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FEBRUARY 2015

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The Boyce Community College of Allegheny County/Boyce Campus
Monroeville, PA
Vol. 47 Issue 4 Wednesday, FEBRUARY 11, 2015
...
Page 2 											 Wednesday, February 11, 2015
The Boyce
Collegian
Editorial/
Production
Coordinator
Peggy K. Roche
The B...
Page 3 											 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Perspectives
Rare Trip Home to Morocco
Story and wedding photo
by Meriem Be...
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FEBRUARY 2015

  1. 1. The Boyce Community College of Allegheny County/Boyce Campus Monroeville, PA Vol. 47 Issue 4 Wednesday, FEBRUARY 11, 2015 CCAC Celebrates Black History Month Collegian Boyce Campus • CD Series - Monday thru Thursday beginning 2/9 • Monday, 2/16 and 2/23 – "Great Black Innovators" • Tuesday, 2/17 and 2/24 – "Voices of Civil Rights" • Wednesday, 2/11, 2/18 and 2/25 – "Barack Obama from his Childhood Years to his Historic Election" • Thursday, 2/12, 2/19 and 2/26 – "The Tuskegee Airmen" • Musicians Calvin Price and the Steel Pan Band: DATE TBD:Location and Time TBD • Black History Month Wall Display: Ongoing Homewood-Brushton Center • Will highlight African Americans who have contributed to not only African Ameri- can society but American society as well. We will select one each week and will have posters and handouts. Allegheny Campus • Film – “Lincoln”: 2/12: SSC Auditorium, 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. • Film – “Hidden Colors, Part III”: 2/16:Followed by an open discussion about the documentary: SSC Auditorium, 12 p.m. • Speaker, Mr. Clayton Adams, great-great-great grandson of Solomon Northup, who published his first-hand account of slavery in 1853 and whose story is the focus in the film “12 Years a Slave”: 2/18, 11 a.m.: Followed by Luncheon • Speaker and Activist, Mr. Khaleed Rahim will discuss Black Liberation through the political process: 2/20: SSC Auditorium, 11 a.m. West Hills Center • Speaker, Chaz Kellem, Manager of Diversity Initiatives for the Pittsburgh Pirates: 2/11: Room S1308, 12 p.m. – 1 p.m. • Film - “Mandela Long Walk to Freedom”: 2/18: Cafeteria, 11 a.m. • Film - “Remember the Titans”: 2/25: Cafeteria, 11a.m. South Campus • Taste of Africa: 2/11: Regional African food tasting – everyone invited: Mezzanine, 11 a.m.– 1 p.m. Listing of Black History Month Events and Activities SEE LISTINGS BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS, PAGE 4 CCAC hosts spring job fairs throughout Allegheny County PITTSBURGH—The Community College of Allegheny County will host job fairs begin- ning March 4 and continue through April 8 at its four campuses in Allegheny County. Representatives from many of the region’s employers will be on hand to discuss dif- ferent job opportunities, answer questions and provide information. The job fairs are open to the public with the exception of those on March 10 and 24 which are limited to CCAC students and alumni of the OTA/PTA program and Nursing program. CCAC South Campus Spring Job Fair Date: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 Time: 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Location: Gymnasium (G502), CCAC South Campus For more information, including a list of participating companies and organizations, con- tact South Campus Job Placement and Career Services at 412.469.6214. CCAC North Campus Spring Job Fair Date: Wednesday, March 25, 2015 Time: 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Location: Atrium, CCAC North Campus For more information, including a list of participating companies and organizations, con- tact North Campus Job Placement and Career Services at 412.369.3632. CCAC Allegheny Campus Spring Job Fair Date: Wednesday, March 18, 2015 Time: 9:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m. Location: Foerster Student Service Center, 2nd Floor, CCAC Allegheny Campus For more information, including a list of participating companies and organizations, con- tact Allegheny Campus Job Placement and Career Services at 412.237.2545. CCAC Boyce Campus Spring College Expo & Job Fair Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2015 Time: 9:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Location: Student Union, CCAC Boyce Campus For more information, contact Boyce Campus Job Placement and Career Services at 724.325.6771. Allied Health OTA/PTA Job Fair for CCAC Students & Alumni Date: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 Time: 4:30 p.m.–6:30 p.m. Location: Student Union, CCAC Boyce Campus SEE SPRING JOB FAIRS, PAGE 4 Fall 2014 Dean's List.....Page 5
  2. 2. Page 2 Wednesday, February 11, 2015 The Boyce Collegian Editorial/ Production Coordinator Peggy K. Roche The Boyce Collegian is the official newspaper of the Boyce Campus of the Community College of Allegheny County. Opinions expressed in this newspaper do not necssarily reflect those of the faculty or the administration of Boyce Campus. Contact Information CCAC/ Boyce Campus 595 Beatty Road Monroeville, PA 15146 724.325.6730 E-mail: proche@ccac.edu Letters Policy Readers are encouraged to submit letters to the editor by print or e-mail. ALL letters must include the author’s name and telephone number for verification. No letters will be printed without the author’s name. The Collegian reserves the right to edit such material. A drop box is located outside The Collegian Office, Room N-570. Advertisng Policy The Collegian reserves the right to reject advertising which it considers objectionable and inappropriate for a college student newapaper. Advertisements that discriminate by race, creed, color, handicap, age or sex will not be accepted. Perspectives In This Issue Sammi Allegro Meriem Benikhis Gyn Bradford Kalina Gardiner Xenia Guthrie Liz Hand Elizabeth Johnston Frank Kaufman Leelavati Murthy Linda Neubauer Pamela Nichols Barbara Poppa Renee Sissler Joseph P. Young Bike Share Movement Being Tested in Pittsburgh Transport with Health Benefits College Nondiscrimination Policy The Community College of Allegheny County (CCAC) and its Board of Trustees are committed to the principle of equal opportunity in education and employment for all. CCAC does not discriminate based upon race, color, religion, national ori- gin, ancestry or place of birth, sex, gender identity or expres- sion, sexual orientation, disability, use of a guide or support animal due to disability, marital status,familial status, genetic information, veteran status or age. Creating, supporting and sustaining a diverse community prepares our students to be effective in the world outside of CCAC. Questions may be addressed to diversity@ccac.edu. Notifications of nondiscrimination and contact information can be found at www.ccac.edu, search keywords “notifications of nondiscrimination.” Individuals with disabilities who are requesting accommoda- tions should contact the Supportive Services for Students with Disabilities Office at 412-469-6215. Story and photo by Liz Hand COLLEGIAN STAFF P erhaps you’ve heard about the bike share movement. It is already in place in Washington D.C. Cities across the nation, big and small, are getting involved with it. From Budapest, Hungary, to Pittsburgh, PA, there is a push for plans to come to fruition in 2015. This concept is already being tested in Pittsburgh and is being used as a form of transportation from Carnegie Mellon Universi- ty to Google located in Larimer, near East Liberty. This idea is very different from going downtown