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Understanding the Self - The Sexual Self

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Understanding the Self - The Sexual Self

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This is a short report about the sexual self through the interrelation of biology, psychology, and social factors. Some pages would not make sense as they only consist of images where I explained concepts verbally. Peace. I hope you find this still informative.

This is a short report about the sexual self through the interrelation of biology, psychology, and social factors. Some pages would not make sense as they only consist of images where I explained concepts verbally. Peace. I hope you find this still informative.

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Understanding the Self - The Sexual Self

  1. 1. GE 1: Understanding the Sexual Self
  2. 2. Let's go Menti! "SEXUALITY" What comes to mind?
  3. 3. What is Sexuality? One of the fundamental drives behind a person's feelings, thoughts, and behaviors. Biological Social Psychological Relationships Sexual behavior Gender Sex
  4. 4. BIOLOGICAL SEX (n) : label “assigned sex” includes sex organs, such as ovaries—defining what it is to be a female—or testes— defining what it is to be a male.
  5. 5. BIOLOGICAL SEX (n) : label “assigned sex” includes sex organs, such as ovaries—defining what it is to be a female—or testes— defining what it is to be a male. https://slideplayer.com/slide/8444970/26/images/13/Primary+Sex+Characteristics%3A+Reproductive+organs.jpg
  6. 6. BIOLOGICAL https://slideplayer.com/slide/8444970/26/images/13/Primary+Sex+Characteristics%3A+Reproductive+organs.jpg Generally, females and males have the same hormones (i.e., estrogens, progesterone, and testosterone), but their production sites, their blood concentrations, and their interactions with different organs, systems, and apparatus are different (Svechnikov & Söder, 2008). Sex hormones
  7. 7. Biological Sex
  8. 8. Biological Sex
  9. 9. Biological Sex Intersex
  10. 10. Intersex - term used when a person is born with reproductive or sexual anatomy that doesn't fit the typical definitions of female or male. (i.e. hormones, chromosomes, and internal/external reproductive structure) - describe people with differences of sex development. Difference of Sexual Development (DSD)
  11. 11. no vaginal opening labia that do not open a penis without a urethral opening a smaller penis than expected a larger clitoris than expected An intersex infant may have: estimated 1.7% of the population is born with intersex traits.
  12. 12. no vaginal opening labia that do not open a penis without a urethral opening a smaller penis than expected a larger clitoris than expected An intersex infant may have: estimated 1.7% of the population is born with intersex traits. Adolescence stage: secondary sex characteristics have unusual development or absence of it (e.g. menstruation, male breast growth)
  13. 13. no vaginal opening labia that do not open a penis without a urethral opening a smaller penis than expected a larger clitoris than expected An intersex infant may have: estimated 1.7% of the population is born with intersex traits. Adolescence stage: secondary sex characteristics have unusual development or absence of it (e.g. menstruation, male breast growth) Adulthood: Discover upon trying to conceive, while others may find out during an unrelated medical procedure. (e.g., having no uterus, undescended testes).
  14. 14. "Most people are unaware of the biological complexity of sex and gender, while it may seem dichotomous, in reality, there are many intermediates." - Dr. Eric Vilain, director of the Center for Gender-Based Biology at UCLA (2015)
  15. 15. Gender Identity PSYCHOLOGICAL Sexual Orientation
  16. 16. Gender identity Refers to how you feel inside and how you express your gender through clothing, behavior, and personal appearance regardless of your assigned sex.
  17. 17. Gender identity Refers to how you feel inside and how you express your gender through clothing, behavior, and personal appearance regardless of your assigned sex. CISGENDER – People who identify with their sex assigned at birth
  18. 18. Gender identity Refers to how you feel inside and how you express your gender through clothing, behavior, and personal appearance regardless of your assigned sex. TRANSGENDER – People whose gender identity do not coincide with their sex CISGENDER – People who identify with their sex assigned at birth
