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On this SlideShare page, you will find several Power Point presentations, one for each of the most popular essays to read ...
 
Axe-in-Hand
The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away, but He is no longer the only one to do so. When some remote ancestor of ours in...
Whoever owns land has thus assumed, whether he knows it or not, the divine functions of creating and destroying plants.
Other ancestors, less remote, have since invented other tools, but each of these, upon closer scrutiny, proves to be eithe...
We classify ourselves into vocations, each of which either wields some particular tool,
or sells it, or repairs it, or sharpens it, or dispenses advice on how to do so; by such division of labors we avoid respo...
But there is one vocation-philosophy-which knows that all men, by what they think about and wish for, in effect, wield all...
November is, for many reasons, the month for the axe.  It is warm enough to grind an axe without freezing,
but cold enough to fell a tree in comfort.
The leaves are off the hardwoods, so that one can see just how the branches intertwine, and when growth occurred last summ...
I have read many definitions of what is a conservationist,
and written not a few myself, but I suspect that the best one is written not with a pen but with an axe.
It is a matter of what a man thinks about while chopping, or while deciding what to chop. A conservationist is one who is ...
Signatures of course differ, whether with axe or pen, and this is as it should be.
I find it disconcerting to analyze, ex post facto, the reasons behind my own axe-in-hand decisions.  I find, first of all,...
When a white pine and a red birch are crowding each other, I have an a priori bias; I always cut the birch to favor the pi...
Well, first of all, I planted the pine with my shovel, whereas the birch crawled in under the fence and planted itself.
My bias is thus to some extent paternal, but this cannot be the whole story, for if the pine were a natural seedling like ...
So I must dig deeper for the logic, if any, behind my bias.  The birch is an abundant tree in my township & becoming more ...
whereas pine is scarce & becoming scarcer; perhaps my bias is for the underdog.
But what would I do if my farm were further north, where pine is abundant & red birch is scarce? I confess I don't know. M...
The pine will live for a century, the birch for half that; do I fear that my signature will fade? My neighbors have plante...
The pine stays green all winter, the birch punches the clock in October; do I favor the tree that, like myself, braves the...
The pine will ultimately bring ten dollars a thousand, the birch two dollars; have I an eye on the bank? All of these poss...
So I try again, and here perhaps is something; under this pine will ultimately grow a trailing arbutus, an Indian pipe, a ...
whereas under the birch a bottle gentian is about the best to be hoped for.
In this pine a pileated woodpecker will ultimately chisel out a nest; in the birch a hairy will have to suffice.
In this pine the wind will sing for me in April, at which time the birch is only rattling naked twigs. These possible reas...
Does the pine stimulate my imagination and my hopes more deeply than the birch does? If so, is the difference in the trees...
The only conclusion I have ever reached is that I love all trees, but I am in love with pines.
As I said, November is the month for the axe, and, as in other love affairs, there is skill in the exercise of bias. If th...
it will shade the pine's leader in the spring, and thus discourage the pine weevil from laying her eggs there.
Birch competition is a minor affliction compared with this weevil, whose progeny kill the pine's leader and thus deform th...
It is interesting to meditate that this insect's preference for squatting in the sun determines not only her own continuit...
Again, if a drouthy summer follows my removal of the birch's shade, the hotter soil may offset the lesser competition for ...
Lastly, if the birch's limbs rub the pine's terminal buds during a wind, the pine will surely be deformed, and the birch m...
Such are the pros and cons the wielder of an axe must foresee, compare, and decide upon with the calm assurance that his b...
The wielder of an axe has as many biases as there are species of trees on his farm. In the course of the years he imputes ...
I am amazed to learn what diverse characters different men impute to one and the same tree.
Thus to me the aspen is in good repute because he glorifies October & he feeds my grouse in winter, but to some of my neig...
Again, the tamarack is to me a favorite second only to white pine, perhaps because he is nearly extinct in my township (un...
or because he sprinkles gold OJ! October grouse (gunpowder bias), or because he sours the soil & enables it to grow the lo...
On the other hand, foresters have excommunicated the tamarack because he grows too slowly to pay compound interest.
In order to clinch this dispute, they also mention that he succumbs periodically to epizootics of saw-fly,
but this is fifty years hence for my tamaracks, so I shall let my grandson worry about it.
Meanwhile my tamaracks are growing so lustily that my spirits soar with them, skyward.
