O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.
{ AN INSIDE LOOK AT NEIU’S
FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE }
IN CHICAGO CLOSETS!
Chuck Kane
MEMORIAL GOLF OUTING The MUSIC & LITERAC...
15 17
D E P A R T M E N T S
3 	 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR
4 	 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE
6 	 AROUND THE COMMONS I news & notes about...
INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 	 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine	 4	
PRESIDENT’SImessage
“Much like this
magazine, new a...
PRESIDENTIAL
Changing Lives
...One Student at aTime
The
SCHOLARS PROGRAM
AROUNDTHE COMMONS
NEIU is 1 of 5 Universities in
...
Students Pass
Campus GREEN Fee
Clean energy improvements at NEIU will be made
possible through a Campus Green Fee of $3 pe...
National Report Shows High Num
Ethnically Diverse Students Graduate
N O R T H E A S T E R N ’ S
MEDIAbuzzNational Report S...
... Students in kindergarten through the second
grade at several public schools on the North
and South sides of Chicago pa...
NEIU’s new vice president for Institutional
Advancement, Carla Knorowski, is off to a
running start – and it doesn’t look ...
THE CHUCK KANE MEMORIAL
Golf Outing was established in 1972 by the
Northeastern Illinois University community
to honor Pro...
BY: DANA NAVARRO
Entering college for
the first time can be
an overwhelming
experience for even
the most organized
and mot...
T
he core of this program
is a series of interactive
courses offered among
a variety of disciplines.
These courses blend t...
the more athletic students emerged as leaders.“It
created a new dynamic,” said Church.
	 The physical activities also gave...
When I attended
Northeastern Illinois
University (1966-
1971), then called
Chicago TeachersCollege North, it was a tender ...
I
t was the genesis of a performance
poetry explosion that eventually
fostered a number of flourishing
venues for oral pre...
intersectionA Point Where NEIU Colleges & Campuses Converge
Professor Emerita Audrey Reynolds, linguistics,
has created th...
COMMONground (cont.) ALUMNI NEWS & NOTES • SUMMER I 08ALUMNI NEWS & NOTES • SUMMER I 08
’65
Frederick Brill (B.S. General
...
neiu_magazine_final
neiu_magazine_final
neiu_magazine_final
Terminou este documento.
Transfira e leia offline.
Próximos SlideShares
Nmdl final
Avançar
  • Seja a primeira pessoa a gostar disto

