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Maria Bartiromo on Being an Underdog and the State of the Media Industry

Read the full post on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/abundance-information-actually-starting-make-dumber-maria-bartiromo

"I was part of that opening up the information flow to people, right? I mean, when I first started my career, I was at CNN and-- I was a producer and a writer, and we were covering the first Gulf War. And CNN was doing something that nobody had ever done before, and that is cover a news event as it's happening.

So, there I am as a-- as a kid out of school, you know, learning the business, really as it's happening. So we had reporters like Bernard Shaw under the bed in Iraq, saying, you know, "Bombs are going off right now." Fast forward five years, when I got to CNBC in 1993, and I was one of the people that opened up the morning call.

I remember getting to work every day at the New York Stock Exchange and-- you know, people would say to me, "Oh, it's great that you were the first person to report from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange." That wasn't even the one thing that I was really proud of. What I was really proud of is I would get in, in the morning, and call all of my sources at different trading desks and ask them, "What are you telling clients to do today? What is your research call?"

And back then, as you know, 25 years ago, this research that the Goldman Sachs and the-- and the Morgan Stanleys of the world were telling their biggest clients to do, that research was expensive. You know, the individual investor could not have access to that. We broke open the morning call on the morning show when I was there, and basically leveled the playing field, giving investors this access to information that had not been there before.

So if I have to name one thing in terms of what I'm most proud of, that was it, opening up the morning call. And from there, it just got bigger and bigger and bigger. And now, as you say, we're swimming in information. I think for a traditional, you know-- news-person today, it's ours to lose.

As long as you are, you know, churning out accurate, timely, informative, interesting pieces and you're doing it well-- and you have that credibility, you will be able to thrive in this environment where you have many, many more distribution-- places to put that content. So, you know, I think that, yo-- as long as you have a-- strong brand, a LinkedIn, a Wall Street Journal-- hopefully I would like to think a Maria Bartiromo, Fox Business, Fox News Channel-- you know, if you have that credibility, then it's yours to lose. You have to continue keeping up, you know, the-- the top-shelf reporting that you're doing."

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Read the full post on LinkedIn here: https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/abundance-information-actually-starting-make-dumber-maria-bartiromo "I was part of that opening up the information flow to people, right? I mean, when I first started my career, I was at CNN and-- I was a producer and a writer, and we were covering the first Gulf War. And CNN was doing something that nobody had ever done before, and that is cover a news event as it's happening. So, there I am as a-- as a kid out of school, you know, learning the business, really as it's happening. So we had reporters like Bernard Shaw under the bed in Iraq, saying, you know, "Bombs are going off right now." Fast forward five years, when I got to CNBC in 1993, and I was one of the people that opened up the morning call. I remember getting to work every day at the New York Stock Exchange and-- you know, people would say to me, "Oh, it's great that you were the first person to report from the floor of the New York Stock Exchange." That wasn't even the one thing that I was really proud of. What I was really proud of is I would get in, in the morning, and call all of my sources at different trading desks and ask them, "What are you telling clients to do today? What is your research call?" And back then, as you know, 25 years ago, this research that the Goldman Sachs and the-- and the Morgan Stanleys of the world were telling their biggest clients to do, that research was expensive. You know, the individual investor could not have access to that. We broke open the morning call on the morning show when I was there, and basically leveled the playing field, giving investors this access to information that had not been there before. So if I have to name one thing in terms of what I'm most proud of, that was it, opening up the morning call. And from there, it just got bigger and bigger and bigger. And now, as you say, we're swimming in information. I think for a traditional, you know-- news-person today, it's ours to lose. As long as you are, you know, churning out accurate, timely, informative, interesting pieces and you're doing it well-- and you have that credibility, you will be able to thrive in this environment where you have many, many more distribution-- places to put that content. So, you know, I think that, yo-- as long as you have a-- strong brand, a LinkedIn, a Wall Street Journal-- hopefully I would like to think a Maria Bartiromo, Fox Business, Fox News Channel-- you know, if you have that credibility, then it's yours to lose. You have to continue keeping up, you know, the-- the top-shelf reporting that you're doing."

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