and rent- ing a bicycle at the Golden Tri- angle Bike Rental and enjoying a recreational bike ride in the city. This is because the times that you can rent a bike are limited, it is rather costly and you have to return the bike to the same loca- tion that you rented it from. The concept of bike share is more about having bicycles available in and throughout downtown Pittsburgh at about 50 different locations. You can use the bike in one lo- cation to get to another and drop it off at any of the bike share lo- cations. It is also available 24 hours a day at a reasonable cost. Bike Sharing is viewed as an al- ternate form of transportation. Why does this excite me? When I was growing up, I spent quite a few summers visiting my relatives just 30 minutes or less outside of the thriving city of Budapest, Hungary. My relatives had a refrigera- tor about the size students would use for their college dormitory rooms. Needless to say, we went to the market almost daily to buy fresh fruits and vegetables, meat, milk and fresh bread. My relatives did not have a car as they lived in an area where a bus or a train could be caught within walking distance. So, we would hop on our bikes and hit the dusty roads and sidewalks. We would bike a mile or two on a daily basis. It was an enjoyable form of trans- portation. For me, an avid bicyclist, this was fun, and it was a great way to greet the day. I loved waking up and getting the morning bike ride in and perusing through the market for our food supplies. While we were out and about I would see people of all ages on their bicycles. It was not uncommon to see an 85-year-old woman with her babushka around her head go- ing shopping. Women like her looked healthy, hardy and very happy. How does this translate to my view of Pittsburgh? First of all, I do not go to Pittsburgh much due to the exorbitant parking fees. Second, if I would go, I would want a bike to get from one part of town to the other, occasionally getting off to walk, shop or view some of that grand old architec- ture from both the inside and out- side of the buildings. I have found alternate ways to beat the high prices of parking. I often park in the Strip District for much less money or the Water- front in Homestead for free and bike to town. But, I am very attached to my bike and do not want to leave it out of my sight if I should want to walk around town. I do not want to pay the high prices for bike rental downtown, so I have to choose whether I would park downtown and walk to events or take my bike but miss out on walking around and into buildings. Soon, this will not be a problem for me. For the many people who work downtown and need to get to the other end of town for a meeting or may want to visit Point State Park during lunch or even beat the grind of daily traf- fic jams, they will be able to do this without getting into a car. These bikes will be available on a 24 hour basis, and you can access this privilege by using your I-phone or by visiting a ki- osk and using your credit or debit card. The price will be similar to hop- ping on a bus and paying a dollar or two or three. This will make it very affordable. Please visit the Pittsburgh Bike Share Website under the “Frequently Asked Questions” section for more information. http://www.pghbikeshare.org Right now there are discus- sions with PENDOT and some bureaucratic hurdles to jump, but I for one am very pleased about this alternate mode of transpor- tation for work or pleasure. I might just have to take a trip to visit my relatives in Hungary and see how their bike share program is doing, or, better yet, I could invite them to visit our wonderful city of Pittsburgh, which is becoming more like a European city than ever! I would like to hear your thoughts on whether you are for it or against it and why? By Kalina Gardiner CCAC BOYCE STUDENT O n Nov. 20, 2014, Dr. Murthy’s Biology 152 class from Boyce Campus enjoyed a field trip to the McGowan Institute for Re- generative Medicine in Pittsburgh. The institute, through UPMC and University of Pittsburgh, educated the students on different labs focusing on tissue engineering, cellular therapy, medical devices and artificial organs. The students experienced first-hand how engineers, medical doctors and researchers are collaborating to find better ways for the body to heal itself. Tissue Engineering In one area of interest, scientists take organs from an animal, such as a pig, and decellu-rize it, which takes all the “pig” cells out of the organ. They then repopulate the decellurized organ with cells from the recipient’s own body. Ultimately, this eliminates organ shortage and organ rejection that often occurs from the recipient. Researchers have also successfully decellurized tissue, forming a “cell matrix”, which can be used to heal lost fingers, rebuild muscle, and nearly eliminates scar tissue—thus making the tissue functional after rehabilitation. Cellular Therapy Another area of interest is adult stem cells that are found in adipose, or fat, tissue. Adi-pose tissue taken from liposuction proce- dures or patients’ excess belly fat are being used to repair face and skull injuries, reverse liver failure and assist burn victims. Severe burns were once treated by using skin grafts from other areas of the victim’s body. This has its drawbacks, mainly severe sensitivity in the area where grafted. At the McGowan Institute, researchers have developed a stem cell spray. The stem cells are sprayed onto the burn area, and skin grows back with a high success rate. Medical Devices Device-based research is also of interest to create medical devices with metal that dis-solves in the body.Although dissolvable metal, usu- ally magnesium, has be known since the late 19th century, McGowan’s researchers are perfecting techniques to meet time frames regarding how long the metal takes to dissolve in the body. This can reduce the amount of procedures, pain and expenses for the patient. The McGowan Institute in Pittsburgh is using cutting-edge science and engineering to develop therapies for those who suffer from trauma, disease or irregularities. Pittsburgh is re-nowned for advancing medicine and science discoveries, like Jonas Salk’s discovery of the polio vaccine. Pittsburgh is quickly becoming a top-rated health provider in the world. The Biology 152 students thank the McGowan Institute for their hospitable and informative tour. Regenerative medicine interests Boyce students Boyce Inclement Weather Hotline 412-237-4520