neiu_magazine_final

  1. 1. { AN INSIDE LOOK AT NEIU’S FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE } IN CHICAGO CLOSETS! Chuck Kane MEMORIAL GOLF OUTING The MUSIC & LITERACY Project Rebirth of the SPOKEN WORD INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008
  2. 2. 15 17 D E P A R T M E N T S 3 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR 4 PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE 6 AROUND THE COMMONS I news & notes about your university community 22 STUDENT PERSPECTIVE 27 INTERSECTION I a point where neiu colleges & campuses converge 29 COMMON GROUND I alumni news & notes 34 WHO KNEW? I photo feature C O V E R S T O R Y 17 FIRST-YEAR EXPERIENCE The University recently implemented an innovative program for all incoming freshmen to help them adjust to university culture and develop their academic skills. The First-Year Experience program offers over thirty classes to students including the new anthropology course “Skeletons in Chicago Closets.” NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 6 11 F E A T U R E S 11 THE MUSIC & LITERACY PROJECT Using music to help Chicago public school students 14 ADVANCING THE UNIVERSITY President Hahs names Carla Knorowski the new Vice President for Institutional Advancement 15 ON PAR – THE ANNUAL CHUCK KANE MEMORIAL GOLF OUTING Former NEIU professor & the NEIU scholarships in his name 23 REBIRTH OF THE SPOKEN WORD NEIU’s connection to Chicago’s performance poetry scene OCTOBER 31 & NOVEMBER 1 AT 8:00 P.M.OCTOBER 31 & NOVEMBER 1 AT 8:00 P.M. ENSEMBLE ESPAÑOL ENSEMBLE ESPAÑOL In residence at Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago • Dame Libby Komaiko, Founder & Artistic DirectorIn residence at Northeastern Illinois University, Chicago • Dame Libby Komaiko, Founder & Artistic Director DANCE THEATERDANCE THEATER Northeastern Illinois University’s Office of Cultural Events Presents... Northeastern Illinois University’s Office of Cultural Events Presents... spanish dance theater Northeastern Illinois University Auditorium 5500 North St. Louis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60625 For tickets call the NEIU box office at: (773) 442-4636 Or visit: www.neiu.edu/~eespanol *Discounts available for NEIU alumni’s, seniors, students & groups • Free parking “MAGNIFICENT” Hedy Weiss, Chicago Sun-Times
  3. 3. INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 4 PRESIDENT’SImessage “Much like this magazine, new and wonderful things are happening in many areas of the University.” It is my pleasure to welcome you to the first edition of the redesigned and expanded Northeastern Illinois University Magazine. I hope you enjoy the twenty-four extra pages and modernized design that will be delivered to you twice a year. It has been over a year since I arrived at Northeastern and I continue to be impressed with all of the wonderful people, programs, and possibilities at NEIU. Much like this magazine, new and wonderful things are happening in many areas of the University. This spring we welcomed our new Vice President for Institutional Advancement Carla Knorowski. I am very pleased that she has joined our University. Dr. Knorowski oversees the areas of alumni relations, development, publications, and public relations. In addition, she is also the executive director of the Northeastern Illinois University Foundation. Dr. Knorowski’s twenty plus years of demonstrated success in public higher education advancement and other nonprofit institutional development benefit Northeastern significantly. With her lead, the University will strategically and collaboratively design programs and materials to heighten the interest in and awareness of the University’s mission and values. We must position the University strategically in the minds and hearts of our various constituencies. One of those constituencies is our legislators. Since I have arrived on campus, I have spent considerable time communicating with legislators on behalf of NEIU. In April I had the pleasure of traveling by bus with a group of thirty-two members of the University community to Springfield for Higher Education Lobby Day. Students, faculty, staff, alumni, and the NEIU Board of Trustees were all represented on the trip. We spoke to numerous legislators about NEIU’s operating budget and capital budget, including the request to build an education building on our campus. Prior to Lobby Day, in February, eighteen students from NEIU participated in the Model Illinois Government simulation and competition that took place over three days at the Capitol Complex in Springfield. The NEIU group won the prestigious Outstanding Large Delegation Award. In addition, four students were elected to serve on the State-Wide Model Illinois Government Executive Board. I am very proud that Northeastern has been well represented in Springfield in recent months. On the federal level, I traveled to Washington, D.C., as part of a Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) delegation. While in Washington, I was happy to present our own U.S. Congressman Luis V. Gutierrez with the NEIU Distinguished Alumni Award. Visiting one of our most notable alumni was an honor and made the trip even more rewarding. I look forward to sharing more NEIU happenings and news items with you throughout the coming months and years. I hope that you will share your NEIU experiences and stories with your friends and colleagues as we continue to raise the visibility of the University throughout Chicago, the State of Illinois, and beyond. Sincerely, Sharon K. Hahs President Northeastern Illinois University NEIU MAGAZINE STAFF Editor-In-Chief: Michael J. Partipilo Managing Editor: Julie Wight Associate Editor: Dana Navarro Creative Director/Designer: J. Matt Byerly Photographer: Joe L. Davis Contributors: Susan Appel Bass, Carolyn Bonner, Sheila Castillo, Gerald Chaney, Terry Jacobus, Erika Krehbiel, Anne Schultz In Common is published twice a year by the University for graduates, donors, and friends. Please send your comments, suggestions, and news items by e-mail to InCommon@neiu.edu or to the Office of Alumni Relations, Northeastern Illinois University, 5500 North St. Louis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, 60625-4699. HOW TO CONTACT US In Common Magazine: InCommon@neiu.edu Northeastern Illinois University: (773) 583-4050 Alumni Relations: (773) 442-4205 Development: (773) 442-4210 Graduate College: (773) 442-6005 Public Relations: (773) 442-4223 Transcripts: (773) 442-4031 UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION Sharon K. Hahs President Lawrence P. Frank Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Carla Knorowski Vice President for Institutional Advancement Melvin C. Terrell Vice President for Student Affairs Mark Wilcockson Vice President for Finance and Administration BOARD OF TRUSTEES Walter W. Dudycz Chair, B.A. ’93 Jin Lee Vice Chair Carlos Azcoitia Secretary Carole Balzekas Grace G. Dawson Omar A. Duque Edward G. Dykla Eduardo Arabu, Jr. Student Trustee UNIVERSITY FOUNDATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS John E. Gingell, President Jack Butler, Vice President Jonathan Stein, Corporate Secretary Thomas R. Gramins, CPA, Treasurer Andrea L. Davey Neal Fenwick Randy Franklin Catherine Kozuch-O’Brien Richard Gamble Thomas F. Power, Jr. Betty Rocci Lance D. Williams Carla Knorowski, Executive Director PRINTED BY AUTHORITY OF THE STATE OF ILLINOIS • 6/08 • 55M • PO#46823 letter EDITOR from the After many months of planning, we are pleased to bring you a new magazine that will focus on the things most important to you. The magazine has a new look, with even more quality stories and information to connect you with all the amazing things our alumni, faculty, staff, and students are currently doing. We plan to bring to you feature stories that demonstrate our commitment to academic excellence while focusing on those things that we share in common, bringing each of us that much closer and connected to NEIU. In addition to a new design and expanded content, the Northeastern Illinois University Alumni Magazine has a new name, In Common. The new name encompasses a unifying theme shared by all of our magazine readers. Though we may be diverse in a myriad of ways, we all share one thing in common - being a part of the NEIU family. In other exciting news, there are so many ways for you to now stay connected with NEIU. The Blue and Gold is Northeastern’s newly revamped electronic newsletter. It is published on a bi-monthly basis and includes the latest news, updates, and stories about the University. If you would like to be on the mailing list, just send a quick note with your name and e-mail address to alumni@neiu.edu. In addition, you can also link to Northeastern on Linked In, MySpace and Facebook. These popular social networking websites offer interactive, user-submitted networks of friends, personal profiles, blogs, groups, photos, and much more. Just click on any of the sites and search for Northeastern Illinois University. Finally, after an almost ten year hiatus, we are reestablishing the Northeastern Illinois University Alumni Association. Having the Association reestablished will bring forth more exciting ways to benefit you as an alum of Northeastern. We are even planning our first trip–a cruise through Greece! (See page 13 for more details.) In closing, I welcome any comments, concerns, or suggestions for improving the quality of the Northeastern Illinois University Alumni Magazine, In Common. You may reach me at InCommon@neiu.edu. With Regards, Michael J. Partipilo Editor-In-Chief Northeastern Illinois University Greetings NEIU Alumni & Friends, WELCOME TO THE NEW NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY ALUMNI MAGAZINE onthecover This is a cast of the skull of Sivapithecus indicus, a fossil ape found in the northern parts of India and Pakistan. Sivapithecus is approximately 8 million years old and is closely related to modern day orangutans. Studies of its teeth reveal that Sivapithecus mostly ate nuts and fruit with hard pits. THIS CAST IS PART OF THE COLLECTION IN NEIU’S ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT. Volume 1, Issue 1
  4. 4. PRESIDENTIAL Changing Lives ...One Student at aTime The SCHOLARS PROGRAM AROUNDTHE COMMONS NEIU is 1 of 5 Universities in the Nation Chosen for HACU Pilot Exchange Program Northeastern is one of the fourteen higher education institutions (five in the United Sates and the only one in Chicago) chosen to participate in a pilot program established by the Inter-American Organization for Higher Education (IOHE) and the Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU). The program provides a framework for international student exchange between partner institutions in the United Sates, Spain, Brazil, Costa Rica, Argentina, Columbia, Venezuela, Ecuador, Mexico, and Canada. Students will register for and pay tuition to their home universities and may study at their host university for up to one year. “The HACU and IOHE project offers students important opportunities to enhance their international understanding and heighten their cultural awareness,” said Janet Fredericks, dean, Graduate College, and director, International Programs. “Throughout the years, NEIU has had a consistent record of support and emphasis on the importance of providing students with opportunities for international study.” Each year, NEIU sponsors more than 150 students for study experiences throughout the world and hosts more than sixty international exchange students from partner institutions. More than 300 international degree candidates are enrolled in programs of study throughout the University. Earth Science Student Wins GEOLOGICAL SCHOLARSHIP Jeff Wawczak (B.S. ’08 Earth Science), was one of three NEIU students who won a $1,500 scholarship to attend a three-day course presented by the Midwest GeoSciences Group and the Association of Engineering Geologists (AEG) held at Fermilab and Northern Illinois University. Wawczak first learned about the short course and the five available student scholarships at an AEG meeting he attended with Laura Sanders, professor, earth science, and five other NEIU earth science students. Wawczak, Dustin Litorja (B.S. ’07 Earth Science), and Matthew Meyer (B.S. ’07 Earth Science), won three of the five student scholarships. The course, “Assessing Groundwater Movement and Contaminant Migration Through Aquitards: Hydrogeologic Characterization and Investigative Techniques,” consisted of presentations and field demonstrations on new technology, equipment, and procedures. “I feel like I have a head start on the other people in my class,” said Wawczak. “I’ve had experiences that they just haven’t had. We are the only students from our program who have actually seen a drill rig run, which is very exciting.” Additionally, Wawczak saw the course as a networking opportunity. “Being there was intimidating because I was sitting in a room with 150 people whose jobs I wanted, but they were all very friendly. They really look at you as the future of their field.” Wawczak is grateful to Sanders for providing him with opportunities outside of the classroom and helping him focus his career goals. “Being a geologist you have a lot of options when it comes to choosing a career, and meeting people who are living those options helps you to figure out what you want to do,” said Wawczak. Wawczak graduated in May and is currently exploring graduate programs in hydrogeology. “Being a geologist you have a lot of options when it comes to choosing a career, and meeting people who are living those options helps you to figure out what you want to do.” JEFF WAWCZAK (B.S. ’08 Earth Science) Junior biology major Jesse Foresto learned early on that life does not always work out according to a plan.When Foresto was five years old his mother died after a battle with cancer. His father, determined to not have his children raised by babysitters, drastically cut back his work hours so he could spend time raising his two sons and daughter. After graduating from high school a semester early, Foresto worked two jobs to help financially support his family instead of immediately enrolling in college. In 2006 Foresto applied to Northeastern and was awarded the prestigious Presidential Scholarship. “It’s a big gift being able to go to school without the worries about financial stress,” acknowledged Foresto.