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Website Evaluation - Executive Guide

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Evaluating Your Website:
An Executive’s Guide
i c t u s m a r k e t i n g . c o m
BUSINESS OBJECTIVES
DRIVE WEBSITE DESIGN
www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 2
ICTUS STRATEGIC
MARKETING
For a long time, I thought the only thing I was built to do was teach and play music. Then I fel...
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  1. 1. Evaluating Your Website: An Executive’s Guide i c t u s m a r k e t i n g . c o m
  2. 2. BUSINESS OBJECTIVES DRIVE WEBSITE DESIGN www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 2
  3. 3. ICTUS STRATEGIC MARKETING For a long time, I thought the only thing I was built to do was teach and play music. Then I fell into a marketing position for a non- profit ministry that took me to three different continents and an MBA degree. I’ve been hooked on marketing ever since. After working within companies and not-for-profit organizations for nearly a decade, I decided to start my own firm. I wanted to work with more clients and a greater variety of marketing challenges. If you’re reading this guide, I started Ictus for people like you. My experience in teaching has greatly influenced my perspective on marketing. Companies that are focused on teaching people new things about themselves or their industry are ahead of the marketing game. People no longer wait for information to come to them. They go and get it. And the companies that build websites that teach, provide insights, or otherwise make themselves useful are going to win the trust and purchase decisions of their market. Thanks for downloading this guide. I hope it helps you think about your website differently. If you have questions or if you think I might be able to help you in any way, please don’t hesitate to contact me. I want to help. – Mark Leonard, Principal www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 3
  4. 4. How to Use This Guide Strategic Elements Visual Elements Content Elements Functional Elements User Interface Elements Search Engine Optimization Website Assessment Scorecard CONTENT 5 6 7 9 11 13 15 17 www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 4
  5. 5. I wrote this guide for business owners and executives who know they should be thinking strategically about their web- site, but have never taken the time to dig into the question, what makes a website effective? My purpose is to be helpful, to give you value. Delivering val- ue is a core principle at Ictus Strategic Marketing. It’s the rea- son I started the business. It’s why I want to work with clients. If you’re not delivering value to your target customer, you’re not really marketing anything. Your website has everything to do with delivering value to your customer and therefore, it should be a big part of your strategic marketing plan. If your company has a website that needs an update, but you don’t know where to begin, this guide is for you. If you’re starting a new company and you’d like to build a website, but you don’t know how to think about what makes a website effective, this guide is for you. Reading through this docu- ment will help you understand what is important in modern website development. It will also help you communicate your needs to the web designer and developer that you hire to build your site. Evaluating Your Website: An Executive’s Guide takes you through six primary elements to consider when evaluating your web- site. Each primary element is broken down into smaller sub- elements that will help clarify how to use a website as the homebase in your online presence, and speak the same lan- guage as your web development team. Once you understand these six elements, use the scorecard at the end of this document as an evaluation tool to evaluate your company website. If you have questions after reading these pages and thinking through the current state of your website, call me. I’m here to help. And if you’re wondering if you should hire Ictus Strate- gic Marketing to help you align your website with your busi- ness objectives – the answer is yes, you should. ICTUS MARKETING PRINCIPLE: DELIVER VALUE Marketing is more than interrupting your target market with messages. If you’re not delivering value, you’re not really marketing anything. HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 5
  6. 6. Strategic Elements LEAN YOUR LADDER AGAINST THE RIGHT WALL Clarity of Purpose Your website should be purposeful. You should know why you need it, who it is for, and how you would like to use it to help meet your business objectives. There should be perfor- mance metrics that you are tracking against your website’s goals. This is the first and most critical step in designing an effective website. Do you know the answers to these ques- tions? • Which business objectives is your website meant to affect? • For whom is your website built? • What value does your website deliver to your target market? Tracking There are a lot of tools to track basic website performance. Use one of them, but make sure you are tracking metrics that are relevant to your business’s goals. Do you have a set of performance metrics that you are tracking? Performance Against Objectives You’re in business to help people (I hope) and make money (I would guess). Why take the time and spend the resources to build a website if it doesn’t directly affect what you’re trying to do in your business? Your website is basecamp for your online presence. Every other online channel – social media, PR, email – should lead people back to basecamp. All roads should lead to your website. Why? Because that is where you can tell your story and deliver the most value to your target market. Do you know how your website is currently performing against the goals and purpose that you set for it? CAMPAIGN WEBSITES Campaign websites are built with a laser focus on purpose and reaching objectives. They are built to engage people in their campaign, collect email addresses, collect dona- tions, and clarify their political platform. There’s too much at stake for politicians to create a fuzzy, indistinct website. Business executive should strive for this type of clarity. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 6