  3. 3. Page 3 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Perspectives Rare Trip Home to Morocco Story and wedding photo by Meriem Benikhis BOYCE STUDENT A fter I had moved to an- other country, I knew it would be too far for me to visit my parents regularly. However, living in that real- ity felt like a prison sentence. The physical separation was an emo- tional rollercoaster. With everything behind me, I left to start a new beginning with the hope of improving my children’s quality of life. I left behind a high po- sition, left behind my lavish apartment with nice, expensive furniture, left behind my luxury car, and left behind my cherished friends and loved ones. Most importantly, I left behind myself and my personal- ity. Despite my luxurious life- style and comfortable home, I left everything behind me because I needed to protect my children from my ex-husband who was physically abusing them. He also wanted to pre- vent them from going to school, which is another reason why I came to the U.S. in order for them to gain a better future. Even though I decided to live in the U.S. by my own choice, the sadness that I felt when I thought of home was heavy and burdensome. My eyes filled with hot tears that stung my face when I thought of the family that I left behind. Like a bird, I wanted to fly home any time that I thought of them. Yet, my wings were clipped, and I remained flightless for quite some time. Luckily for birds, their flights do not cost them anything. My flights required careful financial planning, like a squirrel packing away extra food for the winter. Additionally, I was as “busy as a beaver” while I worked three jobs, night and day. My only sol- ace was found in knowing the joy that would come from travelling home. I was very excited for that event, the coming day that I would return home. For special events, such as weddings, I returned home to Morocco. These celebrations were the only times that I would allow myself to buy an expensive plane ticket because I would see all of my family, including those mem- bers who had also left home as I had for some reason or another. During this time, I got news of my brother’s wedding and anxiously awaited, planned, and saved. Morocco is a county in north Africa. Morocco is very rich in traditions. A Moroccan wedding is really beautiful. I like to explain the traditions and customs for people who don’t know about them. The typical celebration includes several well-organized ceremonies that can last from three days to a week. There are different ways to celebrate this event which de- pends on the traditions or cus- toms of the particular town, but in general, more or less, the same elements can be found in different regions of the kingdom of Moroc- co. The future couple’s fam- ily will have prepared for this event one year before the day. The bride’s family focuses on clothes and money saved for celebration. The Bride The bride has to wear expensive, traditional Moroccan clothes, such as Caftan or Tak- chita. Takchita has two parts; it’s a dress as a first layer, and a second layer, or over dress, that often buttons up the front using the traditional “Sfifa.” Caftan is a sort of long robe. Both styles of dress are made of chiffon, satin, other rich fabrics, fine fabrics or brightly colored silks. The bride wears be- tween three to seven different outfits with different colors. Some dresses will be her favorite colors, and then others are may follow customs according to her state traditions. Yet, she is free to choose any style that she prefers. The number of dresses that the bride will wear is dependent on how affluent and wealthy of a back- ground that she has. However, if the family can afford to, the bride will wear seven outfits total. These seven outfits are different because everyone fol- lows the customs from their spe- cific towns. For example, most of the time, the bride wears either Caf- tan or Takchita styled dresses for all of the outfits. Sometimes, she might choose some of each. In general, the last dress has to be a white robe or a white Takchita; the col- or must be white. The Groom The groom’s clothes always must be a white Jelaba, Kandoura, which are traditional costumes for men. The Jelaba and Kandou- ra have buttons along the front using sfifa that match the exact same color as the material of the costume. The groom also wears two or three different costumes (suit-dress) with colors matching the bride’s dress colors. Now, it is not required for his outfits to be an exact match in color. He might wear white to match her green or navy with all of her dresses. In order to properly match, his clothing should not be contrasting in any way. Typically, he will wear white, gray, navy or some combination of these colors between the tops and the pants. His outfits are always less extravagant and showy in comparison to the bride because all of the focus should be given to his bride. He will never wear black because the color is con- sidered unsuitable for a wedding. In Morocco, the wedding colors must provide a sense of happi- ness and black is associated with unhappiness. The groom’s family’s side focuses on H’dia. H’dia are the gifts that the groom is re- quired to give to his bride. Some gifts may be sym- bolic, such as an engagement ring, sugar and dates (which rep- resent a sweet and happy life) or milk for purity. It also includes some clothes, shoes, and hand- bags. If the groom’s family is wealthy, these gifts also include jewelry and perfume. The H’dia ceremony is in the same evening as the “Henna” ceremony. It is before the big festival day. The “Henna” is a cer- emony in the presence of the women and girls in both families and friends. The bride dresses in a green caftan. “Henaya,” the woman tattoo artist, tattoos on her hands and feet some very attractive de- signs. Also, all the women and girls tattoo their hands with dif- ferent designs. The groom and his family and friends come to her parents’ house with the gifts as a symbol for love and happy life. The “Hammam” cere- mony comes one night before the “Henna” ceremony. Before any Moroccan wedding, Hammam is obligatory. Hammam is a sauna bath taken with great ceremony by the bride with the women who are close to her. Separately, the groom’s friends and family’s male mem- bers take him to the sauna bath in the dark night with the candles lit, singing and dancing in the street from his parents’ house to the sauna bath. Sauna ceremony bath is a modest ceremony with scents that are good, and the candles lighting the dark rooms, and one can hear traditional singing. “Berza” is the big and amazing ceremony that is an op- portunity to present the bride to the guests. They bring the bride to the large room or to the place de- signed with many colors, flow- ers, and light for this festival. The bride heads to a large chair, “Amariya.” Four strong men wear the same tradi- tional clothes with the same col- or, and carry the Amariya around the wedding place. After a few minutes of touring the large place accom- panied with music and dance so every guest gets to see and wish the couple good luck and happy life, the couple sit in two com- fortable chairs strategically in the center of the place and take some pictures with their family and guests. All through the night, the bride changes outfits with “Negaffates” help. Negaffates are the group of women who take care of the couple in this ceremony night, and help them with traditional Moroccan dress, makeup, jewelry, and hair styl- ing. Their presence this night is very important for both the family, because no wedding ceremony can occur without their presence. This Moroccan festival is also known to have the exotic Moroccan dishes. This almost all the time starts with bastella (pie stuffed with a fricassee chicken, almond, sugar and cinnamon), tagine (stew meat with prunes and al- monds), couscous, and many kinds of traditional pastries and Moroccan cookies all served with traditional mint tea. The guests dance from time to time to the rhythm of music. In this event the major- ity of time, two or three different groups or bands of music provide the entertainment. The ceremony usually ends the morning of the next day. Yet, bad things come sometimes in the nice moments. In this beautiful ceremony and amazing festival that I enjoyed with my sisters and friends and in the moment for dinner when I turned to see my parents, it was a shocking moment for me. I saw my father eating, or rather trying to feed himself. I was very busy those two days be- fore the wedding. I did not