To me an ancient cottonwood is the greatest of trees because in his youth he shaded the buffalo and wore a halo of pigeons...
But the farmer's wife (and hence the farmer) despises all cottonwoods because in June the female tree clogs the screens wi...
I find my biases more numerous than those of my neighbors because I have individual likings for many species that they lum...
Thus I like the wahoo, partly because deer, rabbits, & mice are so avid to eat his square twigs & green bark & partly beca...
I like the red dogwood because he feeds October robins,
and the prickly ash because my woodcock take their daily sunbath under the shelter of his thorns.
I like the hazel because his October purple feeds my eye, and because his November catkins feed my deer and grouse.
I like the bittersweet because my father did, and because the deer, on the 1st of July of each year, begin suddenly to eat...
I cannot dislike a plant that enables me, a mere professor, to blossom forth annually as a successful seer and prophet.
It is evident that our plant biases are in part traditional. If your grandfather liked hickory nuts, you will like the hic...
If, on the other hand, your grandfather burned a log carrying a poison ivy vine and recklessly stood in the smoke, you wil...
lt is also evident that our plant biases reflect not only vocations but avocations, with a delicate allocation of priority...
The farmer who would rather hunt grouse than milk cows will not dislike hawthorn, no matter if it does invade his pasture.
The coon-hunter will not dislike basswood, & I know of quail hunters who bear no grudge against ragweed, despite their ann...
Our biases are indeed a sensitive index to our affections, our tastes, our loyalties, our generosities, and our manner of ...
Be that as it may, I am content to waste mine, in November, with axe in hand.
<ul><li>Photo Credits </li></ul><ul><li>Historic photographs: Aldo Leopold Foundation archives </li></ul><ul><li>A Sand Co...
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Axe In-Hand

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This is the text of Leopold's essay "Axe-in-Hand" paired with beautiful images. This presentation can be used as a backdrop to public readings of the essay.

Publicada em: Tecnologia, Negócios
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Axe In-Hand

  1. 1. On this SlideShare page, you will find several Power Point presentations, one for each of the most popular essays to read aloud from A Sand County Almanac at Aldo Leopold Weekend events. Each presentation has the essay text right on the slides, paired with beautiful images that help add a visual element to public readings. Dave Winefske (Aldo Leopold Weekend event planner from Argyle, Wisconsin) gets credit for putting these together. Thanks Dave! A note on images within the presentations : we have only received permission to use these images within these presentations, as part of this event. You will see a photo credit slide as the last image in every presentation. Please be sure to show that slide to your audience at least once, and if you don't mind leaving it up to show at the end of each essay, that is best. Also please note that we do not have permission to use these images outside of Aldo Leopold Weekend reading event presentations. For example, the images that come from the Aldo Leopold Foundation archive are not “public domain,” yet we see unauthorized uses of them all the time on the internet. So, hopefully that’s enough said on this topic—if you have any questions, just let us know. [email_address] If you download these presentations to use in your event, feel free to delete this intro slide before showing to your audience.
  2. 3. Axe-in-Hand
  3. 4. The Lord giveth, and the Lord taketh away, but He is no longer the only one to do so. When some remote ancestor of ours invented the shovel, he became a giver: he could plant a tree. And when the axe was invented, he became a taker: he could chop it down .
  4. 5. Whoever owns land has thus assumed, whether he knows it or not, the divine functions of creating and destroying plants.
  5. 6. Other ancestors, less remote, have since invented other tools, but each of these, upon closer scrutiny, proves to be either an elaboration of, or an accessory to the original pair of basic implements.
  6. 7. We classify ourselves into vocations, each of which either wields some particular tool,
  7. 8. or sells it, or repairs it, or sharpens it, or dispenses advice on how to do so; by such division of labors we avoid responsibility for the misuse of any tool save our own.
  8. 9. But there is one vocation-philosophy-which knows that all men, by what they think about and wish for, in effect, wield all tools. It knows that men thus determine, by their manner of thinking and wishing, whether it is worthwhile to wield any.
  9. 10. November is, for many reasons, the month for the axe. It is warm enough to grind an axe without freezing,
  10. 11. but cold enough to fell a tree in comfort.
  11. 12. The leaves are off the hardwoods, so that one can see just how the branches intertwine, and when growth occurred last summer. Without this clear view of treetops, one cannot be sure which tree, if any, needs felling for the good of the land.
  12. 13. I have read many definitions of what is a conservationist,
  13. 14. and written not a few myself, but I suspect that the best one is written not with a pen but with an axe.