“I have learned that having a solid foundation is essential to success, and Northeastern is preparing me to succeed in my career.There are high standards that are demanded by NEIU to maintain the Presidential Scholarship. I want and need to make the most of my time here by working hard and developing academically.” In trying to decide a course of study, Foresto turned to his father for advice.“Right now my dad is encouraging me to continue in the sciences. I like to help people and want to do that well. I could really help people through science.” The Presidential Scholars Program at Northeastern Illinois University is changing lives. Presidential Scholarships are the most prestigious scholarships awarded by the University. They are full, merit-based awards that cover tuition, fees, and a book allowance for entering freshmen who have demonstrated academic excellence. The University hopes to double the number of Presidential Scholars by 2009.With the continued support of alumni, faculty, staff, and friends of the University this goal can become a reality. To learn how to support the Presidential Scholars Program, contact the Office of Development at (773) 442-4208 or by e-mail at alumni@neiu.edu. “Northeastern is preparing me to succeed in my career.” Jesse Foresto, Biology Presidential Scholar Northeastern Illinois University INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 6 news&notesabout youruniversitycommunity
  5. 5. Students Pass Campus GREEN Fee Clean energy improvements at NEIU will be made possible through a Campus Green Fee of $3 per semester. The University Board of Trustees voted to approve a student referendum for the fee, which was effective Fall 2007. Nearly $90,000 will be raised each year to fund projects such as a campus-wide energy audit, alternate energy sources (solar panels), lighting efficiency improvements, and increased recycling initiatives. The student organization Green Cycle Group initially proposed the idea to the Student Government Association, who passed the referendum with the support of 75 percent of the students who voted. “Passing this referendum really shows how much Northeastern students care about addressing climate change. The Board’s approval of the Campus Green Fee ensures that Northeastern will continue to be a leader in clean energy,” said Green Cycle Group member Jeremy Slate. BIKING TO CAMPUS University community members are supporting clean energy by leaving their cars parked at home and instead biking to campus. David Rubin, Facilities Management, makes his fourteen mile commute by bicycle each day. He said, “I save money on gas and car maintenance, I get in some calorie-burning exercise, and I help the environment by not polluting the air.” To promote biking to the University, there are bicycle racks at the following locations on campus: Building E - north entrance Classroom Building - north and northwest walkways Fine Arts Building - west entrance Building B - east and west walkways Science Building - west entrance P.E. Complex - north walkway The NEIU Department of Public Safety offers bicycle safety tips: • RIDE AT A SAFE SPEED & USE HAND AND ARM SIGNALS TO ALERT MOTORISTS. • REMEMBER THAT PEDESTRIANS HAVE THE RIGHT OF WAY. • WEAR A HELMET & USE BIKE LIGHTS ON BOTH THE FRONT & REAR OF YOUR BICYCLE BEGINNING AT DUSK. • NEVER LEAVE YOUR BICYCLE UNATTENDED OR UNSECURED EVEN MOMENTARILY. • SECURE YOUR BICYCLE AT A BICYCLE RACK AND REFRAIN FROM USING POLES NOT DESIGNATED FOR BICYCLES. NEIU Students Dig In to MAYA DINING HABITS Last fall, three NEIU students searched for evidence of foods that sustained the Late Classic (AD 600-900) Mayan people. Soil samples collected by Jon Hageman, assistant professor, anthropology, while working with the NEIU Archaeology Field School in Belize, were analyzed by Gardner Brandt, (B.A. ’08 Anthropology), Neeshia Macanowicz (B.A. ’08 Biology, Psychology), and Anita Fareeduddin, student, biology. The students looked for phytoliths or microscopic bodies of silica present in many plants including wild rice, beans, squashes, and gourds. Jennifer Slate, associate professor, biology, explained, “Phytoliths are very small particles, on average about 1/20 of a millimeter in size, that exist inside plant cells. If you threw a glass bottle in the ground, it would still be there in 1,000 years in most soils. The same thing is true for these little phytoliths. The plants, seeds, and stems may disintegrate, but these survive because they’re made of silica, a glass-like substance.” Hageman noted, “This kind of study requires a lot of very technical lab processes for which most archaeologists aren’t equipped.” Slate added, “Interdisciplinary work like this is relatively new, but it’s becoming more and more common. For ecologists to understand and interpret what was going on in a prehistoric environment, you need to study the people who lived in that particular environment. So more and more ecologists are working with archaeologists, who also benefit because in order to really understand an ancient culture, you must understand the ancient natural environment.” The students involved in the project actually conducted the experiments and used critical thinking skills to identify and apply best research practices, which is an experience their professors say will prepare them well for graduate study. Brandt’s experience with the project earned him an internship at the Smithsonian Institution, where he spent a month working with Dolores Piperno, the world’s top expert in the study of phytoliths. “This kind of study requires a lot of very technical lab processes for which most archaeologists aren’t equipped.” JON HAGEMAN Assistant Professor, Anthropology THE COMMONS news&notesabout youruniversitycommunity “Passing this referendum really shows how much Northeastern students care about addressing climate change.” JEREMY SLATE, Member, Green Cycle Group WALTER W. DUDYCZ Named Chair of the NEIU Board of Trustees JIN LEE NAMED AS VICE CHAIR & CARLOS AZCOITIA AS SECRETARY The Board of Trustees of Northeastern Illinois University has elected three new officers. Former Illinois State Senator and NEIU alumnus Walter W. Dudycz (B.A. ’93 Board of Governors) was elected chair, Jin Lee as vice chair, and Carlos Azcoitia as secretary. They each will serve a two-year term. Dudycz replaces Nancy J. Masterson who served as chair since September 2005. Masterson was appointed to the Board of Trustees by the governor of Illinois in 1996 and held leadership roles during her entire tenure. Dudycz, a member of the NEIU Board of Trustees since 2005, served as a state senator from 1985 to 2002 and was assistant majority leader from 1993 to 2002. He served as executive director of the Illinois Racing Board from 2002 to 2003. A retired Chicago Police Department detective, Dudycz is also former director of the Cook County Sheriff’s Alternative Program. Dudycz is a member of the Vietnam Veterans of America, the Veterans of Foreign Wars, and the Gabro Council, Fraternal Order of Police. Lee, also a member of the NEIU Board of Trustees since 2005, has been director of business planning and development for the Albany Park Community Center since 1997. Previously he served as executive director of the Chicago Korean American Chamber of Commerce. He is a member of the Human Relations Task Force of Chicago and a member of the Asian American Advisory Councils for the Illinois Secretary of State and the Illinois State Treasurer. Azcoitia, a member of the NEIU Board of Trustees since 2006, recently retired as principal of John Spry Community School. Since 2004 he has served as a member of the Education Accountability Task Force of school administrators to help shape a new Illinois Department of Education. Previously he served as Deputy Chief Education Officer for the Chicago Public Schools. He earned his doctorate in educational administration from Northern Illinois University in 1989. NEIU’s new Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Walter W. Dudycz INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 8 7 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008
  6. 6. National Report Shows High Num Ethnically Diverse Students Graduate N O R T H E A S T E R N ’ S MEDIAbuzzNational Report Shows High Number of Ethnically Diverse Students Graduate From NEIU National Report Shows High Number of Ethnically Diverse Students Graduate From NEIU According to Diverse Issues in Higher Education’s annual publication of the “Top Degree Producers 2007,” Northeastern is among the top universities in the United States in the number of baccalaureate degrees earned by students of diverse ethnic backgrounds. • NUMBER OF BACCALAUREATE DEGREES EARNED IN EDUCATION BY HISPANICS: 11TH • NUMBER OF BACCALAUREATE DEGREES EARNED IN EDUCATION BY ASIAN AMERICANS: 21ST • NUMBER OF BACCALAUREATE DEGREES EARNED IN EDUCATION BY ALL MINORITIES: 22ND • NUMBER OF BACCALAUREATE DEGREES EARNED IN ETHNIC, CULTURE & GENDER STUDIES BY AFRICAN AMERICANS: 27TH • NUMBER OF BACCALAUREATE DEGREES EARNED IN ALL DISCIPLINES BY HISPANICS: 75TH Northeastern Illinois University’s NATIONAL rankings, provided by 2005-2006 preliminary U.S. Department of Education data, are as follows: Northeastern Illinois University’s NATIONAL rankings, provided by 2005-2006 preliminary U.S. Department of Education data, are as follows: THE COMMONS news&notesabout youruniversitycommunity Northeastern Illinois University alumni have garnered five of this year’s ten Golden Apple Awards for Excellence in Teaching. Carol Broos (M.A. ’86 Music), Samina Khan (Biology), Natalie Neris-Guereca (B.A. ’02 Elementary Education: Teacher Education), Brooke Tippet Thompson (M.A. ’97 Music), and Donnell White (B.A. ’02 Elementary Education: Teacher Education) were awarded this honor, which recognizes outstanding teachers in Cook, DuPage, Kane, Lake, and Will counties. Of the approximately 200 recipients of the Golden Apple Awards since 1986, twenty-eight are NEIU alumni. NEIU has a strong tradition of educating teachers and administrators who go on to serve in the Chicagoland area; 3,800 NEIU alumni do so today. In a recent survey of NEIU College of Education graduates, 98 percent reported that they felt well prepared for their jobs one year following graduation. Terry Stirling, associate dean, College of Education, said, “These awards were established as ‘Academy Awards of teaching’ to highlight the importance of the teaching profession and to give it some of the public honor that is accorded to other professions. We know how competitive this award is and congratulate all of the winners on their extraordinary service to young people.” This year’s winners will receive a tuition-free sabbatical at Northwestern University, a personal computer, $3,000, and membership into the Golden Apple Academy of Educators. Carol Broos teaches fourth through eighth grade music at Sunset Ridge School in Northfield. She utilizes theater and technology to create an environment for discovery, opportunity, and expression in music. Samina Khan teaches sixth through eighth grade science at Clark Academic Preparatory Magnet High School in Chicago. Khan was recruited to teaching through the Global Educators Outreach program, which selected only fifty people from a pool of thousands of candidates from 23 counties. Natalie Neris-Guereca teaches fifth grade at Pershing West Magnet School in Chicago. She exhibits empathy for and confidence in her students, which helps them realize their potential to succeed. Brooke Tippet Thompson teaches kindergarten through eighth grade music at the Pierce School of International Studies in Chicago. In addition to her Golden Apple honor, she holds national certification for teaching music. Donnell White teaches seventh and eighth grade math at Clark Academic Preparatory Magnet High School in Chicago. He created an organization called Proud Young Men to help his male students overcome academic apathy. “We know how competitive this award is and congratulate all of the winners on their extraordinary service to young people.” TERRY STIRLING Associate Dean, College of Education NEIU AWARDED $2.8 MILLION in Title V Funding to Improve Retention through Academic Literacy Northeastern is the only university in Illinois to have been awarded Title V funding this year. NEIU will receive $2.8 million from 2007-2012 for the “Improving Retention through Academic Literacy” project. NEIU is one of only thirty colleges and universities in the nation to receive a Title V grant this year. Funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the Developing Hispanic Serving Institutions Program (Title V of the Higher Education Act) provides funding to Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) to build their capacity to serve Hispanic and low-income students. An HSI is defined as a non-profit institution that has at least 25 percent Hispanic full-time equivalent enrollment. The NEIU Title V project is part of the University’s strategy for addressing critical barriers to its mission as an urban university of excellence and access. NEIU, the only public four-year Hispanic Serving Institution in the Midwest, serves a highly diverse student population. NEIU will use this funding to create dozens of new writing intensive courses, at least one in every major course of study in the University. It will also address student retention and increase graduation rates by improving key academic literacy skills, creating a Center for Academic Literacy to provide tutoring services and writing support, revising the first-year writing program, and implementing student writing evaluation resources to accurately assess performance. 