have a chance to sit with him at the table to eat and discover what I saw in that time. My father, who was once so strong and authoritative that everyone was afraid when he was home, had now changed. Before, no one would talk back to his orders. This same man was struggling to feed himself. He was so different to me in just three years. He could no longer eat on his own because it was hard for him to lift his hand to his mouth. Most of his food fell on the floor. I went closer to him to ask him if he needed any help. His answer was, “No, I am fine.” I felt sorry for him for the first time in my life. How I saw my father, how I felt that moment, was that this man was a stranger to me. I saw a man I didn’t even know, and I was sorry for him. This situation compares to the memoir by Henry Louis Gates JR with his father at his grandfather’s funeral day. For Gates, he saw a new side of his own father when they were at the funeral of his grandfa- ther. In the moments of his fa- ther’s few tears, all Gates wanted was to be comforted by his father. He says, “I was holding the hand of a man I didn’t even know. And for the first time in my life, I felt sorry for him.” Similarly, I didn’t know what to do. I thought I was able to make my father better or do something to relieve his suffer- ing. I felt guilty because I could not help him. I was the closest one to him in the family. He was more of a friend to me than a father. I knew that my father was ill; the emotional pain was often worse than the physical pain. I thought my father was feeling depressed and lonely. This could make his illness worse. In that moment, I was sure he was very angry, disappointed, and sad by his situation. These days were too short for me. I would have liked to stay with my parents for a long time to take care of my father. I felt that it was my fault, because I am away from our home. I know taking care of him or them is my responsibil- ity and that they need my help. I know in our religion, Allah (God) said we have to take care of our old parents, the same way they took care of us when we were young. We must give them just a little because they did a lot for us when we were children. It was hard for me, because my young children were in the U.S, and my parents are in my country. Everything that happens, happens for a reason. I couldn’t stay with my parents; I had to go back to my children. Life is hard and painful at times. I looked for a caregiver for them and asked her to tell me about all of the events that hap- pened to them day by day. Thanks to God, every- thing is now easier to know what happens in another country by computer or phone. When the time came to leave them, believe me, it was very hard for me, but I’m not sor- ry about my new life. Family Wedding Offers Happy Experiences, Sad Memories Too
  4. 4. Page 4 Wednesday, February 11, 2015CCAC News • South Campus: Speaker, Reverend Dr. J. LaVon Kincaid, Sr. 2/2: A friend of Dr. Martin Luther King, who participated in the marches in the South, will present a lecture on clergy during the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement. He will focus on the significance of nonviolent protest principles that were instilled by Dr. King: Room A306, 12:30 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. North Campus • Black History Month Display: 2/1-2/28: Atrium • Film - “Remember the Titans”: 2/18: Student Lounge, 11:30 a.m. • Speaker, Chaz Kellem, Manager of Diversity Initiatives for the Pittsburgh Pi- rates: 2/18: Room 3002, 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. • African Food Sample Tastings: 2/24L Atrium, 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. • Film - “Mandela Long Walk to Freedom”: 2/26: Student Lounge, 11a.m. "There are many lessons to be learned from the experiences of African Americans as well as our forefathers and mothers. Their tireless and collective efforts, determination, vision, intellect and persistence to lead change in the world have provided African Americans with a much better world in which to live today and in the future." – Dr. Quintin B. Bullock, CCAC President Listing of Black History Month Events and Activities FROM BLACK HISTORY MONTH EVENTS, PAGE 1 This job fair is open to current students and alumni of CCAC’s OTA/PTA program only. For more information, contact Job Placement and Career Services at 724.325.6771. Nursing Program Job Fair for CCAC Students & Alumni Date: Tuesday, March 24, 2015 Time: 1 p.m.–5 p.m. Location: Student Union, CCAC Boyce Campus This job fair is open to current students and alumni of the Nursing program only. For more information, contact Job Placement and Career Services at 724.325.6771. CCAC hosts spring job fairs throughout Allegheny County FROM CCAC HOSTS SPRING JOB FAIRS, PAGE 1 Transfer the credits from your associate’s degree and get the bachelor’s you need in today’s competitive job market from a world-class university. MOST POPULAR MAJORS: • ADMINISTRATION OF JUSTICE (BA) • HEALTH SERVICES (BA and BS) • MEDIA AND PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATIONS (BA) • NATURAL SCIENCES (BS) Includes premed U N I V E R S I T Y O F P I T T S B U R G H Learn more at cgs.pitt.edu/OpenHouse Kristine Trotta, CGS student, natural sciences major FINISH STRONG. YOU STARTED SMART. Join us for an Open House! Wednesday, March 18 4-7 p.m. First Floor, Wesley W. Posvar Hall 230 South Bouquet Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15260 Applications for May graduation are due March 2. August graduates who would like to participate in the May ceremony must also submit graduation applications by March 2. Please see an academic advisor for assistance.
  5. 5. Page 5 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Boyce's Fall 2014 Dean's List In the event of inclement weather, College officials will assess the weather conditions early to determine if the College will open for regular hours, delay opening the College (or campus), or close the College (or campus) for the day. Faculty, staff, and students will be notified through television, e-mail, twitter, Facebook, college webpage, emergency hotline 412.237.4520, and the emergency call tree. Inclement weather notifications for day classes and clinical will be announced and posted by 5:30 a.m. The decision to cancel evening classes will be made by 2 p.m. The Dean’s List, which recognizes academic achievement, is an- nounced at the end of each semester. As a full-time student, you make the Dean’s List if you have ac- cumulated 12 credits with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or higher and received no “F” grades and not more than one “W” grade during the semester. Courses below 100 are not included in calculations of the Dean’s List GPA. If you are a part-time student, you will be on the Dean’s List each time you have accumulated 12 credits with a cumulate GPA of 3.50 or higher and have received no “F” grades. Calculating Grade Point Average To calculate a student’s grade point average (GPA), CCAC assigns grade points to each of a student’s letter grades (“A”=4, “B”=3, “C”=2, “D”=1, “F”=0), and these are then multiplied by the credits assigned to the class. Grade points are then added up for all classes completed in a term and divided by the total term credit hours completed. This result is the term GPA. Students can calculate their cumula- tive GPA by adding up the grade points for all the courses attended and dividing this number by the sum of credit hours completed. These calculations are available on CCAC