  7. 7. A website’s appearance is often what most people (includ- ing most executives) focus on when evaluating a website. You are not wrong to think about the appearance of your website. It should be appealing and easy to look at. The mistake is to fail to think through how the visual elements of your website tell your brand’s story consistently and effectively. The visual elements of your site should be strategically fo- cused on consistently communicating your Brand Vision. Your Brand Vision is how you would like your customers to think about your company. A strong brand is an asset that is difficult for competitors to imitate, and thus provides a dura- ble and sustainable advantage. A brand is more than a logo. A brand is a place in the consumer’s mind full of associated meanings that are triggered when they see your website, your logo, or your company name. Is there anything inherently “safe” about the Volvo logo? No, but that’s what you think of when you see the Volvo logo. What about Apple? What comes to mind when you see the Apple logo – a fruit with a single bite out of its side? The an- swer probably depends on how you already feel about the Apple company. Are you an Apple Fan or an Apple Hater? The brand’s meaning comes from your experience with the com- pany and its products, not from the logo itself. Colors Colors should match the corporate color palette to support brand recognition and recall. If you have purchased a stock website template this issue will require some time and effort to align with your company’s brand identity. Visual Elements TELL YOUR BRAND’S STORY AND CREATE A DURABLE STRATEGIC ADVANTAGE OVER THE COMPETITION If you’re looking for a guide to help you be more strategic about your brand identity and how to make it a stronger asset for your company, ask me to send you my Brand Development Guide. It’s a quick 7-question document that will help you think about what your brand communicates to your target market. Do you see a logo? No. But you probably know what brand this is. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 7
  8. 8. Typography The fonts of the website should be con- sistent throughout, and should be part of your company’s corporate brand identity. Avoid using more than two typefaces. Images It’s not a matter of how many images are on each page of your website. De- pending on your industry and the story you are trying to tell, your website may be image heavy or image light. But all websites should use images effectively to meet the website’s strategic objec- tives. Are you using images to tell your brand’s story? Are the images blatant stock images that communicate noth- ging in particular? Would your target audience see themselves in the images on your site? Video When used well, video can be a dynam- ic and engaging element in your web- site. When used poorly, it can distract from your site’s goals. Are the videos on your website supporting other con- tent, and are they relevant to what the user is searching for or trying to learn? Your Brand Vision is how you would like your customers to think about your company. A strong brand is an asset that is difficult for competitors to imitate, and thus provides a durable and sustainable advantage. Your Logo is NOT your brand Your logo is the visual mark that, over time, will bring to mind all of the experiences (good or bad) that customers have with your company. It will trig- ger associations in your customer’s mind. It is only part of developing an effective brand strategy. FREEDOM Harley Davidson wants you to believe that when you ride their motorcyles, you will feel free – free of rules, problems, respon- sibilities. Every image, video, and color on their website is selected to support this brand message. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 8
  9. 9. Content ElementsIT’S THE REASON PEOPLE COME TO YOUR WEBSITE, DON’T DISAPPOINT THEM Use your content wisely when you build your website. Too many executives fail to be purposeful with the content they use for their site. Instead they throw up some tired, old text from the print brochure they made three years ago because they know they have to have something – anything – up on their site. The content on your site should help your customers, tell your brand story, teach people something they want to learn, and deliver value. Don’t waste people’s time with content that has no purpose. Video Video is important for today’s websites to be effective. Pe- riod. Full stop. Are you using video to tell your brand story, educate your audience, add value to your market? If you are, great! It’s very likely helping people find your website through search engines like Google, Bing, and Yahoo, too. About Us Section This is an important section of your website, because it is one of the first places a person will look to learn about you and decide whether you are the answer to their question. This section should actually be more about your target audience and their needs than about you. Does your about section give insight into how you can help your customer segments? Have you made it about them and their needs rather than about you? Copywriting All of the copy on your website should be written by someone who has a talent for communicating through writing. Most likely, all of your leads and most of your customers will go www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 9
