O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

4

Compartilhar

Baixar para ler offline

PET Grammar Unit 15: Modal for permission and Phrasal verbs with GET

Baixar para ler offline

PET Grammar Unit 15: Modal for permission and Phrasal verbs with get, Original lesson by matifmarin

Audiolivros relacionados

Gratuito durante 30 dias do Scribd

Ver tudo

PET Grammar Unit 15: Modal for permission and Phrasal verbs with GET

  1. 1. 1 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 Permission: Can is often used to ask for and give permission. ● Can I sit here? ● You can use my mobile if you like. ● Can I make a suggestion? →We can also use may and could to ask for and give permission but can is more common. Permission = It’s alright □ can □ allowed □ may □ permitted To express permission, prohibition, obligation and No obligation we usually use modal verbs.
  2. 2. 2 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 REMEMBER!! The word “to” is used after allowed and permitted, but not after can or may. You aren’t allowed to enter You aren’t permitted to enter You can’t enter You may not enter ● You aren’t allowed to enter. ● You aren’t permitted to enter. ● You can’t to enter. ● You may not to enter. Can is more informal, may and permitted are more formal, and allowed is neutral.
  3. 3. 3 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 To express PAST and FUTURE We use: 1. COULD or WAS / WERE allowed (in the past): ● When I was a child, I was allowed to stay up until 11 p.m. at weekends. 2. WILL BE allowed (in the future): ● You’ll be allowed to choose your partner for the Speaking test in the Cambridge exam. ● We won’t be allowed to use a dictionary in the exam.
  4. 4. 4 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 What’s the difference? ● Must and required are more formal than have to and need to. REMEMBER!! Don’t use “to” after “must.” [modal + bare infinitive] We can use Supposed to / Not supposed to“light” requirements and prohibitions – for example, rules that are often not followed. Sonia Marc Maria Sergi Do we have to learn it or you mean we must learn it? Do I need to think about it? ● We’re supposed to arrive on time, but it’s OK if we’re a little late. ● The students aren’t supposed to use their mobile phones in the class, but a lot of them do so anyway.
  5. 5. 5 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 Obligation = It’s necessary □ have to □ need to □ must □ required Obligation: Have to is often used to ask for and give permission. ● You have to show your passport at the airport. Notice that we can use the have to expression in all tenses, for example: I have to (present), I have had to (present perfect), I had to (past simple), I will have to (future) Use of Have to: In general, have to expresses impersonal obligation. The subject of have to is obliged or forced to act by a separate, external power (for example, the Law or school rules). Have to is objective. Look at these examples: ● In England, you have to drive on the left. ● In England, most schoolchildren have to wear a uniform. ● Most businesmen have to wear a tie at work. In each of the above cases, the obligation is not the subject's opinion or idea. The obligation is imposed from outside.
  6. 6. 6 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 In the affirmative have to / must both express the idea of obligation. (It is necessary that you do something.) However, must is only used in the present, and is never used after 'will' or 'may.' I must / have to get up early because I start work at 8 a.m. I will must / have to leave work early if the snows torm continues. In the negative only the verb have to (do/does not have to) expresses the idea of obligation: (It is not necessary that you do something.) You don't have to pay for children. They can come in for free. In the negative must (must not / mustn't) is similar to an imperative: Do not do something: You mustn't smoke in the corridors. (= Don't smoke in the corridors.) Must (subjective obligation) We often use must to say that something is essential or necessary, for example: ● I must go now. ● I must stop smoking Have to (objective obligation) We often use have to to say that something is obligatory, for example: ● Children have to go to school. □ We can use must to talk about the present or the future. Look at these examples: ● I must go now. (present) ● I must call my mother tomorrow. (future) → We CANNOT use must to talk about the past. We use HAVE TO to talk about the PAST. → I had to go because it was too late. Must or Have to
  7. 7. 7 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 SUMMARYSUMMARY
  8. 8. 8 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 11
  9. 9. 9 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 Laura Núria Twins Alba and Sandra 22