Central e-Services. Accettulla Kevin Ackley Christopher Acquaviva David Adams June Agate Ashley Ahmed Hashim Alderfer Amanda Alter Cory Ambs Susan Amoroso Jiane Andrejko Mary Anna Chelsea Arner Timothy Bac Daniel Bachner Paul Baehr Jacob Baldwin Choonghwa Balistreri Michael Barnes Patrick Batey Kristin Battle Cathy Berkowitz Benjamin Best Elizabeth Bihary Kristen Billanti Angela Blakeman Angelica Blaker Christina Bobik Tyler Bobnar Cameron Bokuniewicz Alysha Bolgert Mary Born Sara Bourgart Joseph Brendlinger Angela Broadrick Richard Brosk Jesse Brown Roderick Bucar Heather Bucci Rudolph Buckwalter Clayton Burger Tristan Burke Patrick Burks Emily Burnsworth Kelsey Busse Craig Buzzard Lorraine Cabili Malasia Caffas Jessica Callaghan Jay Campbell Danielle Cannon Beau Caparoso Charles Carson Alicia Castelli Melanie Cavalier Adam Chusko Angela Clark Matthew Clark Peter Clawson Linda Clisby Shawn Colalella Gabriel Cook Christina Cook Jennifer Cordova Shaina Cosgrove Kara Crisci Jenna Dalsass Casey Daniel Lori Darr Eric Dauer Race Decarolis Shea Demao Kelly Desimone Rachel Detzel Mallory Devan Daniel DeVito Elizabeth Dicriscio Adam Diperna Jennifer Dorosiev Rashko Dosse Lee Drexler Derek Duez Susan Duran Samantha Durante Rebecca Durick Sherry Earle Taylor Edwards Mary Eicher Samantha Elaschat Racheal English Phaedra Estock Brian Fabyanic Elizabeth Fair David Fechik Maureen Federline Michael Feerst Keelyn Fleck Kelli Frank Timothy Friedenberger Erin Gallaher William Gardner George Gardner Theodore Gavlik Jaimie Germek Amber Ghosh Malini Gich Paula Gilchrist Andre Ginder Jacy Gipperich Christina Gore Leslie Gorman Katharine Grachen Alison Grasee Rachel Hall James Hatam Maria Hawthorne Katrina Heil Rebecca Held Samuel Henchell Autumn Hensley Felicia Hensley Melissa Herron Melissa Hitt Jesse Humes Benjamin Iadicicco Jill Ingram Evan Jack Kaitlin James Jeffrey Jeffries Jessica Jendrzejewski Dennis Jenkins Amber Jessell Richard Kalp Ashlee Kearns Kaitlyn Kenny Ashley Kiesel Joseph Kisak-Propp Geneva Klass Laura Kliber Sherry Koglin Brandon Kopylcheck Alexis Kosey Raelene Kostyuk Yana Kozbelt Rachael Krull Amber Kuba Amanda Kubler Sarah Kuhn Samantha Kumar Albina Kuptsynova Elena Landon-Quinn Julianne Lantz Georgianne Lashnuk Sara Lassinger Rachel Laughlin Lea Lecuyer Andrew Legge Kimberly Legge Melissa Lersch Derek Letzelter Robin Lewis Jared Lewis Jason Lilac Alycia Lindemuth Nicole Lin Qing Li Shuo Little Alexandria Locke Donald Long Jonathan Lovas Angela Lowery Lisa Lukas Alan Lukas Joshua Lyons Ethan MacGregor Brandon Mackey Jordan Majiros Tracy Malysheva Alesya Marino Breanna Martin Renee Massey Robert Mastervich Mark Mayberry Ariele May Nathalie Mazhar Saif Mazur Danielle McAllister Diana McCann Marilyn McGraw Zachary Medina Ashley Meredith Jamie Miley David Miller Carmen Miller Cassidy Miller Cullen Miller David Miller Kasey Miller Meghan Miller Svetlana Milne Aaron Mirenzi Heather Miskalis Alexandra Mitchell Jeffrey Montalbano Philip Montgomery Krysta Morgan Jake Morris Elissa Mullen Michael Munion James Munion Jeffrey Nee Erin Neff Eric Nellis Trevor Niezelski Robert Nogal Christine Noullet Katya O'Daffer Robbert O'Donnell Joseph Obernesser Bethany Obiekezie Regina Obringer Shannon Offei Daniel Owens Erica Pais Cassandra Palombo Sara Pampena Vanessa Panella Taylin Parker Orissa Peters Kayla Peterson Victoria Peticca Rachel Pitts Gloria Plasencia Matthew Poeting Burke Pogoda Roger Pollock Andrew Powell Joshua Priest Meghan Pronio Angelina Psica Kristen Purcell Kelsey Purpura Daniel Pusateri Philip Puskar Alyssa Ranjan Shubham Ressler Richard Rettger Rachel Riazzi Gina Riccadonna Jordan Rings Bryce Roberta Domenic Robertson Hezreel Rocereto-Ridley Miraena Rodgers Brandon Rozier Danyell Ruggieri Gina Rusko Tiffany Rzeszotarski Carey Sacco Charles Salandro Zachary Santucci Marisa Sawhill Samantha Saxman Stephen Schmitt Kristin Schubert Michelle Schwanke Christopher Scullion Jacquelyn Seibel Ian Sembrat Cody Sentmier Vivian Sero James Shaffer Victoria Sheaffer Laura Sheldon Janet Sherman Marsha Siefers Lauren Sima Johanna Simko Bryttanni Simmen Kelsey Simmons-Howard Tameika Sinchak Stephanie Skanderson John Sluka Amber Smith Alexander Smith Amanda Smith Cory Smith Derrick Smith Tabitha Snead Sharon Sobotor Crystal Sokol Cheryl Soltis Macy Soubie Sara Spencer Chardai Stallworth Michelle Starr Jamie Steffel Charlene Stewart Zachary Stinebiser Collin Stone Alicia Stoner Jamie Stough Samantha Strano Dena Stresky Evan Stuckert Amberle Suriano Jessica Tagg Jonathan Thomas Charles Thomas Colleen Thomas Kristina Tillman Anissa Tkacik Megan Tomanova Lenka Trainer Adam Trask Beth Turberville Jessica Turner Cody Uhring Kelly Valentine Ruby Vasko Joshua Vesce Maria Walker Lauren Walker Randi Wallace Travis Wansor Andrea Wenskovitch Jeffrey White Chelsea Williams Dawnshalay Willison Avanelle Wilson Jonathan Wilson Kaylee Yost Lindsey Yuhas Brandi Zeno Caitlin If you'd like to write for the Boyce Collegian, it's easy to submit. Just e-mail Peggy Roche at proche@ccac.edu. This newspaper is the first place students, faculty and staff can turn to voice opinions about community college life or the world at large. The paper is published on CCAC's website, on CCAC's Student Life page on Facebook, on Twitter and on Pinterest Our next deadline is MARCH 9
  6. 6. Page 6 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Student Life Top Left: Boyce's basketball team takes on an opponent on home court. Top Right: Boyce's bowling team poses before practive: (L to R) Starr Edwards, Kevin Hindman and Angela Chusko. Bottom: Boyce's basketball team poses before practice: (L to R) James Sero, Greg Spynda, Mi- chael Tait, James Martin, Shy Faulkner, Derrick Smith, Musta- ufa Waalee and Cody Billingsley. Linda Neubauer, Phi Theta Kappa advisor, poses with over 100 gifts pur- chased by students and staff of Boyce Campus and Braddock Hills Center for the Children of the Auberle Foundation. PhotobyFrankKaufman PhotosbyFrankKaufman Boyce's Winter Teams Suit Up BRADDOCK HILLS CENTER: The month of March will be an educational, informative month at CCAC Braddock Hills Center for students. Braddock Hills Center Student Council will be holding three free information workshop sessions for students. Wednesday, March 11th from 11 a.m. - 12 p.m. a Women’s Wellbeing informa- tion workshop will be held. Sponsored by the Counseling Center at Slippery Rock University, speakers will be discussing topics regarding Women’s Wellbeing and Domestic Violence. Wednesday, March 18th 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., “Clean up Your Credit Score” infor- mation workshop Sponsored by Bank Braddock Hills Center Student Council Knowledge Is Power On Greater Pittsburgh, Dollar Bank, this session will cover ways to improve your credit score Wednesday, March 25th 11 a.m. – 12 p.m., workshop and presentation, “Under- standing Your Checking Account” spon- sored by Bank On Greater Pittsburgh, Dollar Bank. If you have ever had questions regard- ing your checking account, online bank- ing with your checking account, or how to open a checking account, this workshop will supply the information you need. Each workshop is open to all students at the Campus and Centers. Please call Braddock Hills Center for more informa- tion. 412-271-0201. phtoto courtesy of Barbara Poppa CCAC Braddock Hills Center collected blankets, gloves, hats and other small clothing items to donate to the YMCA of McKeesport Winter Transi- tional Shelter. The shelter houses 84 people in rooms. People who meet the criteria can be registered for a room. In addition to the 84 registered guests, anyone in need can get out of the cold in their cold weather area. The shelter will provide a safe warm place during the winter months for any adult in need. The evening before we took the donation, an additional 32 people were sheltered from the cold. The shelter staff was so incredibly grateful for the donations. As Velesha Singleton, volunteer shown here packing donations for the shelter, stated, “It was a wonderful experience.” Braddock Hills Center Helps those in need stay warm