2008 GOLDEN APPLE Teaching Awards [ 1 ] The University’s ENLACE (Engaging Latino Communities for Education) program was featured in the April 3 issue of the nationally published Diverse Issues in Higher Education, which featured higher education institutions in Illinois. The article discussed how NEIU is helping to increase the number of Hispanic students enrolling in graduate programs and pursuing higher education teaching and administrative positions. [ 2 ] A profile in the May issue of Wind, a national Korean magazine, featured President Sharon Hahs and the University. Kyu Young Park, director, Asian Programs, also was interviewed for the story, which discussed the vibrancy of the diverse learning environment at NEIU. [ 3 ] The Chuck Kane Memorial Golf Outing was featured on June 9 on WMAQ-NBC 5’s morning television show segment “Mug Mondays.” The segment features good causes of local nonprofit organizations. [ 4 ] The Polish Daily News featured Carla Knorowski, vice president for institutional advancement, in two articles that were published on March 14 and March 21. The first story reported on the event held at the McCormick Tribune Freedom Museum to publicly welcome Knorowski and President Sharon Hahs to the University. The second article was a Q&A between Knorowski and the reporter about her new role as vice president at Northeastern. [ 5 ] Ed Stuart, professor, economics and international/ intercultural studies, appeared on CNN on March 7 to discuss which regions of the country are being hardest hit with unemployment. He also was interviewed for a segment on WBBM-AM on May 31 about the recent spike in gasoline prices. [ 6 ] Conrad Worrill, professor, inner city studies education, and director, Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies, was interviewed for a story that was published in the Los Angeles Times on March 24. Worrill discussed Barack Obama’s strategy of cultivating relationships with radical leaders while keeping his distance from their more strident positions. 9 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 10 In the spring, the University celebrated the naming of the Salme Harju Steinberg Fine Arts Center. The building was dedicated in honor of President Emerita Steinberg, who served as president from September 1995 through January 2007. NEIU Board of Trustees Chair Walter Dudycz, Board of Trustees Secretary Carlos Azcoitia, and past Board Chair Nancy Masterson presented President Emerita Steinberg with a resolution from the Board in recognition of her commitment to the arts at NEIU. Three performances followed the presentation including David Portillo, tenor, and Celeste Rue, piano; NEIU’s Brian Torosian, guitar; and Ensemble Español Spanish Dance Theater, in residence at NEIU. In addition, all of the fine arts programs at NEIU were celebrated with a student exhibit in the Art Gallery, a slide show of the Stage Center Theatre in the Recital Hall, tours of the building, and a student musical group performance during the reception. Generous contributions were made to the Endowment Fund for the Arts in honor of President Emerita Steinberg. These contributions will support quality academic and professional programming for years to come. The University’s fine arts programming has provided students and the community access to some of the top artists and performers in the world. Naming Dedication of the SALME HARJU STEINBERG FINE ARTS CENTER President Emerita Salme Harju Steinberg and President Sharon K. Hahs at the reception in the newly dedicated Salme Harju Steinberg Fine Arts Center
  7. 7. ... Students in kindergarten through the second grade at several public schools on the North and South sides of Chicago participated in the program.The performance of these students showed an increase in scores that was statistically significant in both reading and math. Schultz, creator and director of the Music and Literacy Project at the Chicago Teachers’ Center of Northeastern Illinois University, stumbled onto the idea of using music as a way to help students segue into writing when she was confronted with the most difficult class she had ever taught as a writing consultant in several Chicago public schools. One day, she marched in with paper, markers, and music.“We are going to do something different today,’’ she announced to the assembled second graders.“You’re going to draw on the paper with your markers in time with the music,” as she demonstrated what she meant with her hand in the air. She put on a Mozart Flute Quartet and held her breath, and the students’ response exceeded her wildest dreams.“They kept drawing with the entire first movement, and when it came to a close, there was silence. I held my breath and went on to the second movement, which was much slower than the first, and they continued to draw, slowing with the music; and then they continued through the third movement. They had drawn along with the entire quartet!” Schultz noticed that the music and drawing had a very strong impact on individual children. “Of all the children, Eric is the one I will never forget. He was one of the angriest children I had ever met, one of those who threw chairs, shoes, whatever came to hand. He had never written anything at all in the weeks I had been coming to class. This time, he wrote with the others. He wrote,‘My cat went up the hill. I love my cat,’ and had drawn a picture of his cat going up the hill. I was amazed; not only had he written, but he had written something tender, something that was important to him.” After this experience, Schultz experimented in other schools, using music and drawing in her teaching of writing. Eventually she added movement and came up with a continuous sequence that went from moving to music, to drawing to music, to writing and then back to reading. The sequence enabled the children to think more connectively and spontaneously, and their writing voices to become stronger, more fluent, and more confident. “Angelica was a very shy child when I first met her in kindergarten,” Schultz said.“The first time she got up with the other children to dance to a music literacy THE PROJECT & piece of music, she stood there in agony, holding her body very stiffly and she hardly moved. Her body language eloquently testified to her desire to be invisible. It was hard to watch her as she struggled. But then we asked the children to draw with the same music, just dancing in the air with their marker, then down on the paper. This was when it happened for Angelica. She drew quite easily, and when the music came to an end she finished her drawing and threw her arm with the marker still in it up into the air with a great flourish.At the same time she threw her head back, her long hair flying back around her shoulders, and she laughed out loud.” Schultz considers the often heard complaint that children are growing up without being able to write and that this is limiting their ability to think, and to become efficient members of the workforce. She believes that in order to increase the literacy rate in this country, writing must be granted a purpose beyond passing tests and getting a job.“It must be considered as an art,” she said,“a way of thinking independently that is accorded to the other arts, and that is a critical necessity in today’s on-the-move, constantly changing and adapting world.” ANALYSIS OF CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ TEST SCORES for students who participated in a three-year program linking music to reading and writing showed a noteworthy increase over the test scores of students who did not participate. Anne Schultz, accompanied by a researcher and an evaluator, presented the results of this three-year action research project at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association last year ... “We are going to do something different today!’’ ANNE SCHULTZ, Director, Music and Literacy Project NEIU Chicago Teachers’ Center BY: SHEILA CASTILLO NEIU Chicago Teachers’ Center INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 12 11 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008
  8. 8. NEIU’s new vice president for Institutional Advancement, Carla Knorowski, is off to a running start – and it doesn’t look like she will be slowing down her pace any time soon. Almost from day one, she began setting a course to establish advancement initiatives and the strategic design of programs and materials that will heighten interest in and awareness of Northeastern’s mission and values. As evidence of her swift pace, by the end of her second month, Knorowski had already held a reception downtown for 150 guests from Chicago’s business, legislative, arts, and education communities. She also spearheaded the redesign of this new, expanded alumni magazine, and set into motion plans for the re-establishment of the Northeastern Network, an external organization of NEIU alumni and friends who will serve as the University’s advocates on key legislative issues related to the University and higher education. Close on the heels of that first flurry of activity, Knorowski is collaborating with the NEIU Foundation Board of Directors to host their first Annual Meeting this fall, is preparing to give NEIU alumni a more significant presence on the web, and is putting into place the necessary institutional advancement infrastructure to continue to move the University forward. Most recently, in response to a challenge grant issued by the U.S. Department of Education as part of the Title V grant NEIU received last year, Knorowski has launched a campaign to raise $192,500 in matching funds. Monies raised in the campaign will be matched with federal funds at a 2:1 rate provided all funds are raised by January 31, 2009, and earmarked for endowment. When the campaign goal is reached, NEIU will receive $385,000 in federal matching funds to assist the University in building its endowment. (See Title V story on page 10.) Undertaking so many new tasks in such a short period of time might seem overwhelming to many individuals, but Knorowski is undaunted. With more than twenty years of experience in communications, constituent relations, and fundraising for nonprofit organizations, Knorowski is well qualified to engage in the tasks at hand. She began her career at her Chicago high school alma mater, where she established the school’s first comprehensive office of development. “It was a great grassroots experience,” says Knorowski. “I did everything from fundraising, to publishing newsletters, and planning special events. I was able to learn about fundraising and advancement from the ground up.” Her next career move was to the University of Illinois at Chicago, where she served in various capacities including director of advancement and external affairs, vice president and associate chancellor for alumni affairs, and associate dean for development and external affairs. Her most recent position before coming to Northeastern was as managing director of development for the Chicago Humanities Festival, a nonprofit organization that presents more than 150 arts and humanities programs to over 57,000 constituents annually. In each position Knorowski displayed a strong record of accomplishment and an increased level of achievement. From her first post at the high school, where she increased donations by 20 percent each year, to her most recent position at the Festival, where she was instrumental in annually raising 92 percent of the organization’s more than $3.2 million operating budget, Knorowski has continued to develop her expertise in building comprehensive advancement programs. She attributes her sustained success to a marriage between what she does best and what she loves most. “I’ve always had an entrepreneurial spirit,” says Knorowski. “But for me, it’s never been just about the bottom line. I’ve wanted to work with organizations that were committed to a higher purpose. That’s why working in the nonprofit sector has appealed to me. I’ve been able to combine my interest in business with advancing causes that I believe in.” At Northeastern, Knorowski’s institutional advancement responsibilities include overseeing development operations as well as heading the areas of alumni relations, publications, and public relations. She also serves as Executive Director of the NEIU Foundation. Knorowski believes that by managing operations for all of these divisions, she will be able to provide a seamless and unified approach to establishing a comprehensive advancement program. “I’m flattered and honored that the University community has put its faith in me and given me this opportunity to lead this vital area of operation,” says Knorowski. “Higher education has played an important role in both my personal and professional life, and I care deeply about the mission and values that NEIU, in particular, continually seeks to fulfill. I’m looking forward to the opportunity to do my part in carrying out that mission by helping build a culture of philanthropy and moving the institution forward in all areas of advancement.” THE UNIVERSITY President Hahs names Carla Knorowski the new Vice President for Institutional Advancement INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 14 Join the Northeastern Illinois University Alumni Association on this distinctive voyage across the Aegean Sea to Turkey’s historic coast and the Greek Isles and experience a region steeped in fascinating history, stunning beauty, and deep-rooted cultures. Sail in the wake of Achilles, Odysseus, and Agamemnon to legendary Troy aboard the exclusively chartered M.S. Le Diamant, one of the finest ships to cruise the eastern Mediterranean, and stroll through the ruins of Ephesus, the most intact Greco-Roman city in the world. Explore Greece’s most fabled islands, including Santorini, renowned for its pristine beaches, and Delos, mythical birthplace of deities. Gain unique insight into life in the Aegean during an exclusively arranged Village Forum with local residents, and enhance your understanding of the region’s history and cultures through educational lectures and a comprehensive series of excursions. We also invite you to join a two-night Pre-Program Option in mystical Istanbul (9/19 and 9/20), crossroads of East and West, and/or a two-night Post-Program Option in the ancient Greek capital of Athens (9/28 and 9/29). For more information please contact us by e-mail at NEIUtours@neiu.edu or by phone at (773) 442-4205. September 20 - 28, 2009 From approximately $2,995 per person (plus airfare) Island Life in Ancient GREECE Northeastern Illinois University BY: SUSAN APPEL BASS