  14. 15. It is a matter of what a man thinks about while chopping, or while deciding what to chop. A conservationist is one who is humbly aware that with each stroke he is writing his signature on the face of his land.
  15. 16. Signatures of course differ, whether with axe or pen, and this is as it should be.
  16. 17. I find it disconcerting to analyze, ex post facto, the reasons behind my own axe-in-hand decisions. I find, first of all, that not all trees are created free and equal.
  17. 18. When a white pine and a red birch are crowding each other, I have an a priori bias; I always cut the birch to favor the pine. Why?
  18. 19. Well, first of all, I planted the pine with my shovel, whereas the birch crawled in under the fence and planted itself.
  19. 20. My bias is thus to some extent paternal, but this cannot be the whole story, for if the pine were a natural seedling like the birch, I would value it even more.
  20. 21. So I must dig deeper for the logic, if any, behind my bias. The birch is an abundant tree in my township & becoming more so,
  21. 22. whereas pine is scarce & becoming scarcer; perhaps my bias is for the underdog.
  22. 23. But what would I do if my farm were further north, where pine is abundant & red birch is scarce? I confess I don't know. My farm is here.
  23. 24. The pine will live for a century, the birch for half that; do I fear that my signature will fade? My neighbors have planted no pines but all have many birches; am I snobbish about having a woodlot of distinction?
  24. 25. The pine stays green all winter, the birch punches the clock in October; do I favor the tree that, like myself, braves the winter wind? The pine will shelter a grouse but the birch will feed him; do I consider bed more important than board?
  25. 26. The pine will ultimately bring ten dollars a thousand, the birch two dollars; have I an eye on the bank? All of these possible reasons for my bias seem to carry some weight, but none of them carries very much.
  26. 27. So I try again, and here perhaps is something; under this pine will ultimately grow a trailing arbutus, an Indian pipe, a pyrola, or a twin flower,
  27. 28. whereas under the birch a bottle gentian is about the best to be hoped for.
  28. 29. In this pine a pileated woodpecker will ultimately chisel out a nest; in the birch a hairy will have to suffice.
  29. 30. In this pine the wind will sing for me in April, at which time the birch is only rattling naked twigs. These possible reasons for my bias carry weight, but why?
  30. 31. Does the pine stimulate my imagination and my hopes more deeply than the birch does? If so, is the difference in the trees, or in me?
  31. 32. The only conclusion I have ever reached is that I love all trees, but I am in love with pines.
  32. 33. As I said, November is the month for the axe, and, as in other love affairs, there is skill in the exercise of bias. If the birch stands south of the pine, and is taller,
  33. 34. it will shade the pine's leader in the spring, and thus discourage the pine weevil from laying her eggs there.
  34. 35. Birch competition is a minor affliction compared with this weevil, whose progeny kill the pine's leader and thus deform the tree.
  35. 36. It is interesting to meditate that this insect's preference for squatting in the sun determines not only her own continuity as a species, but also the future figure of, my pine, & my own success as a wielder of axe & shovel.
  36. 37. Again, if a drouthy summer follows my removal of the birch's shade, the hotter soil may offset the lesser competition for water, & my pine be none the better for my bias.
  37. 38. Lastly, if the birch's limbs rub the pine's terminal buds during a wind, the pine will surely be deformed, and the birch must either be removed regardless of other considerations, or else it must be pruned of limbs each winter to a height greater than the pine's prospective summer growth.
  38. 39. Such are the pros and cons the wielder of an axe must foresee, compare, and decide upon with the calm assurance that his bias will, on the average, prove to be something more than good intentions.
  39. 40. The wielder of an axe has as many biases as there are species of trees on his farm. In the course of the years he imputes to each species, from his responses to their beauty or utility, and their responses to his labors for or against them, a series of attributes that constitute a character.
  40. 41. I am amazed to learn what diverse characters different men impute to one and the same tree.
  41. 42. Thus to me the aspen is in good repute because he glorifies October & he feeds my grouse in winter, but to some of my neighbors he is a mere weed, perhaps because he sprouted so vigorously in the stump lots their grandfathers were attempting to clear. (I cannot sneer at this, for I find myself disliking the elms whose resproutings threaten my pines.)