  7. 7. Page 7 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Student Life CCAC Honors Program once again wins Pink Feet Race for the Cure HONORS PROGRAM: Thank you to the CCAC community for your generous sup- port of the Honors Program’s Pink Feet Race for the Cure. The three colleges’ Honors Programs raised a total of $2,456.50 for Komen for the Cure Foundation. With your help the CCAC Honors Pro- gram raised $1,862.85 to win the 2014 Pink Feet Race, outselling Point Park University Honors Program at $533.65 and Robert Morris University Honors Program at $60. On Nov. 19, Honors students and Hon- ors Directors from the three colleges pre- sented their checks to the Susan G. Ko- men for the Cure Foundation, and CCAC was once-again awarded the Pink Feet Trophy for 2014. Honors students Fred Astey, Angela Gay, Meghan O’Connor and Kelly Rock- enstein accepted the trophy on behalf of CCAC. The Pink Feet Race is the longest run- ning third-party fundraiser in Western Pennsylvania for the Komen Foundation, raising $25,097.09 since 2007. Of the money raised, 75% of it re- mains in the 34 county service area of central and western Pennsylvania, provid- ing free mammograms and educational workshops. The remaining 25% is used for national research. CCAC Leadership in Honors Schol- ars Emily Burks, Alyssa Carlson, Rachael Schneider and Alexis Schnepp served as team captains and generously gave of their time, ingenuity and competitive spirit in conducting the race, competing not only with Robert Morris and Point Park, but also between the Honors students at the other CCAC campuses. The competi- tion between campuses was won by North with $626, Allegheny at $562.85, South at $369, Boyce at $275, and the Office of College Services at $30. Special thanks to the Honors students who participated by working the cafete- ria tables and/or returning their sold pink feet: Alyssa Carlson, Chaya Pekkar, Won- dwossen Moges, Kathleen Kennedy, Kelly Rockenstein, Angela Gay, Kim Howie, Shantelle Bey, Charles Moore, Ekue Kossi Akakpd, Irene Anek, Jennifer Wong, Jack Decker, Kelsey Robinson, Kanvi Sharma, Adrienne Blice, Crystal Gonzales, Emily Burks, Zandra Herron, Danielle Thomp- son, Kalina Gardiner, Carmen Miller, Dori Washok, Daniel Asare Offei, Leah Blotzer, Tina Zajch, Sherry Durick, Lexi Schnepp, Sheila Snyder, Jeremy Hinnebusch, Grace Lizak, Brian Anderson-Warrick, Katie Voye, John Ivanchan, Jeremy Hinnebusch, Rachael Schneider, Julia Bavaro, Cathey Sirna, Megan O'Connor, Courtney Wal- lace, Jesse Bauer, Brandy Teprag, Jocelyn Dean, Fred Astey, and Lisa Allen. Thank you for your continued com- mitment to help in the fight against breast cancer! photo courtesy of Renee Shissler (L to R) Fred Astey, Angela Gay, Meghan O’Connor and Kelly Rockenstein proudly accept the Pink Feet trophy. Susan Harshbarger, RN MSN, tests student for carbon monoxide levels CCAC students check out the smoke free table loaded with information about smoking. Photos courtesy of Gyndolyn Bradford Braddock Hills Center’s Great American Smoke Out took place Thurs- day, Nov. 20, 2014. Staff and students stopped by to see the table set up by the American Cancer Society Tobacco Free division. Nurse Educator, Susan Harshbarger, did a fantastic job teaching and answering questions about smoking and quitting. She had loads of information to offer as well as a set of rotting teeth and pig lungs “yuck “on the table. It drove home the point that smoking causes major damage to the body. Quitting is very hard but the American Cancer Society offers help for anyone who wants to quit. Great American Smoke Out Impacts BHC Students CCAC North Campus Ice Hockey Team surpasses $20K mark for local charities PITTSBURGH—The Community College of Allegheny County North Campus Intercol- legiate Ice Hockey Team has raised more than $20,000 in funds and other donations for area charities since 2008. On December 6, 2014, the team took on the Pittsburgh Celebrity Hockey Team at the Mt. Lebanon Recreation Center in order to raise funds for Operation Troop Appre- ciation. An all-volunteer, nonprofit organization, OTA supports members of the nation’s military, both active and retired. All proceeds from the game—totaling in excess of $3,000—were given to the organization, including money raised from sales of custom-made game jerseys, tick- ets and auction items, which included an autographed Olli Maatta hockey jersey and a “Night on the Town” gift package courtesy of Hyatt Place, Hyde Park Prime Steakhouse and Pittsburgh Public Theater. Other prizes included gift cards and baskets from various local retailers and organizations. Feb. 17 August Wilson Center Van leaves at 11:01
  8. 8. Page 8 Wednesday, February 11, 2015Boyce News BIOLOGY DEPARTMENT: Dr. Leela- vati R. Murthy, Professor of Biology at CCAC’s Boyce campus, recently under- took a Scientific Expedition trip to Ant- arctica from Dec. 17 to Dec. 30, 2014, as a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). It was a once in a lifetime scien- tific expedition journey to the earth’s last and final frontier, aboard the expedition ship Corinthian, she said. The purpose of this scientific ex- pedition was to study life as it exists in Antarctica, the largest continent on Earth, also known as the white continent for its abundance of ice and snow. This voyage featured an accom- plished scientific expedition team, led by seasoned expedition leaders consisting of expert multi-disciplinary scientists, natu- ralists, ecologists, biologists, conserva- tionists and environmentalists in an effort to understand and discuss the unique fea- tures of this awe-inspiring land. Leading the AAAS team on this voyage was Dr. Robert Rowland of Cor- nell University who has studied the impact of Antarctica’s geology and glaciology on wild life and has been a lecturer on several Antarctica trips in the recent past. This trip was particularly relevant to Dr. Murthy since she teaches several biology courses at CCAC, Boyce, such as the study of life on this earth including wild life, the evolution of species in differ- ent continents, speciation and extinction of species due to loss of habitat, global warm- ing, melting glaciers, rising sea levels, climate change, animal behavior, biogeo- chemical cycles, environmental factors on human and wildlife health and the impact of human activities on the earth’s environ- ment. Wild life in Antarctica is unique and different from the rest of the earth. Albatrosses and Petrels are seen whirling across the expedition ship. Humpback and Minke Whales swim in the Antarctic waters. Shore land- ings include visits to 10,000-strong Pen- guin rookeries, old whaling stations, el- CCAC Biology professor explores Antarctica photos courtesy of Dr. Murthy Dr. Murthy (left) holds a block of ice retrieved from a nearby iceberg along with an AAAS teammate. ephant seal colonies and operational scien- tific research stations. The expedition ship included ex- perienced and knowledgeable experts on Antarctica’s bird, sea and land life, who educated the AAS team throughout their voyage via lectures, presentations and on- site nature observations. Dr. Murthy will bring this travel experience to her classrooms and will make a campus wide slide-show presentation at Boyce and other CCAC campuses on Tuesday, April 21, 2015 at 12:30 pm. Dr. Robert Rowland (left) with Dr. Murthy and other AAAS teammates take a side trip on her expedition of Antarctic icebergs. Dr. Murthy studies life on Earth's largest continent
