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Special Report_Remodel for Digital Transition

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Special Report_Remodel for Digital Transition

  1. 1. p 1 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Research & Context on the Shift to Digital Curriculum SPECIAL REPORT Remodeling for Digital Curriculum In this Issue The Classroom Remodeling Mission Exploring Space: The Final Frontier Layout Options for the Remodel Spotlights on Successful Transformation Remodeling Nationwide
  2. 2. p 2 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report When the function of things change, it is inevitable that the form and structure around those functions change as well. A rapid digital transition is underway, and at the heart of that is a multiplicity of new software which itself is causing dramatic shifts in how teaching and learning are getting done. What’s inside sophisticated software systems today changes the function of teacher-student interactions. Teacher-as-source in front of the class is more and more an archaic model. Guided courseware creates greater individualization and self-directedness that allows new freedoms. Schools can create learning “expos,” or places of high engagement, teachers can give special attention to each student, and students can explore and personalize. Could it be that the revolution in education is the creation of “a theatre of experience?” Could it be the environment is as much a knowledge as the subjects and topics? Could it be the digital learning objects are the “furniture” being moved around in a digital universe as individualized chunked mixes of knowledge, and where the physical universe real furniture mirrors this dynamic mobility with teachers and students in various modes of learning? Could the school be a social knowledge itself as a stimulating arena that challenges students by being bright, beautiful, and able to mutate from warmly casual to rigorously professional in a flash? We think that teachers and administrators must understand the digital things, their increasing sophistication and character internal to software and devices, and from those, infer a remodel of their form and academic structure and the enveloping physical environment to most thoroughly come into the 21st Century. The Inevitable Remodel LeiLani Cauthen Well versed in digital content and curriculum change, the adoption process, successful strategies, and helping schools understand what’s available and what will work, LeiLani often writes on the changes and future of the education space. She is a media, research, marketing and sales professional with 26 years of experience in the high tech, government and education sectors. LeiLaniCauthen CEO & Publisher Editorial Contributors Publisher LeiLani Cauthen Editor-in-Chief Cebron Walker Editor Dr. David Kafitz Contributor Chris Kight Production Art & Design Dolly Johnson Ad Production Manager Denise Reyna Sales Operations Manager Kristina Hall Advertising Sales Manager Chris Sprague sprague@learningcounsel.com 888.611.7709 Ext 27 the Learning Counsel Copyright 2016. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. 3636 Auburn Boulevard • Sacramento, CA 95821 • thelearningcounsel. com The Learning Counsel helps our subscribing 170,000+ education professionals in the K12 and Higher Ed sector gain context on the shift to digital curriculum. Our mission is to help districts and schools reach real transformation through strategies for digital content & curriculum. Through consulting services and research, to events, custom publishing and online editorial, the Learning Counsel provides dynamic and diverse opportunities for private and public sector leaders to collaborate for positive change.
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  4. 4. p 4 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Table of Contents The Classroom Remodeling Mission 6 Exploring Space: The Final Frontier 14 Layout Options for the Remodel 22 Spotlights on Successful Transformation 24 Remodeling Nationwide 31 Thanks to our sponsors
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  6. 6. p 6 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report The Classroom Remodeling Mission The classroom structure of old was typically 30 desks or more facing forward for a predominantly whole group model. Theatre-style seating placed the teacher at the front-and-center of attention. With a new national focus on more individualized learning using software tactics, that model is soon to be seen only in old movies. No longer the exclusive“source-point” of content, teachers instead are using software that today delivers the content while giving teachers a new freedom and function. They can now customize and curate for each student like never before. Not being the only source-point, teachers are finding they need more than a theatre-style room and may need no room at all for some of the learning. Other aspects of what is happening in the software are pushing the development of yet other special/environmental shifts.