  42. 43. Again, the tamarack is to me a favorite second only to white pine, perhaps because he is nearly extinct in my township (underdog bias),
  43. 44. or because he sprinkles gold OJ! October grouse (gunpowder bias), or because he sours the soil & enables it to grow the loveliest of our orchids, the showy lady's-slipper.
  44. 45. On the other hand, foresters have excommunicated the tamarack because he grows too slowly to pay compound interest.
  45. 46. In order to clinch this dispute, they also mention that he succumbs periodically to epizootics of saw-fly,
  46. 47. but this is fifty years hence for my tamaracks, so I shall let my grandson worry about it.
  47. 48. Meanwhile my tamaracks are growing so lustily that my spirits soar with them, skyward.
  48. 49. To me an ancient cottonwood is the greatest of trees because in his youth he shaded the buffalo and wore a halo of pigeons, and I like a young cottonwood because he may some day become ancient.
  49. 50. But the farmer's wife (and hence the farmer) despises all cottonwoods because in June the female tree clogs the screens with cotton. The modern dogma is comfort at any cost.
  50. 51. I find my biases more numerous than those of my neighbors because I have individual likings for many species that they lump under one aspersive category: brush.
  51. 52. Thus I like the wahoo, partly because deer, rabbits, & mice are so avid to eat his square twigs & green bark & partly because his cerise berries glow so warmly against November snow.
  52. 53. I like the red dogwood because he feeds October robins,
  53. 54. and the prickly ash because my woodcock take their daily sunbath under the shelter of his thorns.
  54. 55. I like the hazel because his October purple feeds my eye, and because his November catkins feed my deer and grouse.
  55. 56. I like the bittersweet because my father did, and because the deer, on the 1st of July of each year, begin suddenly to eat the new leaves, and I have learned to predict this event to my guests.
  56. 57. I cannot dislike a plant that enables me, a mere professor, to blossom forth annually as a successful seer and prophet.
  57. 58. It is evident that our plant biases are in part traditional. If your grandfather liked hickory nuts, you will like the hickory tree because your father told you to.
  58. 59. If, on the other hand, your grandfather burned a log carrying a poison ivy vine and recklessly stood in the smoke, you will dislike the species, no matter with what crimson glories it warms your eyes each fall.
  59. 60. lt is also evident that our plant biases reflect not only vocations but avocations, with a delicate allocation of priority as between industry and indolence.
  60. 61. The farmer who would rather hunt grouse than milk cows will not dislike hawthorn, no matter if it does invade his pasture.
  61. 62. The coon-hunter will not dislike basswood, & I know of quail hunters who bear no grudge against ragweed, despite their annual bout with hayfever.
  62. 63. Our biases are indeed a sensitive index to our affections, our tastes, our loyalties, our generosities, and our manner of wasting weekends.
  63. 64. Be that as it may, I am content to waste mine, in November, with axe in hand.
  64. 65. <ul><li>Photo Credits </li></ul><ul><li>Historic photographs: Aldo Leopold Foundation archives </li></ul><ul><li>A Sand County Almanac photographs by Michael Sewell </li></ul><ul><li>David Wisnefske, Sugar River Valley Pheasants Forever, Wisconsin Environmental Education Board, Wisconsin Environmental Education Foundation, Argyle Land Ethic Academy (ALEA) </li></ul><ul><li>UW Stevens Point Freckmann Herbarium, R. Freckmann, V.Kline, E. Judziewicz, K. Kohout, D. Lee, K Sytma, R. Kowal, P. Drobot, D. Woodland, A. Meeks, R. Bierman </li></ul><ul><li>Curt Meine, (Aldo Leopold Biographer) </li></ul><ul><li>Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Education for Kids (EEK) </li></ul><ul><li>Hays Cummins, Miami of Ohio University </li></ul><ul><li>Leopold Education Project, Ed Pembleton </li></ul><ul><li>Bird Pictures by Bill Schmoker </li></ul><ul><li>Pheasants Forever, Roger Hill </li></ul><ul><li>Ruffed Grouse Society </li></ul><ul><li>US Fish and Wildlife Service and US Forest Service </li></ul><ul><li>Eric Engbretson </li></ul><ul><li>James Kurz </li></ul><ul><li>Owen Gromme Collection </li></ul><ul><li>John White & Douglas Cooper </li></ul><ul><li>National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) </li></ul><ul><li>Ohio State University Extension, Buckeye Yard and Garden Online </li></ul><ul><li>New Jersey University, John Muir Society, Artchive.com, and Labor Law Talk </li></ul>

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