  9. 9. Page 9 Wednesday, February 11, 2015CCAC News The Whole Student Approach for Success Tips to Mastering All of Your Classes By Liz Hand COLLEGIAN STAFF As the new semester begins, many students are filled with hope and optimism of acing their classes. Mastering new subjects and opening your mind to new information can be in- vigorating. How can we make that initial positive energy last for more than a day, a week, a month, or months? Will our enthusiasm and determination last for the entire 14-16 week period and help us to maximize our success? Perhaps you have read up on tips on how to master classes. That is a great starting point. This presentation is about remem- bering the whole person as you strive for a successful semester. Use the WHOLE approach for success We will consider different strategies us- ing the word WHOLE as a memory aid. W = Work efficiently. Work with your body when you are most alert. Have a good work area. Study by windows for natural lighting to boost your mood. Keep your work area uncluttered for mental clar- ity. Analyze your syllabus and pace out your work so that you do not fall behind. H = Have friends who are serious about their goals and homework. Help each oth- er to stay motivated. It is important not to isolate yourself. Friends can give you the emotional support that you need. Don’t forget that friends come in all ages. Hav- ing someone interested in your progress is very helpful. O = Own up to having fun. Obligate your- self to scheduling downtime. It is impor- tant to treat yourself to a little recreation every day. You may want to do a little lei- sure reading, play a computer game, watch some Netflix or meet a friend for coffee. Make sure you take advantage of inexpen- sive campus activities. The student life office provides discounted tickets for local recreational activities. L = Learn when to ask for help. There are many people on campus interested in your success. The Learning Commons has car- ing facilitators who are interested in your success and will help you to understand your assignments, tutor you in English and Writing. In fact, many students like to stop by when they need help with their essays. We can help you to get organized and offer a quiet, comfortable and relaxed study envi- ronment. You can also use the computers and printers. Have your student ID avail- able to sign in. There is no appointment necessary. You can also get help with Math at the Math Café through our door and to the back. Bring beverages and light snacks with you if you’d like. We almost always have coffee on hand and a one cup Keurig coffee dispenser thanks to the nice folks at Student Life. E = Essentials. Make sure to eat balanced meals, get enough sleep and exercise. It is important to keep your health and energy so you can perform at your best. Score More by visiting our SCORRI- DOR in the North Wing of floors 4 and 5 •Learning Commons and Math Café – Room N504 Walk in: No appointment necessary •Learning Center N406 – Tutors by ap- pointment: Call: 724-325-6666. •Library – N403. Onsite and on-line li- brary available. As for our hours: The Learning Commons and Math Café is open Monday through Thursday from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. On Friday and Saturday we are here from 9-2. We are closed on Sunday. The Library and the Learning Assis- tance Center open at 8 a.m. every day, but Saturday is 9 a.m. On Fridays both are open until 3 p.m. On Saturdays they are open until 2 p.m. They are both closed on Sundays. Call ahead during extreme weather conditions. Score this semester by visiting our three corridors, which I nicknamed “Scor- ridors.” We hope to see you soon. Job Placement & Career Services (Allegheny Campus) is hosting a: CRIMINAL JUSTICE CAREER SYMPOSIUM “Connecting Majors to Careers” Friday, February 27, 2015, 12– 1:30 PM - SSC Auditorium Come hear from professionals in the Criminal Justice field. All students are welcome. Judge Cheryl Allen Superior Court Judge Scott Schubert Assistant Chief of Police Ed Bogats Director of Security Dr. Ria David President Brian Arrington Trooper Tom Shaheen Associate Professor Rob Thornton Parole Agent Christine Williams Homicide Detective
  10. 10. Page 10 Wednesday, February 11, 2015 Local News Pittsburgh’s most famous neighborhood has new home History Center unveils largest public display of original items from ‘Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood’ television set PITTSBURGH, Jan. 22, 2015 – The Sena- tor John Heinz History Center unveiled a new long-term display honoring one of the most iconic children’s television programs of all time. Exhibited inside the History Cen- ter’s fourth floor Special Collections Gal- lery, visitors will see the largest collection of original items from the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” television set on public view. “These objects are important touchstones to the past and important re- minders of childhood and a kinder and gentler world,” said Andy Masich, presi- dent and CEO of the History Center. “Mister Rogers touched the lives of millions of children and their parents. These iconic sets and artifacts are sure to bring back memories.” Featuring select artifacts from the popular children’s show, the new dis- play marks the first time these items are on long-term view. Highlights from the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” installa- tion include: •The entryway and living room set that Mister Rogers walked through to begin each show; •King Friday XIII’s Castle; •Great Oak Tree, the residence of Henri- etta Pussycat and X The Owl; •Picture Picture, the display that helped Mister Rogers teach children using inter- active media; PHOTOS COURTESY OF HEINZ HISTORY CENTER Featuring select artifacts from “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” including the en- tryway and living room set that Mister Rogers walked through to begin each show, the new display marks the first time these items are on long-term view. The History Center unveiled a new long-term display honoring one of the most iconic children’s television programs of all time. Exhibited inside the History Cen- ter’s fourth floor Special Collections Gallery, visitors will see the largest collection of original items from the “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” television set on public view. •Mr. McFeely’s “Speedy Delivery” tricy- cle; and •A variety of additional items from the “Neighborhood of Make-Believe,” includ- ing King Friday XIII’s telephone, Hen- rietta Pussycat’s outfit, Chef Brockett’s hat, Harriett Elizabeth Cow’s desk, and the bench that Mister Rogers sat on during each show. Also on view is a life-like fig- ure of Mister Rogers, wearing his iconic sweater, necktie, khakis, and sneakers. Recognized as one of the most popular children’s shows in television his- tory, “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” orig- inated in 1963 as “Misterogers” on CBC Television in Canada and eventually made its