  10. 10. 10 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 ANSWERS: 1. Complete the sentences: 2. don’t have to pay 3. mustn’t smoke 4. have to / must drive 5. have to 2. Must – have to – has to 1. The twins Alba and Sandra have to go … 2. Laura hast to do the … 3. Núria must buy … 4. Laura must feed … 5. Núria hast to prepare … 6. The twins Alba and Sandra must go … 7. The twins Alba and Sandra must clean .. 8. Laura has to read … 9. The twins Alba and Sandra must return …
  11. 11. 11 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 VOCABULARY: Phrasal verbs with "get"
  12. 12. 12 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 The most common Phrasal verbs with "get" and definitions 1.Get acros = to communicate. = to make someone understand something. (Especially if the details are too difficult to understand or if the person being explained to understands poorly). EXAMPLES: ●Although I couldn't speak the language, I managed to get my meaning across when necessary. ● Your meaning didn't really get across. ● He's not very good at getting his idea across. 2. Get along - Get on with A. = to have a good / friendly relationship with someone. (get on is used more in Britain) EXAMPLES: ● Even though there are six of them sharing the house, they all get on well with each other. ● He doesn't get along well with his mother-in-law. ● Our new boss is very easy to get on with. B. = continue doing something EXAMPLES: ● Don't watch TV, just get on with your homework! ● Stop talking and get on with the job, there is lots to do. 3. Get around A. = to become known. To spread or to circulate. If news or information gets around, people tell other people, so that soon many people know about it. ● It's a small place, so news and gossip get around pretty quickly. ● The news of his arrest got around quickly. ● News soon got around that Matthew was back in town. B. = to find a way of avoiding a difficult or unpleasant situation, so that you don't have to deal with it. ● There is no way of getting around it - you are going to have to tell her the truth. ● Isn't there any way of getting around the regulations?
  13. 13. 13 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 4. Get at A. = to reach, to access to something. ● The cupboard is too high for me to get at. ● The reports are locked in the cabinet and I can't get at them. B. = to suggest something indirectly, to imply. (used only in the continuous tense) ● What exactly are you getting at? (=trying to say, suggest) The most common Phrasal verbs with "get" and definitions 5. Get away A. = to go away from someone or something ● Get away from me! ● Get away from that cake! ● It was so busy that Marta couldn't get away from the phone all day. B. = to escape from someone who is chasing you. ● They tried to get away from the police but they weren't quick enough. C. = to have a holiday. ● We hope to get away for a couple of weeks around Christmas. 6. Get down = to cause someone to be depressed. ● This weather is getting me down. ● Don't let these problems get you down too much. 7. Get down to A. = to reach the point of dealing with something. B. = to begin to work on something seriously. To give serious attention to something. C. = to finally start doing something, after you have been avoiding it or after something has prevented you from doing it. ● Now, let's get down to business ● It's time I got down to some serious work. ● Once it is Summer, we will get down to painting the house.
  14. 14. 14 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 The most common Phrasal verbs with "get" and definitions 8. Get over A. = to recover from something or return to your usual state of health or happiness. ● I thought he would never get over her illness. ● It took her a long time to get over their separation. ● He never got over the shock of losing his wife. B. = to overcome or deal with or gain control of something. ● She can't get over her shyness. 9. Can't get over = to be amazed or surprised by something. ● I can't get over how much your kids have grown.  EndEnd
  15. 15. 15 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 EXERCISE on Phrasal verbs with "get" A. Match the phrasal verbs with their meaning and then translate them to your language: B. Fill in the gaps using phrasal verbs in the correct form: Thanks to Bob Wilson
  16. 16. 16 PET by Matifmarin. GRAMMAR – UNIT 15GRAMMAR – UNIT 15 EXERCISE on some Phrasal verbs with "get" ANSWER KEY A. 1.e 2. c 3. b 4. a 5. d Possible translation: 1.e. salir con alguien / encuentro romántico 2. c. subir a un vehículo / embarcar 3. b. llevarse bien con alguien 4. a. conectar por telf. / comunicarse 5. d. levantarse  EndEnd
  • BeckyTaylor33

    Dec. 2, 2018
  • DanaCLopez

    Jul. 12, 2018
  • MartaLucasCocho

    Sep. 26, 2017
  • DouglasWobin

    Apr. 29, 2017

PET Grammar Unit 15: Modal for permission and Phrasal verbs with get, Original lesson by matifmarin

Vistos

Vistos totais

647

No Slideshare

0

De incorporações

0

Número de incorporações

28

Ações

Baixados

36

Compartilhados

0

Comentários

0

Curtir

4

×