O slideshow foi denunciado.
Seu SlideShare está sendo baixado. ×

Change management models

Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Anúncio
Carregando em…3
×

Confira estes a seguir

1 de 10 Anúncio
Anúncio

Mais Conteúdo rRelacionado

Diapositivos para si (20)

Semelhante a Change management models (20)

Anúncio

Mais recentes (20)

Anúncio

Change management models

  1. 1.  A Health Care Change Initiative team up by Public Sector Support  Improving the working process (Vaasa, Laiha and Vohakyro)  Sampling technique identify problems and finding the appropriate model to support the collaborative innovation management for organizational sustainability and continuous improvement.
  2. 2.  Casual attitude towards collaboration  Innovation possible only with more workforce  Senior junior relation issue  Lack of time and eagerness.  Trust level is visible between supervisor and colleagues within the department but not outside the dept.  Work process delays due to lengthy hierarchical control  Meetings required long early notice  Resources allocation is a major issue  Quality of service can be improved by providing telemedicine, ehealth, epromotion.
  3. 3.  Kurt Lewin 1951  Unfreez  Change  Refreez • This Model Identify that the majority of the people prefer to function within zones of comfort. • Easy to use major companies prefer it to enact major changes. • But Its time consuming • Last step is criticized because of permanent sealing. • Not suitable in current scenario for being too simplified for relatively modern work like Laiha and Vohario; complex ego issues.
  4. 4.  Kubler Ross 1969 • An Individual’s reaction to the change is well captured • Not all change is bad, but this model consider the worst reaction to the change, • Difficult to identify the transition • Difficult to apply to a group • Not useable in current scenario for being too regid and being too emotionally deep. All employeed cann’t experience all stages.
  5. 5.  Kotter’s 8 steps 1996 • Clear steps which can give guideline; preparing and accepting change • Fits well into the culture of classical hierarchies. • Can be useful to get the maximum from key employees. • It a top down model, no room for co-creation or participation. • Can lead to frustration among employees if the stages of grief and individual participation cannot be taken to consideration. • Although it’s a very rational model but not suitable for OSUVA, it is similar to lewins model
  6. 6.  William Bridges 1991 • To understand how people feel psychologically as change happens. • Highlights the difference between change and transition. • Must be used with kotter’s 8 steps or lewin’s model. • Change happens to people and transition happens inside people’s mind when they are presented with the change • But this model is not suitable for OSUVA though.
  7. 7.  Mckinsey 7-S • Combines rational and emotional components • Offers a holistic approach to understand an organization • Understanding the system change and its effects • All parts are interconnected. • One Fails all fails. • Create a fundamental cultural change
  8. 8.  ADKAR 1998 • Provides a clear management check list to manage a change • Provides that the individual change, not the organization • Encapsulates the business dimension and individual change • Missing out on the role of leadership to create clarity and provide directions to change. • Emphasis on process of change not the people get affected by change. • Suitable in current scenario as it has the ability to judge the readiness among employees is required because the employees had developed strong resistance for the change. • ADKAR offer an option of barrier point.

×