  7. 7. p 7 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Out with the Old Lectures and students taking notes or learning as the teacher used the whiteboard or even (ewwww) chalk, allowed one efficiency. The teacher gave one lesson to all the students. The efficiency scale was all weighted on the side of the teacher, and only the most excellent in teaching skill were both delivering the lesson and watching with hawk-like vigilance for those moments when any one student got lost. If they were truly careful, at that moment of glaze-over for one student, the teacher was stopping to collect that lost student back into the fold, or letting them drop behind. In either case, at that particular point an inefficiency was entered. The saving of one sacrificed the time and attention of all the others who might have grown bored with the remediation. The not-saving of the one sacrificed the one, maybe forever. Lecturing is often the default for teachers unaware of new content delivery mechanisms, or the great breadth of the internet. Lecturing dictated the forum form of classrooms in the first place. Textbooks had a certain structure and paced learning through chunks known as chapters. Each chapter typically had a formative assessment, a little test for understanding. Or there was an accompanying workbook for practice, depending on the subject being covered. Books could deliver ponderous amounts of information and plenty of nuance using the bridge of language. Another inefficiency was introduced by books – reading pace. Not every child in any one class reads at the exact same speed, so the same bifurcation would occur, some are bored, some are struggling to keep up. Discussion time generally fell back to lecturing time, so the structure of books tended to lend themselves to the existing form of the classroom and homework reading. As a side note, mastery reading with book collections and novels tended to draw out readers to exercise their imaginations. This is because black-and-white words on a page express only a train-of-thought sentence-by-sentence. It does less“show” by picture. That loss of imagination being sparked is a loss of a certain instructiveness, and could be one of the things now showing up missing in the TV and video-game generations. There are schools that have mentioned to the Learning Counsel that they have had kids showing up who have never ever seen a book. Videos and games convey a lot of the same things as books, but often do so at the expense of imagination, which is perhaps the one thing most needed today. These didn’t much change the classroom because they are just the addition of a large screen for whole-group viewing. They start to change the scene as the mobile- screen steps in, the laptop or tablet or smartphone. There is no doubt that people learn from video and games, but the holy grail of learning things that are not easily story-formed such as all mathematics, is something that fits between the book and the full video or long-form game world. That something has come into being and is rapidly populating the learning landscape. It’s “Screen Learning.” Not to be confused with online learning, which is defined very loosely as a course online that has guidance by a teacher and may have recorded lectures in it along with documents and instructions; or distance learning, which is even more loosely defined as learning across a distance from an instructor-led course. It’s also not“blended” or “personalized” or any of the other terms the industry has used to modify the existing classroom scene. Screen Learning is both in and outside the context of the classroom and teacher-learner paradigm. Screen Learning is also both simpler and more complex than other terms related to imbuing education with tech. It’s learning built for the computing screen, and that’s it. It doesn’t care where you are as a learner, or if a teacher is there, necessarily, although it doesn’t replace a teacher in every sense. It’s straight up built for the user. You know, like Microsoft’s Minecraft is built, marketed and sold to users. Kids learn elementary code concepts simply from using it. Screen Learning is a content delivery mechanism, which a teacher has had as only one of many functions in the past. It usually combines reading but also video embedding and can get as deep as a full virtual world with interactivity of most of its elements. It could be built to talk to you, and be personalized by the student and sometimes individualized by the teacher so that the student view to lessons is narrowed or“gated”. In that way, a particular student gets a precise set of lessons. It may require certain teacher inputs and teacher creativity within the framework of its master conception. Being built for the user is where Screen Learning is abruptly, but subtly, turning learning into the next big thing for consumerization. Because it also exactly matches the goals of customized learning so that every student gets exactly what they need, it’s also dovetailing into what institutions want to use but are not quite sure how to leverage in their current context.