  10. 10. SIT OR SQUAT Charmin will tell you where to find the nearest public restroom Charmin, the ones who make toilet paper, provides an excellent example of youtility. They created a mobile app that will locate the nearest public restroom with information on whether it is “sit-worthy” or “squat-wor- thy”. Now that’s useful marketing. to your website and read a portion of it. Based on what they read, they will form an impression of your qualifications to help solve their problem. Your website is an important piece of writing for your business. The writing should be free of typos and mistakes in grammar. It should be as concise as necessary, and above all, it must communicate effectively. No fluff! Relevancy One of the fastest ways to convince website visitors that your company is not the solution they are looking for is to serve them irrelevant content. Think of how hard you’ve worked to lead people to your site only to disappoint them with stuff they care nothing about. If you’re like most businesses, you’re not a one-trick pony. You sell different things to different types of customers. So think about how you can build content into your site that speaks to your various customer segments. Think about why each customer segment is coming to your website. A car dealership will have people coming to the web- site to shop for cars. But other people will come to the site to learn about regular maintenance and repairs that can be done at the dealership. Still others may come to the site be- cause they want to know what kind of financing is available for them. A wise dealership owner will make sure there is relevant content for each type of visitor. Freshness This is an easy element for companies to evaluate, and there- fore, it’s one of the easiest elements to criticize. But remem- ber, your site is built for your target audience, not for you. Evaluate your site’s freshness from their perspective, not yours. For example, maybe some of the images on your site are 18 months old and they feature employees who are no longer with the company. Will your target audience know or care? There’s no real need to devote resources to updating those images. However, if the information on the site has changed, or if the images appear dated and irrelevant, then it’s time to freshen things up. Key questions: Is your site promoting events that have passed? Does it have a “What’s New” page with content older than three months? Does your site look like it was designed more than four years ago? Is it mobile responsive? Youtility Youtility is a marketing book written by Jay Baer. I’m steal- ing this concept from him. In essence, Baer argues that good marketing is useful. He writes, “What if instead of trying to be amazing, you just focused on being useful?” Have you built a website that you believe will be useful to your market? If not, then you’re just like everyone else, and that’s exactly where you don’t want to be. Be different. Help people – for free. That’s how you’ll emerge from the middle of the pack. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 10
  11. 11. Functional Elements NOT JUST A PRETTY FACE: MAKE YOUR SITE WORK FOR YOU You don’t hire people to stand around your office and look pretty. Nor should you build a website that doesn’t work for you. Of course your site’s purpose includes brand strength- ening, market positioning, and education; but it should also do some heavy lifting. Your website should collect data and give you information about who your next customer might be. It should sell some- thing for you, make transactions, or qualify leads. Your web- site is part of your sales team, and it’s time to expect it to perform that way. So as you evaluate your website, ask yourself how many leads the site has collected for you in the last month? Is it giving you information that allows you to act on potential new business? If you’re not satisfied with your site’s sales performance, there are some basic tools to consider adjusting – lead hooks, calls to action, and forms. Do you have them? Are they work- ing properly? Can they be improved? Lead Hooks Lead hooks are incentives for users to engage with you in ex- change for their contact information. Downloadable papers, guides (like this one), slideshows, and e-books are common examples. Depending on your business, you may also want to offer personal consults, a physical gift, product samples, or a purchase discount. It should go without saying that YOU MUST HAVE CONTENT WORTH GETTING. So start there. Do you have effective ways to incent your target audience to take another step toward your company? Are you measuring the performance of those incentives? Calls to Action Does every page have a call to action? It should. Every area of your website should invite users to engage a little further with your company. They should be invited to dig deeper into the site, share something with their network, download something for free, read more about a topic, subscribe, or pick up their phone and call someone from your company to talk about their issue 1-on-1. It is a mistake to believe that the only action worth asking for is a purchase action. This is not true, and operating un- der this mindset will hurt you in the long run. Instead, use a framework called, See-Think-Do introduced by marketer, Avinash Kaushik. The See-Think-Do framework segments your website visitors into three different consideration stages: • See Stage – This person is browsing. They are not looking for anything in particular, and they are just bumping into www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 11
