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Essay writing at level 2

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Essay writing at level 2

  1. 1. Essay Writing at Level 2<br />Preparation for External Standards<br />
  2. 2. Analyse the question<br />At Level 2, the questions are more complex than Level 1.<br />The question will require careful reading for understanding before you begin.<br />Examples:a) Poetry and / or song lyrics often capture brief moments in which there is a search for meaning in human lives.<br /> Analyse how the writer has explored aspects of human experience, such as love, regret, joy, or racism, in at least TWO poems and / or song lyrics you have studied.<br />b) In short written texts, writers often use symbols to represent complex or significant ideas.<br /> Analyse how symbols have been used to develop your understanding of people OR ideas in at least TWO short written texts you have studied.<br />
  3. 3. Analyse the Question 2<br />Underline KEY WORDS<br />Identify what is being asked, which ASPECTS of the text you are expected to cover and what CONTENT you are expected to know and use.<br />Identify what you have to offer an OPINION on.<br />
  4. 4. Zero Draft<br />Clear your head by zero drafting – an extremely loose brainstorm. <br />Write down any thoughts you have, no matter how random. Don’t censor yourself at this stage (“that’s stupid/irrelevant/not what they want”).<br />Draw lines or in your own way start making connections between your thoughts and the question.<br />Go back to the question and think – what opinion have I formed?<br />
  5. 5. Thesis Statement<br />In a Level 2 essay, aim to offer a thesis statement: your main point, summed up in a concise sentence that lets the reader know where you're going, and why.<br />This summarises your opinion on the debate that is implied in the question.<br />The idea is to look like you are offering an informed point of view on the topic: a clear assertion that you can write your entire essay around. <br />
  6. 6. Outline<br />The rest of the introduction outlines how you’re going to prove your case. <br />Your second sentence should mention the author, and how his/her work supports the case you stated in the first sentence.<br />Your next sentence should state which texts you will be discussing and (briefly) the topics you will conver in each paragraph.<br />Your introduction should start ‘globally’ with your thesis statement, then move ‘locally’ to mention your texts and arguments.<br />
  7. 7. Body Paragraphs<br />Each body paragraph should, as you know, develop one of the main ideas mentioned in your introduction.<br />The key difference is that you are arguing a case. The tone should be formal, but persuasive. <br />You should offer a variety of quotations and explanations to support your points.<br />At the end of each paragraph, you should re-visit your thesis, linking back to the introduction and on to your next paragraph.<br />
  8. 8. Conclusion<br />The introduction moved from local to global. A good conclusion will do the reverse: move from the texts back out to the thesis statement. <br />Try to gracefully exit your essay by making a quick wrap-up sentence, and then end on some memorable thought, perhaps a quotation, or an interesting twist of logic.<br />
  9. 9. Language<br />You haven’t finished writing your essay until you've polished your language by:correcting the grammar,making sentences flow,incoporating rhythm, emphasis, adjusting the formality, giving it a level-headed tone, and making other intuitive edits. <br />Proofread until it reads just how you want it to sound. Writing an essay can be tedious, but you don't want to bungle the hours of conceptual work you've put into writing your essay by leaving a few slippymisppallings and pourlywordeddphrazies..<br />

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