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CREDIBLE SOURCES OF INFORMATION.pptx

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CREDIBLE SOURCES OF INFORMATION.pptx

  1. 1. CREDIBLE SOURCES OF INFORMATION Mark Joshua D. Roxas, MAEd, LPT Co-Curricular Activities Coordinator, Senior High School Assistant Professor IV, College of Arts, Sciences, and Education
  2. 2. Where do you usually get the information about the things that you are curious about?
  3. 3. Then, you may be a victim of Information Disorders. Misinformation Disinformation Malinformation
  4. 4. In Journalism, there are 10 principles that must be observed… • Verification • Objectivity • Originality • Completeness • Transparency • Fairness • Restraint • Humanity • Accountability • Empowerment
  5. 5. In Verifying sources… Credibility vs. Reliability Credible - the quality or power of inspiring belief Reliability - high standards of researching, fact-checking, accountability, and ethical reporting
  6. 6. In Verifying sources… •Primary Sources •Secondary Sources •Tertiary Sources
  7. 7. Types of Sources: Primary and Secondary (Keys for Writers by Ann Raimes) • Primary: Firsthand, raw, or original materials that researchers study and analyze. • Involves consulting historical documents, visuals, journals and letters, autobiographies, memoirs, government statistics and studies, and speeches. • Involves examining works of art, literature, and architecture or watch or listen to performances and programs. • Involves study or initiating case studies or scientific experiments and take extensive field notes. Conduct interviews and use data collected from questionnaires
  8. 8. Secondary Sources • Analytical works that comment on and interpret other works, such as primary sources. Examples include reviews, discussions, biographies, critical studies, analysis of literary or artistic works or events, commentaries on current and historical events, class lectures, and electronic discussions.
  9. 9. Verifying and evaluating sources is just like a walk in the PAARC •Purpose •Accuracy •Authority •Relevance •Currency
  10. 10. Purpose: Why does the information exist? • What is the purpose of the information? to inform? teach? sell? entertain? persuade? • Do the authors/sponsors make their intentions or purpose clear? • Is the information fact? opinion? propaganda? • Does the point of view appear objective and impartial? • Are there political, ideological, cultural, religious, institutional, or personal biases?
  11. 11. Accuracy: How Reliable, Truthful, or Correct is this Info? • Where does the information come from? • Is the information supported by evidence? • Has the information been reviewed or refereed? • Can you verify any of the information in another source or from personal knowledge? • Does the language or tone seem biased and free of emotion? • Are there spelling, grammar, or other typographical errors?
  12. 12. Beware of predatory sources of information!
  13. 13. How are the arguments structured? Toulmin’s Model of Argumentation
  14. 14. Wikipedia: Why do your professors say NO? • Articles may be heavily biased, incomplete, or vandalized. • May contain obvious oversights or omissions. • Many contributors do not cite their sources. • Bibliographies are frequently incomplete or out-of-date. • Credentials of authors vary. • Continually edited - >100,000 edits/day. • Can propagate misinformation.
  15. 15. Wikipedia: How to use it as a tool • Useful for background information. • Contains many viable links and references. • Excels in topics on current events, popular culture, emerging technology, and obscure subjects. • Don’t CITE it! Cite sources it links to, if you find them to be credible, accurate, useful, etc.
  16. 16. Authority: Who is the Source of the Info? • Who is the author/publisher/source/sponsor? • Are the author's credentials or organizational affiliations given? If yes, what are they? • What are the author's qualifications to write on the topic? • Is there contact information, such as a publisher or e-mail address? • Does the URL reveal anything about the author or source? examples: .com .edu .gov .org .net
  17. 17. Types of websites Every website ends in a Top Level Domain (often shortened to TLD) which tells you the type of website you’re looking at. • .com = commercial • .edu = educational • .gov = government • .net = network or alternative to .com • .org = not-for-profit
  18. 18. Relevance: The Importance of the Info to Your Needs • Does the information relate to your topic or answer your question? • Who is the intended audience? • Is the information at an appropriate level (i.e. not too elementary or advanced for your needs)? • Have you looked at a variety of sources before determining this is one you will use?
  19. 19. Currency: Timeliness of Info • When was the information published or posted? • Has the information been revised or updated? • Is the information current or out-of-date for your topic? • Are the links functional?
  20. 20. The SOURCES Framework Scrutinize the Fundamental Source Organize Thoughts Understand the Context Read Between the Lines Corroborate and Refute Establish a Plausible Narrative Summarize Final Thoughts Waring, S. M., & Scheiner-Fisher, C. (2014).
  21. 21. After gathering and evaluating sources… Do not forget to acknowledge your sources! Do not take ownership of something that you do not own. Plagiarism is a crime. REPUBLIC ACT NO. 8293 - “Intellectual Property Code of the Philippines.”

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