  12. 12. Modative Architects This architecture firm in Los Angeles uses HubSpot, a paid online marketing tool, to deliv- er free downloadable resources to website visitors. According to Hubspot, the company has nearly tripled its site traffic and dramatically increased the number of leads they get from their website. Their formula: Create content people want, package it in digital form (lead hook), create forms to capture information, and ask people to take action on every page of their site. products and/or services that look interesting to them. • Think Stage – This person is at the point where they are thinking about getting the thing that you sell. In other words, they are researching, collecting information from various sources, and beginning to evaluate options. • Do Stage – This person is ready to buy. They know what they want. It’s time for a transaction. When you look at each area of your website, are there calls to action for each of the three consideration stages? To dig into this framework more deeply, please read Avinash Kaushik’s original post. Asking people to take another step is an important function of your website. You should be think- ing about how every square inch of it encourages people to take action whether it’s to click on another link, subscribe to a newsletter, or add something to a cart. Forms If you’ve created a website that is more than just a brochure on the internet, then you will likely use a few forms. We’ve all filled out online forms to subscribe to something, get something free, or com- plete a purchase. You should be using forms as a way to capture information about the visitors who are most interested in what you have to offer. How do you know they are interested? Because they’re willing to take the time to fill out a form to get some- thing from you. Do the forms on your site work? Do they pass the collected information to the appropriate database or email address? Are they easy to use and as brief as possible? Will they work well on any device? Content Worth Getting Help People Lead Hooks e-books, consults, guides Call to Action Subscribe, Share, Follow, Buy Information Exchange Forms Unlock Your Lead Generation Machine www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 12
  13. 13. There are some websites that are just frustrating to deal with. It’s difficult to find things, or it’s difficult to get back to where you were just a couple of clicks ago. Or you notice that the site just looks wrong – images are cut off or they’re on top of the text that you’re trying to read. If you’re on one of those frustrating websites, you’re probably not going to stay long. These are problems that most executives are not equipped to solve. Nevertheless, every executive should be ready to recognize them and find someone who is capable of solving them. If you don’t, you are losing leads and customers with- out even knowing it. Mobile Optimization The verdict is in and mobile is here to stay. Your target mar- ket uses their cell phone or tablet to access the internet. I guarantee it. Your site must be optimized to look good, function properly, and be easy to use on any device. Not long ago, companies would have to create two websites – one for traditional desk- top computers, and a second for the small screens on mobile phones. This is quickly going out of style, however. For most companies, a single website that has been made to be mobile responsive is the right choice. A mobile responsive website adjusts according to the di- mensions of the screen it detects. It’s like squeezing a bag of marbles. The marbles slide around each other to find a new space as the shape of the bag changes. On a mobile respon- sive site, the layout of the content adjusts and rearranges it- self automatically depending on the screen’s size. In addition to giving people a good website experience on their phone, now is the time to consider whether you might be able to help your target market with a mobile app. In some industries, consumers prefer to interact with a company through an app on their phone rather than a full website. Do you have a mobile responsive website? Do you have one or more functional apps for your company? As far as prepar- ing for an internet on any device, yesterday was on time; to- morrow is too late. It’s one thing to lose a sale and know exactly why. But it’s deadly to lose sales without even knowing it. The experience that people have with your website can make or break your chance at converting them into a customer. Take the time to evaluate how easy it is for your typical customers to use your website. User Interface Elements MAKE IT EASY FOR VISITORS TO INTERACT WITH YOUR COMPANY THROUGH YOUR WEBSITE www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 13