U.S. network debut in 1968 on NET, which later became PBS. The show, geared primarily to 2- to-5-year-olds, was produced in Pittsburgh until the 2000/2001 season and taught gen- erations of children important life lessons along with the values of kindness and com- passion. The new “Mister Rogers’ Neigh- borhood” collection is included with reg- ular History Center admission: $15 for adults, $13 for seniors (age 62+), $6 for students and children (age 6-17), and free for children (age 5 and under) and History Center members. For more information, please visit the History Center’s new website at www. heinzhistorycenter.org. The new “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” display at the History Center features a variety of items from the “Neighborhood of Make-Believe,” including King Friday XIII’s Castle and telephone, Henrietta Pussycat’s outfit, Chef Brockett’s hat, Har- riett Elizabeth Cow’s desk, and much more. Join the Leadership Club •Being a member will strengthen your Résumé and Job application •Workshops are facilitated by U.S. Army Officers on leadership topics: Goal Setting, Personal Finance, Public Speaking, Study Skills/Strategies, and Time Management. •Meet with community leaders such as the Mayor of Monroeville and Monroeville Chief of Police •Join our Facebook page: Leadership Club at Boyce Campus sponsored by U.S. Army Key words: “Leadership Club Boyce” •Contact Student Life in S521, 724-325-6622 Pittsburgh, PA – Horror Realm, Pittsburgh’s modern horror convention, starts its seventh year at a new home and welcomes guests from the popular "American Horror Story: Freak Show" television series. This year’s “Spring Break Massacre” show will take place March 6 to 8 at the newly remodeled Crowne Plaza Pittsburgh West – Green Tree hotel, located at 401 Holiday Drive (15220) in Foster Plaza. The new location is just two miles from downtown Pittsburgh, just off the Green Tree Exit of Interstate 376/Parkway West and features ample free parking.
  11. 11. Page 11 Wednesday, February 11, 2015 CCAC News PITTSBURGH—Julia Fennell, professor of English at the Community College of Al- legheny County, has received the National Collegiate Honors Council Ron Brandolini Award for Excellence at a Two-Year Institu- tion for her work with CCAC’s Honors Pro- gram and at the national level. Fennell was presented with the award at the NCHC Conference in Denver, Colo., at the organization’s 50th Anniversary Kick-Off Celebration held Saturday, November 8. Fennell, who joined CCAC in 1988, is one of only two individuals to receive this inau- gural award, given to recognize a two-year college honors director or faculty member for outstanding contributions to the honors community. Upon learning of the award, Fennell was quick to credit others. “All the accomplish- ments made by Honors at CCAC are due to the tireless and inspired work of Honors Council, our incredibly talented and engaged honors students and faculty, and the gener- ous support of CCAC administration,” she said. Since 2005 Fennell has served as director of CCAC’s Honors Program. Her many accomplishments include developing Honors Program articulation agreements with five regional colleges; establishing honors credit tuition reimbursement for all stu- dents taking honors classes and participating in honors contracts; developing assessment rubrics for all program learning outcomes as well as developing an Honors handbook, newsletter and an annual Honors Forum; and increasing participation in CCAC’s Honors Program from 28 students in 2005 to more than 400 students in 2014. Fennell also has held many leadership positions, including serving as Northeast Regional Honors Council Vice President (2008), President Elect (2009) and President (2010), as well as serving as conference chair and as a member of various committees. She also has attended nearly two dozen NCHC national and regional conferences and faculty institutes, and has either presented or had her Honors students present at many of these conferences. In recognition of her work, Fennell has been the recipient of many awards in- cluding the John Dziak Engagement Scholarship Award (2014); the Vanguard Diversity Award (2012); the Phi Theta Kappa Outstanding Professor Award (2000); the Virginia Master Teacher Award (2000); and the NISOD Teaching Excellence Award for both 1996 and 2009. Outside of her work responsibilities, Fennell is also active with the Pittsburgh Opera where she has served as a member of the Volunteer Auditory Assistance Team since 2006. A resident of Pleasant Hills, Fennell holds a bachelor’s degree in Speech and Theatre from Westminster College and a master’s degree in Teaching English from the University of Pittsburgh. Professor awarded first-of-its- kind recognition for contributions to honors community CCAC South Campus hosts Black History Month lecture PITTSBURGH—In celebration of Black History Month, the Community College of Allegheny County South Campus Diversity and Inclusion Committee is sponsoring a lecture on clergy participation during the 1960’s Civil Rights Movement. Presented by Dr. J. LaVon Kincaid Sr., a retired United Methodist pastor, the lecture will take place Feb. 23 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. in the South Campus Tiger’s Lair, Room A309. Kincaid’s lecture will focus on the significance of nonviolent protest prin- ciples that were instilled by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and embraced by others as a means to defeat Jim Crow laws. At the time of the Civil Rights Movement, Kincaid was a student at Clark Atlanta University. He became friends with King and participated in marches in the South. Previously, Kincaid taught at the Pittsburgh Theological Seminary, and cur- rently serves as a Penn Hills councilman. He also oversees the new start-up church, New Life Ministries, operating out of the Penn Hills Library. This lecture is free and open to the public. For further information, please visit www.ccac.edu or call 412.469.6285. CCAC South Campus is located 1750 Clairton Road (Route 885) West Mifflin, Pa., 15122. CCAC part of state- wide initiative enabling individuals to earn college credit for prior experience PITTSBURGH—The Community College of Allegheny County, in addition to Pennsylvania’s 13 other community colleges, is participating in College Credit Fast Track, the first statewide prior learning assessment (PLA) initiative in the country. The initiative enables current and prospective students to earn college credit at one of the state’s community colleges based on prior work or life experi- ence—and establishes common standards for awarding these credits across the state. Credit can be awarded for previous employment, training programs, military service, independent study, community service and completing free online courses. PLA is the process used by many institutions to determine if an indi- vidual’s prior educational, workforce and life experiences can be translated to col- lege credits. According to the Pennsylvania Commission for Community Colleges, students who are granted PLA credits have better academic outcomes, better de- gree completion, better persistence and shorter time to completion than non-PLA students. College Credit FastTrack (ccfasttrack.org) is a new website and e-portfo- lio platform, which provides a single point of entry for adult learners in Pennsylva- nia to access prior learning credits at CCAC and the rest of the state’s community colleges.

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