  9. 9. THE CHUCK KANE MEMORIAL Golf Outing was established in 1972 by the Northeastern Illinois University community to honor Professor Charles “Chuck” Kane, Northeastern’s first athletic director and golf coach. His colleagues remember him as a warm and wonderful man who took great pride in his teaching. Larry Bernstein (B.A. ’71 History) reminisced of the days when he was working with Kane as a student aide.“Foremost, he was a teacher, but I can also attest to his passion for coaching. This golf outing has been a way for members of the Department of Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Athletics (HPERA) to both help students and honor their colleague and mentor Charles G. Kane.” For thirty-six years, the Chuck Kane Memorial Golf Outing has been raising scholarship funds for Northeastern Illinois University students. Today, the outing is a joint venture between the NEIU Foundation and the Department of HPERA. The net profits from this outing have endowed two scholarship funds, the Charles G. Kane Memorial Scholarship and the NEIU Chuck Kane Scholarship. In addition, funds are distributed among the College of Arts and Sciences, College of Business and Management, and the College of Education to award annual scholarships. Over eighty students have received scholarships as a result of the Kane Memorial Golf Outing. Michelle Thall (M.S. ’05 Exercise Science) was a recipient of one of the Kane scholarships. Recently, she has been making headlines as an instructor for NEIU’s HPERA department, being featured in the Pioneer Press News Star and the Wicker Park Booster. She can be seen on campus teaching her class Chicago Body Works, a First- Year Experience course (see story on page 18) that explores the human body as it relates to leading a healthy and fit lifestyle.“Being selected as a Kane Scholar means that I was fully able to experience the exercise science graduate program…learning a plethora of information while truly enjoying the learning experience.” The support of the NEIU Foundation, Inland Real Estate Group, Inc.,The Segal Company, and all of the event sponsors and golfers is instrumental in raising money for these NEIU scholarships and in continuing this tradition in memory of Chuck Kane. Stein and many others have volunteered their time to planning this year’s 36th Annual Chuck Kane Memorial Golf Outing.This year’s event will be held at the Highland Park Country Club on Monday, August 11, 2008. Registration and lunch will begin at 11 a.m. and all players will hop into their golf carts and take off with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. For more information on sponsorship opportunities, registration or general inquiries, contact the Office of Development at (773) 442-4216. 15 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 PAR On INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 16 T he Chuck Kane Memorial Golf Outing is one of the longest standing traditions that Northeastern recognizes each year. “For the past thirty-six years, the University community has come together to celebrate and honor a great man and an equally great cause,” said Jonathan Stein, a director of the Northeastern Illinois University Foundation and president at Inland Real Estate Brokerage, Inc. Stein explained,“It’s about bringing together alumni, staff, donors and friends of the University in a fun environment to help support our current students.” • THE ANNUAL • Chuck Kane Memorial Golf Outing BY: MICHAEL J. PARTIPILO
  10. 10. BY: DANA NAVARRO Entering college for the first time can be an overwhelming experience for even the most organized and motivated student. From navigating a new environment, to making new friends, to learning how to balance collegiate-level coursework along with a job, most first-year students are faced with unfamiliar territory. In an effort to immediately engage new students with the NEIU community, last fall the University fully implemented a First-Year Experience (FYE) program following a one-year pilot program.All incoming freshmen are now required to participate in this program, which incorporates coursework, community involvement, and academic advisement. One of the principal objectives of the FYE program is to assist students in making a successful transition from high school to university. Lawrence Berlin, interdisciplinary coordinator, FYE program, and associate professor, linguistics, said,“It’s all about transition.We are focusing on the academic, social, and behavioral needs of the students. It’s about bringing them to a point where they can succeed.” While many universities offer some sort of FYE program, Northeastern’s approach is unique. Instead of holding a one- time seminar at the beginning of the semester focusing on academic survival skills alongside an orientation to the school’s resources, NEIU has integrated its FYE program into the general curriculum. 1 FEATURE article INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 18 17 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008
  11. 11. T he core of this program is a series of interactive courses offered among a variety of disciplines. These courses blend the academic content with lessons that help students adjust to university culture and develop academic skills. Over thirty classes were offered last year. “We are setting the trend in how to do this,” Berlin said.“This is a way to engage the students in more cooperative learning in the classroom.And we’re not watering down the curriculum.” Adjusting to University Culture Laura Sanders, professor, earth science, who teaches the course “Chicago Rocks! Geology in the City,” added,“Many students come to us with poor academic preparation, poor study skills, or perhaps little support from their family and friends at home. Many are surprised when they find out college really is different from high school - and more difficult.” According to the 2006 National Survey on First-Year Seminars administered by the National Resource Center for the First-Year Experience and Students, universities across the country are seeing results that they attribute to their FYE programs. Many universities reported an increase in persistence to sophomore year, improved peer connections, increased use of campus services, and increased academic abilities. Identifying Learning Styles At Northeastern,faculty and staff members involved in this program directly guide students in their development of study skills. For instance, Sanders has carefully crafted her lesson plans so that the academic content is intertwined with the FYE content. One FYE topic addressed is learning styles.While some students prefer to learn from material presented visually, such as pictures, diagrams and other visual aids, some learn best by listening to a lecture. Some prefer to physically interact with materials and others are most comfortable learning by reading and writing about a topic. Sanders’ students are taught to identify their own learning preferences by studying the same material in different ways. “Students will do a reading about igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks.Then they will look at photographs and samples of the different kinds of rocks. Finally, they will interact in a group to study each type of rock in a specific way. The students then reflect on their experiences and determine their preference. As a result, they learn the geologic content but also learn an academic survival skill,” she said. Using the City as a Lab The unifying theme across all of Northeastern’s FYE courses is “Diversity in Chicago.” In addition to classroom work, students participate in fieldwork and are encouraged to utilize the many resources the city of Chicago has to offer. In many cases, the students are getting a unique view of the city. Students in the anthropology class “Skeletons in Chicago Closets” visited the Field Museum to examine bone specimens that are not on view to the public. Sanders and her class used the Bohemian National Cemetery adjacent to campus as a lab to study the different kinds of rocks used in headstones. And Breckie Church, professor, psychology, challenged her students to discuss the mental representation of artwork at the Museum of Contemporary Art. Michelle Thall, instructor, health, physical education, recreation, and athletics, teaches “Chicago BodyWorks,” an FYE class that focuses on personal fitness and nutrition. Her students conducted research for a nutrition project at local grocery stores – one had to be a large chain supermarket such as Jewel and another was an organic, health-oriented grocer such as Whole Foods. Through their research,the students learned to compare the nutritional value, availability, and prices of various foods. > continued on page 21 IN CHICAGO CLOSETS! INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 20 19 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 LESA DAVIS, Associate Professor & Coordinator, Anthropology The popularity of crime solving shows such as CBS’s CSI has made its way into NEIU’s First-Year Experience (FYE) class “Skeletons in Chicago Closets.” This introductory anthropology course, which is taught by Lesa Davis, associate professor and coordinator, anthropology, is showing students how to crack the case through the study of bones. Davis noticed that her students seem particularly interested in the forensic aspects of anthropology, where the focus is on modern- day skeletons of individuals. Students learn how forensic anthropologists can determine such traits as age, sex, race, hand-dominance, cause of death, trauma, and pathology. Clyde Snow, one of the world’s leading forensic anthropologists, visited one of Davis’ classes in November to share some of his experiences in the field. Snow has been called upon for high- profile cases including the skeletal confirmations of John F. Kennedy, King Tutenkhamen, and victims of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing and September 11 terrorist attacks. Locally, Snow does contract work for the Cook County Medical Examiner’s Office. Another unit of the course focuses on evolution. Given that there are millions of years of human and other animal remains to study, Davis said that she is able to demonstrate how evolutionary processes have shaped the lineages of modern day species. Soon after learning some of the techniques anthropologists use to study skeletal structure, Davis’ students are able to construct the lineage of certain ancestral groups. “I love to see how the students apply what they are learning. And it comes very quickly in this class,” said Davis. For instance, the students make some surprising discoveries after they learn that all mammals have the same general bone structure. Davis said, “They get cued in to looking for certain traits and are able to identify similarities in different animals.” For example, the examination of a bat wing reveals a striking similarity to the human upper-arm bone. The students were given another surprise while studying images of whale skeletons. “One of my favorite moments in this class was when I saw the look on a student’s face when he learned that whales once had legs. You don’t normally think of whales with legs, but they evolved from a terrestrial ancestor,” said Davis. In addition to studying anthropology in relation to forensics and evolution, Davis points out that the information garnered from the study of bones leads to interdisciplinary work with archaeology. She spends part of the semester working on bioarchaeology. By studying bioarchaeology, the students learn how to apply many of the same techniques used for forensic anthropology to entire populations in a past time. Davis said that her students learn what to look for in reconstructing the diet of a group as well as certain characteristics that lend an idea toward social status. While the majority of bone study occurs in the classroom, Davis’ course includes a trip to the Field Museum, where she also serves as a research associate. At the museum, the students participate in a behind-the-scenes tour of the museum. “More than 90 percent of the museum’s holdings are not on display,” said Davis. “We are able to look at skeletons of giraffe, armadillo, and others that we otherwise would not have the opportunity to see.” Back in the classroom, the students also spend some time developing skills that will help them succeed academically. Given that all the students are freshmen, one of the first lessons that Davis wants her students to learn is the need for personal responsibility. She said, “I like to take a subtle approach. I treat my students like adults and set high expectations for them. And I push the idea that they need to rise to the occasion and take responsibility for their education.” Davis also helps nurture critical thinking and analysis skills. One skill that Davis thinks is particularly important for students to have is the ability to paraphrase. “Proper paraphrasing not only helps them avoid plagiarism, but they also learn the material much better because they have to fully know it in order to put it in their own words. So I give them paragraphs to paraphrase, and they evaluate each other’s work. That way they can see how their classmates think and get different ideas on how to do this. I encourage them to be creative.” Different learning styles are also addressed in this class. In designing her curriculum, Davis was sure to include reading assignments, class discussion, and hands-on projects. She hopes that her students will begin to recognize what method works best for them. Davis also said that she is mindful of the fact that her class plays a big role in her students’ initial impression of college life. “I try to keep a laid back and fun atmosphere,” she said. “They are fully engaged and working hard, but they don’t even know they are learning. We can have a good time learning about anthropology by reading the bones.” “WE ARE SETTING THE TREND IN HOW TO DO THIS.” LAWRENCE BERLIN, Interdisciplinary Coordinator, FYE Program FEATURE article