  14. 14. Navigation Getting around on your website should be easy and intuitive. Each page of content should lead to further pages of interest logically. Whether you have a large website with hundreds of pages or a small site with a couple dozen pages, the naviga- tion should progress naturally. Breadcrumbs Breadcrumb links help people understand where they are in the site’s navigation map. They are an aid to people who find themselves deep inside a website. The breadcrumbs help them return to a higher level in the site hierarchy. This can reduce the number of steps it takes for a person to get to a previous page or section of the site, which may im- prove the user’s experience and encourage them to dig into more content. There is some debate over whether breadcrumbs are still necessary or stylish. There are other ways to help people find their way back to previous sections of a complex site. In the end the priniciple is to make it easy on your website visitors. Browser Rendering Every website, underneath its hood, is simply a set of in- structions to the browser (Internet Explorer, Firefox, Safari, etc.). The instructions tell the browser how it should display the content. And every browser reads those instructions a little differently. So it’s important to check that your site is displayed properly on all of the popular browsers. Have you looked at your website on 2-4 different web browsers? Do they look good and function correctly on all of them? This represents a 35% year-over-year growth of tablet owners in the U.S. This trend shows no sign of slowing down. With the majority of Americans using their phone to go online, every business website must be mobile optimized. Specifically, this is the number of U.S. cell phone owners who use their phone to de- cide whether to visit a business. 39% Americans who own a tablet in 2014 63% U.S. cell owners who use phone for web access 70% Use phone to get info on a specific business More than 6 in 10 Ameri- cans Own a Smartphone According to Edison Research, 61% of Americans 12+ now own a smartphone—up from 53% in 2013 and 44% in 2012. “For Millions of Americans, the smartphone has become the first screen.” – Tom Webster, Edison Research Source: Pew Research Internet Project, Mobile Technology Fact Sheet www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 14
  15. 15. Search Engine Optimization People find websites by using search engines. So it’s impor- tant to build a website with awareness of the principals on which the search engines operate. Notice that I did not say that websites should be built for search engines. Websites should be built for people. People make customers, not search engines. Search Engine Optimiation (SEO) is an elusive animal to hunt with any long-term consistency. Why? Because the major player, Google, is continuously re-jiggering its algorithms. Google makes rules that SEO experts start to follow and then Google changes the rules. This happens almost weekly. In addition, the whole idea of a search engine is becoming more and more complex. When asked to name three search engines, most of us will list Google, Yahoo, and Bing as the first to come to mind. But there are lots of other “search en- gines” that are used by millions of people every day. Youtube, iTunes, Yelp, and even Siri on your iphone – these are all engines that help us search for information online. Once you start thinking about all of the ways in which we look around for information on the web, you begin to see the SEO game as one that cannot be won easily or with any degree of long-term certainty. For this reason, I recommend that businesses create great websites that help people in their target market solve prob- lems. This is, by far, the most sustainable way to get the search engines to like you. That said, there are some best practice standards to be aware of when you are evaluating your website’s SEO strength. When done correctly, these elements will simply help search engines understand what your site is all about so that it can do its job – help people who are searching for specific infor- mation (maybe your information) on the web. Never buy into any tactic that is meant to trick search engines into ranking your site higher. It won’t work. There are armies of really smart engineers whose only job is to sniff out those tricks and thwart them by changing the rules. Headers & Subheaders One of the elements that most search engines are looking for on a site is the text of headers and sub-headers. If used prop- erly, headers and sub-headers summarize and organize the content on a webpage. Therefore, search engines use head- BE AWARE OF, BUT NOT A SLAVE TO THE RULES OF SEO Don’t buy into any tactic that is meant to trick search engines into ranking your site higher. It won’t work. There are armies of really smart engineers whose only job is to sniff out those tricks and thwart them by changing the rules. Create a website that helps people. The search engines will reward you for it. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 15
  16. 16. Google Algorithm Changes Google changes its search algorithm 500-600 times every year. You can find a chronological list of all of Google’s updates beginning in 2000 at MOZ.com. Keep up with the latest updates in search news from the resources on the left. ers and subheaders to figure out what the page is all about. Is your site using headers and sub-headers to call out or or- ganize important information? Is it using the proper coding elements – h1, h2, h3 to do so? Sitemap.xml File A sitemap is a file that lists all of the pages on your website and shows how they’re organized. Google and other search engines may read the sitemap file to better understand your website, which may help your site rank better in the search results. Google recommends sitemaps for websites that are new or very large. Use of Schema Some of the big search engine companies got together to cre- ate a standardized way to include information about websites that their robots can understand. They call this information Schema. It’s data that you don’t see on the front of a website, but it’s there – hiding and waiting for a search engine spider to come across it. It’s like a dog whistle for search engines. Schema is not a silver bullet for page one ranking on search results (there is no such silver bullet, by the way), but it can help in the long run. Think of it as a