  19. 19. Sexual Orientation It pertains to the gender(s) you’re sexually attracted to and want to have relationships with. Sexual orientations include gay, lesbian, straight, bisexual, and asexual.
  20. 20. Alfred Kinsey Sexual Behavior in the Human Male (1948) Sexual Behavior in the Human Female (1953) - diverse range of sexual behaviors and experiences reported by participants in his research. Kinsey Reports:
  21. 21. Alfred Kinsey People do not always fit into exclusive heterosexual or homosexual categories.
  22. 22. Sexual Orientation Heterosexual - People attracted to a different gender often call themselves straight Homosexual - People attracted to people of the same gender (gay and lesbian) Bisexual - attracted to both men and women often call themselves bisexual. Pansexual/Queer - People whose attraction regardless of gender (male, female, transgender, genderqueer, intersex, etc.) Asexual - people who don't experience any sexual attraction for anyone.
  23. 23. SOCIAL Gender Roles Gender Stereotypes Human Relationships
  24. 24. Gender Roles a set of social expectations about behaviors, characteristics, and thoughts for what is considered masculine and feminine. (how we’re expected to act, speak, dress, groom, and conduct ourselves based upon our assigned sex.)
  25. 25. Gender Roles a set of social expectations about behaviors, characteristics, and thoughts for what is considered masculine and feminine. (how we’re expected to act, speak, dress, groom, and conduct ourselves based upon our assigned sex.) • Gender stereotypes - stereotype is a widely accepted judgment or bias about a person or group — even though it’s overly simplified and not always accurate.
  26. 26. Gender Roles a set of social expectations about behaviors, characteristics, and thoughts for what is considered masculine and feminine. (how we’re expected to act, speak, dress, groom, and conduct ourselves based upon our assigned sex.) • Gender stereotypes - stereotype is a widely accepted judgment or bias about a person or group — even though it’s overly simplified and not always accurate. • Sexism - Stereotypes about gender that cause unequal and unfair treatment because of a person’s gender.
  27. 27. SEXISM lies at the root of gender inequality. It affects women and girls disproportionately. Sexist jokes Excluding Participation Comment on appearance Rigid gender roles Shaming Rape / Sexual Harassment Condoning violence against women
  28. 28. Gender Sensitivity It is a process by which people are made aware of how gender plays a role in life through their treatment of others It all starts with respect...
  29. 29. Sexuality: Human relationships - innate need for social connection
  30. 30. Triangular theory of LOVE - Robert Sternberg Intimacy feelings of closeness, connectedness, and bondness Passion feelings and desires that lead to physical attraction, romance, and sexual fulfillment Decision/Commitment feelings that lead a person to remain with someone and move toward shared goals
  31. 31. Triangular theory of LOVE - Robert Sternberg https://cms.sehatq.com/public/img/article_img/memahami-komponen-dan-bentuk-cinta-dalam-triangular-theory-of-love-1625123724.jpg
  32. 32. Masters & Johnson Sex Behavior Research: Human Sexual Response
  33. 33. William Masters & Virginia Johnson (1966) Laboratory research of Measured Physical and Sexual arousal Nearly 10,000 sexual acts of research data people having intercourse in a variety of positions or masturbation, manually or with the aid of a device.
  34. 34. William Masters & Virginia Johnson (1966) https://www.consumerhealthdigest.com/wp-content/uploads/human-sexual.jpg
  35. 35. CONCLUSION Human sexuality is viewed in three domains: Biological, Psychological, Social.
  36. 36. CONCLUSION Human sexuality is viewed in three domains: Biological, Psychological, Social. Gender sensitivity strives to understand the role of gender and ways to confront sexism.
  37. 37. CONCLUSION Human sexuality is viewed in three domains: Biological, Psychological, Social. Gender sensitivity strives to understand the role of gender and ways to confront sexism. Sexual behavior plays a role in human relationships as part of the sexual self.
  38. 38. question “If you can talk to a friend, which part of today’s lesson would you share and why? “

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