  12. 12. the more athletic students emerged as leaders.“It created a new dynamic,” said Church. The physical activities also gave the students a chance to relax and get to know each other. Church said,“It created a bond among the students I hadn’t seen yet. They really seemed to develop a connection with each other.” Achieving Personal Growth Another objective of the FYE program is to guide students through self-reflection and personal growth.Students in Church’s FYE course “Growing Up in Chicago” spend time learning the theories of adolescent behavior and then apply those ideas to their peers and themselves. For one assignment, the students observed the behavior of random students on campus and determined what philosopher and theory would explain it. Back in the classroom, Church continued the teamwork theme and used a little creativity to assess her students’ knowledge of the material. Instead of issuing a standard written exam for the midterm, Church had groups of students present skits demonstrating the ideas of theorists such as Piaget and Erickson. “They have to really know the theorists to be able to put on the skit. If I try to simply lecture about these abstract elements, it will fall on deaf ears and not be absorbed. It needs to be learned in an egocentric way,” she said. “Many students have more time than money, so I teach them how to be smart consumers. A lot of students are surprised to learn that they can find certain products at Whole Foods for less money than at a large supermarket,” said Thall. Making New Friends In addition to creating a rich learning experience, Sanders sees fieldwork assignments as a way to facilitate personal interaction among her students. Her students work in groups to examine local sites of geological interest, including the Thornton quarry in the south suburbs, the wetlands at Gompers Park, as well as the lake shore and Chicago and Des Plaines rivers. “The course is very hands-on with lots of group interaction and field trips,” said Sanders. “As a result, the students get to know each other and, we hope, establish friendships that will see them through their time at NEIU.” Because many FYE professors are trying to foster a spirit of teamwork among their students, many have spent a class period in the Physical Education Complex participating in team-building exercises. Church participated alongside her students in a jump rope game. During this game she noted a difference in leadership among her students from what she normally observed in the classroom. Because the activities were recreational, some of 21 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 my closet door, found my blue blazer, white button-down shirt, gold tie, and the NEIU eagle lapel pin. I wanted to proudly wear NEIU’s colors during the awards ceremony. At 6 a.m. on Saturday, October 27, I set out for Springfield. When I reached the Old State Capitol Building and stood before it, I reflected on the journey that had brought me to this moment. The honor of being named as the 2007 NEIU Lincoln Laureate Scholar was both empowering and humbling at the same time. As I entered the lobby, I immediately faced an enormous staircase, which immediately made me think of ascending to even greater heights and levels of awareness. I approached the check-in table and proudly announced that I was there to represent Northeastern Illinois University. From there, I eagerly proceeded into the House of Representatives Chamber. As I walked among my fellow Lincoln Laureates and read the names of other Chicago-area universities on their name tags, my pride for NEIU grew even stronger. I kept marveling at the fact that I had been chosen to represent my university, my community. During the ceremony, my heart really began to soar with pride when the Lincoln Academy speakers announced the names of the universities being represented that day. Thoughts about diversity came to my mind. I kept thinking about the number of people on NEIU’s campus, the faculty, administration, staff, and student body, and all of the ethnicities, cultures, and ideas of our world that they represent. I was also humbled and grateful to think of how selflessly they all give their most valuable assets, time, and knowledge to one another and to their community, and how much they had given to me. When my name was called, I walked up to the Chancellor of the Lincoln Academy, John B. Simon, and the Honorable Richard Mills, United States District Court, and shook their hands. The Lincoln Laureate Medallion was placed around my neck and I became the 2007 NEIU Lincoln Laureate Scholar. I was thrilled to shake the hands of these dignitaries and to be honored by them. I was also happy that Northeastern Illinois University’s name preceded mine, and I liked the fact that the focus was placed on linking my University’s name with the award. It kept me focused on the reason that I was in that historic chamber Choosing to attend Northeastern Illinois University is one of the best decisions I’ve made in my life. My name is Gerald Chaney, and I am the 2007 NEIU Lincoln Laureate Scholar. Every year a senior from each of the 52 four- year, degree-granting Illinois institutions of higher learning is chosen to represent his or her institution as a Lincoln Laureate Scholar. The Laureates are selected by the chief executive officers of their respective colleges or universities and honored for their excellence in curricular and extracurricular activities. I remember the day that Michael Kelly, Dean of Students, who is also my former NEIU Student Leadership and Service Scholarship Mentor, e-mailed me to inform me that I had been nominated for this honor in the beginning of the fall 2007 semester. I inked ‘Lincoln Laureate Award … Springfield, IL … Represent NEIU’ into the October 27 date in my NEIU daily planner. Early in October, letters from our esteemed President Sharon Hahs and our Vice President for Student Affairs Melvin C. Terrell arrived in the mail to congratulate me on receiving the award. After I read their letters I immediately thought about how my late parents always told me to “Be efficient. Be punctual. Be personable. Be of service to your community.” Up until then, I heard what they were saying, and I did my best to follow their advice. But I was not truly listening, not fully comprehending the power and prophetic wisdom of their words. What they were telling me was to just be myself in any and every situation. As I stood that day looking up into the late afternoon sky I said two powerful words, “Thank You!” Then, I went upstairs, opened among the esteemed group of laureates: I, like the others, was a product and expression of my school’s mission statement, its philosophy, the value that it places on the personal and professional development of its students, and its commitment to excellence. The prestigious events of this day solidified my desire to serve NEIU, one that remains even after I graduate this December with a degree in Secondary Education: English Education. Knowing that we are all stewards of education helps me to remember to pause and appreciate my academic experiences within the hallowed halls, on the grounds, and with the very special people of Northeastern Illinois University. Now, with my degree in hand, I am embarking on the world, ready to serve as a leader in education and in my community. I recorded the events of this remarkable and exciting day in my journal so that I can refer to it when I need inspiration. I can think of this day, look at my Lincoln Laureate Medallion, and remember all of the good people and good deeds that have touched my life. It also reminds me of one of my greatest purposes in life: to serve the world, which I like to think of as our community. STUDENTperspective INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 22 (Pictured Left to Right) John B. Simon, Gerald Chaney, and Judge Richard Mills at the 2007 Lincoln Laureate awards ceremony The Lincoln Laureate Medallion Chaney recieved on October 27, 2007 BY: GERALD CHANEY, Student, Secondary Education: English Education Church is also trying to inspire her students to think more about what they want to do with their lives. She said,“I’m not just talking about a job. I want them each to have a dream and a passion. College is a time to figure out who you are, what you want to be, and what it takes to get there. I believe that everyone has the capacity to do well.” Discovering University Resources In addition to the FYE course requirement, first-year students are now receiving more guidance in selecting their classes.Academic advising has been extended through a student’s first forty-five credit hours, and advisers are encouraging students to decide a major sooner. By weaving academic growth with personal growth, the University is hoping to create an environment where students feel a connection to the campus community. Berlin said,“It’s not just classes; it’s all the services the university has to offer – the advising office, counseling office, lecture series, student activities.” Armed with stronger study skills, new friends, and a better understanding of the student organizations and services available on campus and throughout the city, the hope is that first-year students will feel a real connection to Northeastern and find themselves in a position that better enables them to succeed. Students in NEIU’s “Skeletons in Chicago Closets” course also participate in a trip to Chicago’s Field Museum, studying collections of bone specimens not usually on public display. Some of the other Chicago sites that are integrated into FYE course curricula include Bohemian National Cemetery, Thornton Quarry, Museum of Contemporary Art, and even Whole Foods. “THE COURSE IS VERY HANDS ON WITH LOTS OF GROUP INTERACTION AND FIELD TRIPS.” LAURA SANDERS, Professor, Earth Science FEATURE article
  13. 13. When I attended Northeastern Illinois University (1966- 1971), then called Chicago TeachersCollege North, it was a tender and volatile timefor our country.We faced the blinding shock ofthe assassinations of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,and Robert Kennedy; the stepped-up bombingsinVietnam; Chicago torn to pieces during theDemocratic Convention; and a counterculture thatwas under siege by our local and federal governments. Through this maze, in the fall of 1968, Itook some classes in African American poetrytaught by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and,United States Poet Laureate Gwendolyn Brooks.She was amazing, with an engaging, intensehonesty and immeasurable experience. She hada presence that conveyed wisdom of the rawpolitical and mental influences poetry could haveon us, our city, and our country as well. When Ms. Brooks left NEIU, the EnglishDepartment hired Ed Dorn as poet-in-residencein 1970. Dorn was more than a teacher. Hewas a guide who took students to new heightsand the art of poetry to a mystical vauntedstage. He had an incredible lineup of practicing NEIU’S CONNECTION TO CHICAGO’S PERFORMANCE POETRY SCENE OF THE Here’s how the ancient tradition of poetry got a facelift on the campus of Northeastern Illinois University.Performance Poetry or, as it is now generally known, “Slam Poetry,” was born here, bringing energy and an open-ended theatrical style to an art form that was usuallymired in academics and inaccessible to the street. INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 24 professional poets come in to read and then goto his home for shared dialogues and chemistry.He inspired us to start our own reading series,and we formed a poetry gang called The StoneWind Poets. Dorn taught at Northeastern for only twoyears, but his influence overlapped into theunconscious of his students for a lifetime.WhenDorn died in 1999, he was head of the GraduateEnglish Program at the University of Colorado.His major epic poem “Gunslinger” earned himthe title of the “Clint Eastwood of Poetry” amongthe national poetry world. The cumulative legacy of these creative writingprofessors came to fruition when we got wornout by readings that were lifeless, flat, or just plainboring.Why couldn’t poetry be entertaining,accessible, and intelligent? By the late 1970s, thedisco air left the poetry scene in a collective deadspace. Most of the hip writers/poets moved on,and their students had to get “real jobs.” Then in early 1980, something happened thatsparked a major change. Stone Wind Poet andNortheastern alum Al Simmons was tending barin a club on Lincoln Avenue when two artists/poets got into a heated argument about theirpoetry, music, and art. It almost came to blows.So Simmons, delving into the experience of hispoetic past, picked up on the confrontation andsaid to me,“I should do poetry bouts. Let ’em putup or shut up. We’ll have judges, a boxing ring,ring girls, maybe we can even make some money.It’ll give a format for competitive poetry drama.”Initially I responded,“You’re nuts,” thinkingpoetry was too sacred. But then I reflected onhow cut-throat the art world really was, with allof its posturing, pretension, and conflicted self-indulgences. Simmons’ idea suddenly seemed likea perfectly workable metaphor. When only the closest... listen &persevere TERRY JACOBUS,From The Book of God BY: TERRY JACOBUS (B.A. ’71 Secondary Education: English Education)
