦ The nine team roles are:
  15. 15. 1. Action Oriented Roles Shaper (SH) ◦ Shapers are people who challenge the team to improve. They are dynamic and usually extroverted people who enjoy stimulating others, questioning norms, and finding the best approaches for solving problems. The Shaper is the one who shakes things up to make sure that all possibilities are considered and that the team does not become complacent. ◦ Shapers often see obstacles as exciting challenges and they tend to have the courage to push on when others feel like quitting. ◦ Their potential weaknesses may be that they're argumentative, and that they may offend people's feelings.
  16. 16. Implementer (IMP) ◦ Implementers are the people who get things done. They turn the team's ideas and concepts into practical actions and plans. They are typically conservative, disciplined people who work systematically and efficiently and are very well organized. These are the people who you can count on to get the job done. ◦ On the downside, Implementers may be inflexible and can be somewhat resistant to change.
  17. 17. Completer-Finisher (CF) ◦ Completer-Finishers are the people who see that projects are completed thoroughly. They ensure that there have been no errors or omissions and they pay attention to the smallest of details. They are very concerned with deadlines and will push the team to make sure the job is completed on time. They are described as perfectionists who are orderly, conscientious and anxious. ◦ However, a Completer-Finisher may worry unnecessarily, and may find it hard to delegate.
  18. 18. 2. People Oriented Roles Coordinator (CO) ◦ Coordinators are the ones who take on the traditional team-leader role and have also been referred to as the chairmen. They guide the team to what they perceive are the objectives. They are often excellent listeners and they are naturally able to recognize the value that each team member brings to the table. They are calm and good-natured, and delegate tasks very effectively. ◦ Their potential weaknesses are that they may delegate away too much personal responsibility, and may tend to be manipulative.
  19. 19. Team Worker (TW) ◦ Team Workers are the people who provide support and make sure that people within the team are working together effectively. These people fill the role of negotiators within the team and they are flexible, diplomatic and perceptive. These tend to be popular people who are very capable in their own right, but who prioritize team cohesion and helping people get along. ◦ Their weaknesses may be a tendency to be indecisive, and to maintain uncommitted positions during discussions and decision-making.
  20. 20. Resource Investigator (RI) ◦ Resource Investigators are innovative and curious. They explore available options, develop contacts, and negotiate for resources on behalf of the team. They are enthusiastic team members, who identify and work with external stakeholders to help the team accomplish its objective. They are outgoing and are often extroverted, meaning that others are often receptive to them and their ideas. ◦ On the downside, they may lose enthusiasm quickly, and are often overly optimistic.
  21. 21. 3. Thought Oriented Roles Plant (PL) ◦ The Plant is the creative innovator who comes up with new ideas and approaches. They thrive on praise but criticism is especially hard for them to deal with. Plants are often introverted and prefer to work apart from the team. Because their ideas are so novel, they can be impractical at times. ◦ They may also be poor communicators and can tend to ignore given parameters and constraints.
  22. 22. Monitor-Evaluator (ME) ◦ Monitor-Evaluators are best at analyzing and evaluating ideas that other people (often Plants) come up with. These people are shrewd and objective, and they carefully weigh the pros and cons of all the options before coming to a decision. ◦ Monitor-Evaluators are critical thinkers and very strategic in their approach. They are often perceived as detached or unemotional. Sometimes they are poor motivators who react to events rather than instigating them
  23. 23. Specialist (SP) ◦ Specialists are people who have specialized knowledge that is needed to get the job done. They pride themselves on their skills and abilities, and they work to maintain their professional status. Their job within the team is to be an expert in the area, and they commit themselves fully to their field of expertise. ◦ This may limit their contribution, and lead to a preoccupation with technicalities at the expense of the bigger picture.
  24. 24. References ◦ The Nine Belbin Team Roles. (n.d.). Https://Www.Belbin.Com/about/Belbin-Team-Roles/. https://www.belbin.com/about/belbin-team-roles/ ◦ http://www.innspub.net/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/IJB-V4No1-p158-166.pdf. (2014). International Journal of Biosciences (IJB), 4(1), 158–166. https://doi.org/10.12692/ijb/4.1.158-166 ◦ Silviana, B. G. (2019). Intellectual Assets Management Model. Procedia Manufacturing, 32, 1064– 1068. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.promfg.2019.02.322

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