best practice in website building. Does your site have Schema data under its hood? Performance Optimization A highly optimized website runs smoothly and quickly. The pages and images load quickly and are cached whenever pos- sible. Search engines like sites that are optimized for speed. How would you grade the speed of your website? Keywords Search engines look for keywords on each page and each ar- ticle of content you post on your website. There is a lot of dis- cussion regarding how much weight Google and other search engines give to keywords these days, but there is no doubt that using appropriate keywords for your content is a best practice in website maintenance. Are you taking the time to add keywords to your content? URL Structure Are your page urls logical and readable? Were they created for humans to read? Search engines smile on urls with real words and simple structures, while they frown on urls with a mess of symbols that don’t make sense to a real person. Meta Titles & Descriptions Like keywords, meta titles and descriptions are types of in- formation that search engines use to understand what your website or webpage is all about. It takes a little effort, but taking the time to write descriptions and meta titles for each page of your website is a best practice. This information may not have an immediate or direct impact on your site’s rank- ing, but it is probably the information that will display on a search results page when it is found, so it is wise to put some thought into writing these descriptions. www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 16
  17. 17. WEBSITE ASSESSMENT SCORECARD Print This Page Using a scale of 1-10, rate each element of your website. If you don’t know, circle the 1. Refer to the previous pages to clarify ex- actly what you’re evaluating for each element. If the element is more of a yes or no answer (eg. does your site use breadcrumbs? yes/no), circle the 1 for “no” and the 10 for “yes”. Graph your category averages on the next page. Strategic Elements Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Clarity of Purpose 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Tracking 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Performance Against Objectives 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: Visual Elements Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Colors 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Typography 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Images 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Video 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: Content Elements Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Video 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 About Us Section 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Copy Writing 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Relevancy/Youtility 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Freshness 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: Functional Elements Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Forms 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Calls to Action 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Lead Hooks 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 17
  18. 18. 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Strategic Visual Content Functional User Interface SEO AverageCategoryScore Evaluation Elements Graph Your Category Averages User Interface Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Mobile Optimization 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Navigation 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Breadcrumbs 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Browser Rendering 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: SEO Rating (Circle One) Very Poor Very Good Headers & Sub- headers 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Sitemap.xml file 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Use of Schema 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Performance Optimization 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Keywords 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 URL Structure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Meta Titles & Descriptions 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Average: www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 18
  19. 19. THANKS I hope reading this guide was helpful. Writing it helped me clarify my thoughts on corporate websites as part of a company’s mar- keting mix. Thank you very much for taking time to read this guide. If you have any feedback or suggestions for improvement, I would love to hear from you. Please send an email to mark@ictusmarketing.com or give me a call at 909.583.3045 and tell me what you think. If you listen to podcasts, please consider adding the Ictus Marketing Podcast to your play list. I have a blast doing the podcast. It’s about business, marketing, entrepreneurship and anything else that interests me. If you have a suggestion for a topic or podcast guest, I want to hear about it. I’m always up for interviewing new and interesting people on my show. Finally, if you’d like to connect with me on Twitter, my handle is @mark_leonard. I’m also on Linked-In, but I usually connect only with people that I’ve met in person already. Perhaps that’s a good excuse for us to grab coffee sometime. Thanks again for supporting what I’m trying to do with Ictus Strategic Marketing. I hope to hear from you soon. – Mark Leonard, Principal www.ictusmarketing.com n mark@ictusmarketing.com n phone: 909 583 3045 19
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