  14. 14. I t was the genesis of a performance poetry explosion that eventually fostered a number of flourishing venues for oral presentations. Simmons ran three “poetry bouts” in 1981, formed the World Poetry Association (WPA), and appointed himself commissioner. I was his ring announcer. I was also the Chicago correspondent for Ed Dorn’s national literary magazine Rolling Stock and reported on the quirky madness, the crowds and spontaneous energy that these literary sporting events produced. Peter Douthit, a poetry promoter from New Mexico, read my article and asked if Simmons would bring his WPA “main event” poetry bouts to Taos, New Mexico, and make them a national happening as the anchor for their annual ten- day Poetry Circus. Simmons agreed and asked me if I’d like to be the challenger in the event. I agreed in a second city second. Since the Beatniks were still in “media poetry power,” the Taos Poetry Circus named Gregory Corso (crazed Beatnik phenom who called himself “Captain Poetry”) their National Champion. So, on a Saturday evening in August 1982, Corso and I prepared to do battle in a packed auditorium as PBS cameras rolled. Just before the bout began, as I finished meditating outside the building, I entered through the back stage door and immediately ran into Allen Ginsberg. “Are you Jacobus?” “Yeah,Allen.” “I don’t know you, but you better have good poems.” “I do have good poems,Allen.” “You’d better or you’ll have to go up against me.” “Allen, that’s such an un-Zen-like thing to say.” He just glared at me, realizing I was not a “Beat” sycophant. As the bout began with weird circus energy, Corso kept interrupting me as I tried to read/ perform my work.“That isn’t poetry!” Gregory shouted.“You’re just saying something.” “Hey, Gregory, at least in Chicago we give people an even chance.” “Look kid, I’m the daddy of poetry. Did you know I was in Lucky Luciano’s cell in 1947?” I responded,“In ’47, I wasn’t born and I was a god!” My spontaneity and well-grounded foundation provided by the splendid teachers we had at Northeastern, plus my experience in previous poetry wars outside the academy, turned the tide and I was victorious. Chicago beats NewYork! I was the first National World Heavyweight Poetry Champion and won the National Max Feinstein Award for poetics.Was I worthy of such an honor? One would think such a triumph would have boosted my poetry career, but a career in poetry can be as tedious as a bluebird living in a two-cat house. In Taos, I was treated like a minor “art god,” but twenty-four hours later I was back at my job There are those you wait for There are those who wait for you And then... There are those that ACT TOGETHER TERRY JACOBUS, From The Book of God on the docks in Chicago. So it goes. But the main objective was achieved.A new energy was injected into the poetry scene.We learned that if you run a poetry reading, you might draw fifty people; if you promote a poetry performance competition, they will come.And they did, to the Taos poetry circus for the past twenty-two years.At times, the audience for the World Poetry Championship reached over a thousand! Some past champs include Sherman Alexie, Andrei Codrescu, QuincyTroupe, and SaulWilliams. In Chicago in 1984-85,Marc Smith,a talented performance poet and brilliant promoter/emcee,took the competitive bout idea and morphed it into“Slam Poetry,”which is now a worldwide phenomenon and established at the Green Mill Lounge in Chicago. Who would have thought that such a small group of Northeastern alumni could cause performance poetry to grow and expand so mightily? But it is now a part of NEIU history. Now through performance, poetry is touching more lives than ever before, especially the youth cultures worldwide. Although good or great poetry can carry itself with a silent voice on the intimacy of the page, great work read or performed to its creative potential can transform an audience and take them to another level. I have often been asked if poetry pays and if I consider myself a successful poet. My answer is that most of us pay poetry, but it expands on the generosity of the human voice and it is so free it cannot be capitalized.As for being a successful poet, I did choose the road less traveled, and that has made the difference. Currently, Terry Jacobus is a part-time adjunct professor of Oral Interpretation in NEIU’s Communication, Media, and Theatre Department and manager of Northeastern’s Mail and Receiving Services. He is featured in a textbook titled Spoken Word Revolution (Source Books), which is taught in high schools and universities throughout the country and abroad. This book chronicles and celebrates all forms, styles, and venues of the “spoken word.” He is the author of three books of poetry and one book of short stories. His newest book, titled The Book of God was published in the spring of 2007. INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 26 25 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 The Spoken Word Revolution, published in 2005 by Sourcebooks MediaFusion, is a critically acclaimed compilation of slam, hip hop, and performance poetry. Jacobus is one of over forty poets featured in this book that is now being used nationwide as a textbook in high schools and universities. St. Wind was published by Northeastern Illinois University in the ’70s when Terry Jacobus was a student at the University. It featured chapters of poetry from seven different writers including a chapter of ten poems from Jacobus. Jacobus’ book, Fine, was published in Chicago by Two Men and a Boy Press in 1989. The 163-page book is a compilation of selected poems by Jacobus and included poetry that had previously been featured in publications such as the Vancouver Review, Crosscurrents, and Rolling Stock. Published in 1997 by Stone Wind Press in Chicago, The Poet Never Loses His Girl is a compilation of many short stories written by Jacobus. The stories have been described as “prosetry” in the MAG, an international literary review. Northeastern Alumnus Terry Jacobus was the first World Heavyweight Poetry Champion defeating, the famous Beat Generation poet Gregory Corso in 1982. In addition, his poetry has been published internationally in magazines, newspapers, and literary journals. His writings have been included in five books. Four of the books are shown and described here. His fifth book, The Book of God is an electronic “cyberbook” from which excerpts have been published in the magazine, Exquisite Corpse - A Journal of Letters and Life. SPOKEN WORD in print
  15. 15. intersectionA Point Where NEIU Colleges & Campuses Converge Professor Emerita Audrey Reynolds, linguistics, has created the Audrey Reynolds Distinguished Teaching Award at Northeastern Illinois University. This $5,000 award was established to recognize outstanding teaching by faculty members who have a record of success and to inspire other faculty, especially young and new faculty members, to strive for excellence in teaching. One award will be presented annually to the member of the NEIU faculty who best demonstrates distinguished teaching. “I had heard about the Brommel Distinguished Research Award, and since we are a teaching University, I thought it was equally important to have a comparable award for distinguished teaching,” said Reynolds. Faculty members who are selected as recipients of this award will carry that designation for life, duly noted in faculty listings in their academic department and the academic catalog. Award recipients will be selected by a committee that Graduate College Seminar Series The Graduate College currently provides its students with two annual seminar series. The seminars are held on Saturday mornings during the fall and spring terms. The presenters are experts who are able to share both theoretical information and practical applications of their topic. The fall series addresses topics relative to “Transitioning to Graduate Studies.” Subjects addressed in this series include: graduate writing and research, time management, and strategies for career development and doctoral studies. The spring seminar series specifically addresses “Navigating the Work Environment” and mirrors topics that frequently are included in advanced degrees. The Graduate College completed the spring series with three seminars held in March and April. The topics covered included: staff supervision, organizational data development and analysis, and effective communication. NEIU Perspective Scholars This year the Graduate College initiated the founding group of NEIU Perspective Scholars. These are students with high potential for success who might not be able to complete graduate degrees without financial support. The students are expected to participate as graduate assistants while completing their degrees. They are also required to provide service to the University and its students. Each NEIU Perspective cohort includes one international student in order to foster global awareness and understanding. The NEIU Perspectives Fellows Society provides Northeastern Illinois University graduate students with a unique opportunity to develop their academic and professional expertise. The society provides its fellows with a context and culture that values individual talents and experience, while fostering personal responsibility. Each fellow is expected to demonstrate leadership in the promulgation of University values and the attainment of University objectives. examines evidence of student learning, a commitment to professional development activities exploring innovative teaching techniques, and recognition of the nominee’s distinguished teaching by colleagues, students, and alumni. Full-time tenured members of the NEIU faculty who are in their sixth year or more of service at the University and who typically carry what is defined as a full instructional load will be eligible for nomination. Any faculty member, administrator, student, or alumni is able to nominate members of the NEIU community who meet the eligibility criteria. No self-nominations will be accepted. The first Audrey Reynolds Distinguished Teaching Award is expected to be presented at the December 2008 commencement ceremony and is made possible through the generosity of Professor Emerita Reynolds. 27 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 28 Donn Bailey co-founded the Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies (CCICS), where he served as director and professor for 22 years. He also chaired the commission that oversaw the progress of Chicago schools’ desegregation efforts from 1986-1990. Bailey died on December 21, 2007. Bailey was a native of New Castle, Indiana, and graduated in 1954 from Indiana University (IU) in Bloomington with a major in speech and hearing therapy and a minor in speech science. He received his Masters of Arts degree in speech pathology and audiology also from IU in 1962. During 1965-66, Bailey joined Donald H. Smith and Nancy L. Arnez in the founding of the Center for Inner City Studies at Northeastern Illinois University. After receiving his doctorate in 1974. Bailey served the community and NEIU with distinction and a sustained dedication that underscored the mission of the Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies. After forty-two years in public education, Bailey retired as director but continued to teach speech communication courses as a visiting lecturer at CCICS until 2004. He was honored by the NEIU Office of Alumni Relations and Black History Month Committee with the William “Doc” Speller Award for Lifetime Achievement at the 2007 Black History Month Awards Ceremony. In June 2008 the Northeastern Illinois University Trustees voted unanimously to honor the legacy of Bailey by naming the CCICS auditorium in his memory. Donations in memory of Donn Bailey can be made to the NEIU Foundation Jacob H. Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies fund. For more information, please contact the Office of Development at (773) 442-4210. “I had heard about the Brommel Distinguished Research Award, and since we are a teaching University, I thought it was equally important to have a comparable award for distinguished teaching.” AUDREY REYNOLDS Professor, Linguistics Audrey Reynolds Distinguished Teaching Award CTC READwELL Grant The U.S. Department of Education recently awarded the NEIU Chicago Teachers’ Center (CTC) a five-year, $1.5 million grant to fund a professional development program for teachers who work with English Language Learner (ELL) students. Chicago Public Schools (CPS) is working in partnership with CTC to equip teachers with techniques to improve instruction for ELL students at two Chicago high schools, Hancock and Mather. Program director Pat Gleason, Chicago Teachers’ Center, said that while many ELL students can communicate with “social” English, a lot of them struggle with the academic language skills necessary to succeed in school. She said, “A lot of students who enter school at the secondary level really can do the math and science. They just can’t articulate the knowledge they have.” The program, called Reading Enables Academic Development with English Language Learners (READwELL), will address this problem by helping teachers more effectively provide language and literacy instruction while using discipline-specific content. “The program is a hybrid of English as a Second Language (ESL) pedagogy and content- area literacy pedagogy. We really want to marry these two,” said Gleason. Teachers, school personnel, teaching artists, and parents are participating in seminars, workshops, on-site graduate level courses, educational conferences, team-teaching opportunities, and arts integration projects at two Chicago high schools. Hancock and Mather high schools were chosen because they both have large populations of ELL students yet have very significant differences. Hancock is a very small school with a small ESL/bilingual program and a student body that is nearly 100 percent Latino. About half of the ELL students were born in the United States. On the contrary, Mather is a relatively large, multiethnic school. It has one of the largest ESL/bilingual programs in CPS high schools and serves a very high percentage of refugee students. These vast differences should allow the most effective teaching practices for ELL students, despite different backgrounds and across differing educational environments, to emerge after periodic evaluations during the five-year period. While this program is open to all teachers at Hancock and Mather high schools, the focus will be on ninth and tenth grade teachers because this transition period largely determines whether or not students stay in school and graduate. Gleason said that already nearly 150 teachers between the two schools have expressed interest in the program. The goal is to get over 90 percent teacher participation. campuswide chicagoteachers’center graduatecollege CCICS (Carruthers Center for Inner City Studies) Remembering Dr. Donn F. Bailey (1932 - 2007)
  16. 16. COMMONground (cont.) ALUMNI NEWS & NOTES • SUMMER I 08ALUMNI NEWS & NOTES • SUMMER I 08 ’65 Frederick Brill (B.S. General Education: Elementary Education) retired from AT&T as program manager, alliance channel, on April 21, 2006, after over 25 years. ’69 Edward L. James (B.A. Secondary Education: Mathematics) is director of information technology at Specialized Transportation, Inc. in Fort Wayne, Ind. ’71 Rolfe F. Ehrmann (B.A. Political Science) is a candidate for Circuit Court Judge for the Fifteenth Judicial Circuit in Illinois, which serves the counties of Carroll, Jo Daviess, Lee, Ogle, and Stephenson. He is a founding partner and attorney at Ehrmann Gehlbach Badger & Lee in Dixon, Ill. In 1980, he was admitted to the Bar of the United States Supreme Court. Clarence H. Krygsheld (M.A. Inner City Studies, M.A. Guidance and Counseling: Secondary School) and his wife Faye Krygsheld were featured on NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams for a segment titled “Couple overcomes racism, follows their hearts.” Cathy S. Kush (B.A. Linguistics) retired after teaching 35 years in the Chicago Public Schools. During her career she taught at Avalon Park School, Mark Sheridan and Robert Healy School. For the last sixteen years Kush was a computer lab teacher, focusing on teaching technology as a tool in the classroom. ’72 Michael F. Altfeld (B.A. Political Science) was selected to become a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University for the academic year 2007-08. He will be working on a book whose current title is Re-thinking Nuclear Weapons. He also recently published a short article in NBC REVIEW, the Journal of the U.S.Army Nuclear and Chemical Agency titled “Why MAD was Insane.” Yvonne (Kasper) Hogan (B.A. Psychology) earned a Master of Education in Educational Leadership from Northern Arizona University in Flagstaff,Ariz. She is a senior systems analyst and workflow administrator in the Information Technology Department for the City of Glendale in Arizona. ’73 Jessica Lippman (M.A. S Special Education) is an instructor in clinical psychology and behavioral sciences at Northwestern’s Feinberg School of Medicine and has specialized in child psychology for almost 30 years. She co-wrote Divorcing with Children: Expert Answers toTough Questions from Parents and Children, her second book. Wallace D. Williams (B.A. Political Science) was awarded the 2006 International Olympic Committee Trophy - Sport and the Community. He is also a member of the University of theVirgin Islands Athletic Hall of Fame. ’74 Nancy A. Kuta (B.A. Early Childhood Education) earned a national board certification as aYoung Adult Library Media Specialist. She is a teacher and librarian at Juanita High School in Kirkland,Wash. Ron Zagorski (B.A. Secondary Education: Mathematics) was inducted into the Illinois High School Baseball Coaches Association Hall of Fame on February 2, 2008. ’75 Sharon Susan Rakowski (M.A.T. English: Literature) was recently appointed director of human resources for the Adams Group of Companies, headquartered in Elmhurst, Ill. She will be implementing the company’s first- ever human resource department. Marylene Smith-Whitehead (B.A.English) and Rufus Hill presented This Far By Faith, their award- winning musical, at the New McCree Theatre in Flint, Mich.Whitehead is an international award-winning playwright, author, and a poet. She is a part-time playwriting teacher at eta Creative Arts Foundations in Chicago. ’76 Carol (Dase) Gardner (B.A. Special Education: Elementary) retired in June 2007 after twenty- six years as a school psychologist in Liberty County, Ga. Ronna L. Glickman Sharp (B.A. Early Childhood Education) earned her Master of Education in Administration and Supervision from Loyola University in May 2005. She was appointed national coordinator for Accountability and Research Alternative Unlimited, Inc. ’77 William Torres Cruz (B.A. Secondary Education: Spanish) earned an Ed.D. from Interamerican University of Puerto Rico. He is a school superintendent for the schools of Humacao in Puerto Rico. Mylah (Eagan) Deliford (M.A. Mathematics: For Elementary School Teachers) retired as a teacher from DunbarVocational Career Academy in Chicago in June 2006 after thirty-seven years of service with the Chicago Board of Education.The last eighteen years of service were at Dunbar Vocational Career Academy. Renee Fliss (B.A. Special Education) started in the Mortgage profession in 1980. She teaches Sunday School at Harvest Bible Chapel, Naperville, IL. Gerald R. Gems (B.A. Secondary Education: Physical Education) published his fifth book, The Athletic Crusade: Sport and American Cultural Imperialism, with the University of Nebraska Press, 2006. ’78 Richard P. Davis (B.A. Psychology) is newly married. His new book, The Core, was just accepted for publication at Tate Publishing. He has also received a Doctor of Sacred Literature degree fromTripp Bible Institute in cooperation with Garrett- Evangelical Theological Seminary and Northwestern University. Louise (Liffengren) Hullinger (M.A. Special Education:Teaching ChildrenWith Learning Disabilities) is a writer and the author of Next Year Country: Stories of Drought-Stricken South Dakota in the 1930’s. She is also the author of A Day to Cry by Mary Grigar:AsToldTo Louise Hullinger and Special Children: Special Families. ’79 Elizabeth McInerney (B.A. Early Childhood Education) was honored as Teacher of theYear for 2006. She is a teacher in Zebulon, N.C. and has been teaching for twenty years. ’80 David J. Hollander (B.A. Secondary Education: Spanish) and three co-workers raised over $7,500 as participants in the 2006 Accenture ChicagoTriathlon. Hollander is co-owner of Hollander International Storage and Moving Company, Inc., his family business since 1888, in Elk GroveVillage and Chicago. Alan J. Schullo (B.A. Business & Management) is fire chief for the Homewood Fire Department in Homewood, Ill. Prior to that position he was fire chief for the St. Charles Fire Department from 2002 to 2007. He earned a master’s degree in organizational behavior from Benedictine University in Lisle, Ill. ’81 Timothy Courtney (M.A. English) earned his Ed.D. in education, curriculum and instruction, from Northern Illinois University in December 2006. 29 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 INAUGURAL ISSUE 2008 NORTHEASTERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY I magazine 30 Taking care of business ... and the COMMUNITY BY: SUSAN APPEL-BASS Dan Chookaszian (B.S. ’03 Business and Management) has successfully melded a strong spiritual life with the pursuit of business. As managing broker of the American Street Mortgage Co., Chookaszian spends nearly sixty hours a week working to build his business. Yet despite his demanding work schedule, he still finds time every week to devote to community service and his church. Chookaszian described his NEIU experience as invaluable. “The classes I took at Northeastern shaped my thinking,” said Chookaszian. “I also had the good fortune to spend many hours outside of class getting to know my professors. It was very rewarding.” Chookaszian’s interest in business was initially cultivated when he was a student at Northeastern. He was particularly interested in strategic management, and through the Honors Program he had the opportunity to work closely with a number of faculty members on special projects. He said, “It took learning to another level.” Chookaszian credits these opportunities with helping him apply abstract theories to concrete situations. For his senior thesis he applied the theories he learned in class to examine two small businesses – one that succeed and one that failed. “The strategic management theory was very directly related to the success rate. And working on this paper definitely helped me in graduate school; I wasn’t intimidated by all the writing.” After Chookaszian completed his degree at NEIU he was planning to join his father in the family manufacturing business. However, his father decided to sell the business, which left Chookaszian free to pursue other avenues. He elected to follow another one of his passions – ministry work – by attending the Moody Bible Institute, where he received a master of divinity degree. After completing his divinity degree, Dan Chookaszian was primed to pursue his ministry work full-time. But a close childhood friend invited him to help build a newly- established mortgage company. Uncertain of what choice to make, Chookaszian consulted his uncle, who convinced him that he could apply all the skills he had learned to become successful in business and his ministry work at the same time. That was more than two years ago. Since then Chookaszian and his business partner have built a company whose mission is to serve the public through hard work and loyalty and to give back to the community through charitable contributions. Through those contributions he continues to expand the volunteer work he was doing with his church. In addition to volunteering in soup kitchens and for the Ronald McDonald House, Chookaszian and his colleagues are working toward raising money to help people who are about to go into foreclosure on their homes. On August 2, American Street Mortgage Co. will hold a three-on-three basketball tournament in Chicago and will donate all the proceeds to families who need help making their mortgage payments. Chookaszian also continues to give back to Northeastern through mentoring opportunities. Toby Williams (B.A. ’04 Communication, Media, and Theatre), a graduate student at Northeastern, is training to be a mortgage planner with Chookaszian at American Street Mortgage. In addition to giving Williams an opportunity to get practical work experience, Chookaszian also tutors Williams on the material he needs to learn for the broker licensing exam. “I am very thankful for Dan’s friendship and encouragement,” said Williams. “He’s also helped me professionally by giving me the opportunity to intern at his company. It has been a great experience and I think the world could use more good and caring people like Dan.” alumnispotlight COMMONground WE WANT TO HEAR FROM YOU! Our class notes of alumni, former students, and faculty are compiled from information submitted to our Alumni Affairs Office or our website at www.neiu.edu. Contact us to let us know what you’re doing! Our listings are edited for length, but our website features an expanded version of our news and notes. “I am very thankful for Dan’s friendship and encouragement.” TOBY WILLIAMS Student, Communication, Media, and Theatre

Vistos

Vistos totais

435

No Slideshare

0

De incorporações

0

Número de incorporações

5

Ações

Baixados

5

Compartilhados

0

Comentários

0

Curtir

0

×