  8. 8. p 8 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Screen Learning and the Consumerization of Education The most interesting thing about the burgeoning new world of Screen Learning is what it’s doing as a form and how fast it is propagating, which leads to a ripple effect in other aspects of education. Let’s take a look at this in context and what we know of the changing landscape of education as an industry: ■■ An estimated 7,000 digital curriculum and content companies or source systems already exist, and that’s before adding in all the one-off App builders that are sometimes one-man shops. ■■ There are tens of millions of learning“objects” or bits of learning — think in terms of“chapters” or“chunks” of knowledge like how to add and subtract fractions, or perhaps the Declaration of Independence. ■■ The objects are in a trend pattern of more discrete, individual and highly mobile bits. ■■ The objects may explain a single part of knowledge such as understanding pyramid structure. ■■ The objects are interactive in and of themselves. ■■ The objects can be multi-sensory, incorporating touch-screens and sound. ■■ Some objects are found in collections of like things, like videos and short games and e-books or e-chapters. ■■ Some objects are knowledge bits built into full courses, with a scope and sequence pre-built for those individual bits until a pinnacle or totality of knowledge in that topic is achieved. ■■ Some courseware objects are single lesson and others are full-coverage of a subject with multiple lessons that can be spread out in incremental amounts of time mirroring a daily classroom need. ■■ Some objects come tethered together with assessments and some are teaching as an assessment. ■■ Many times the objects in courseware have intersection points for teachers to interact and be able to set controls for the students. ■■ Sometimes the student self-controls the sequence and collection of objects in a randomized pattern such as book collection sites. ■■ Many times the courseware and collections offer analytics showing how a student is doing to the student and/or to the teacher. ■■ Sometimes the learning object is a game, offering all the typical game maneuvers like rewards and penalties and achievement levels. ■■ The learning objects are highly stylized with actions, animations, mechanisms, aesthetics, controls, individualizations, instructs and more, using developer and designer skills. Most teachers do not have to achieve ideal user interface/user experience (UI/UX.) © MooreCo, Inc. © MooreCo, Inc. The form of classrooms and whole schools is changing to be flexible to fit the teaching and learning as it happens, giving each student a better learning experience and hopefully many more “teachable moments.” Here are samples of possible classroom plans to create student collaboration and problem solving while the teacher can be free to move in and out of groups.
  9. 9. p 9 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report HOUSTON’S DATA-DRIVEN TEACHING & LEARNING ECOSYSTEM ■■ Many of the learning objects provide instructs in such a way that the learner knows they know the data at the end. This is perhaps one of the most significant redirects away from how teaching and learning has been in the past. When a learner knows they know, intermediation by another, as in a teacher or institution, becomes irrelevant for them. Testing becomes irrelevant for them. They already know and may or may not care to prove it to others, especially when demonstration of mastery is on- the-job or enhanced contribution. In fact, one of the constraints of consumerized learning in the present age is a perceived requirement for grades, diplomas and degrees that require institutional accreditation. This may be solved when trusted software says via built-in summative assessment that a grade or credit has been earned, and do so in a publicly consumable way on behalf of the learner that they can display at will. Since ultimately the fact of use of a grade, degree or diploma relies on the trust of the inspecting party, the college or employer, and many of these do not inspect them minutely, the rise of trusted third-party issuers could become a normal reality. Major brands like Cisco, Microsoft, Disney and many others already have certifications that have meaningful value to anyone. ■■ The learning objects are increasingly meta- tagged as aligned to a myriad number of Standards in the K-12, Higher Ed or professional learning certifications world. ■■ The objects may be accrued just like consumer- world shopping cart technology or iTunes libraries, and cut-up and rehashed into a new object for new“playlists” of knowledge or “knowmixes” of learning. The textbook, while still important in many places, was almost never used in its entirety and those unused chapters were considered wasteful. In the transition to digital, teachers wanted“chunked” content so they could mix and match at will. The industry responded with delivering exactly what was asked for, in large volume. Industry also took the opportunity to envelop that content into scope and sequenced courseware and sell it as“remedial” to schools and parents online. The easy entrance to schools was extra practice and help for students falling behind, so Screen Learning was a perfect fit. It did not require much teacher intervention and solved a problem. As education became ever-more complicated with new standards and accountability demands, increasing reliance on Screen Learning allowed schools to start thinking about it as core learning, not just supplemental. Now the high- engagement coupled with multi-sensory interactions of Screen Learning meets digitally native students exactly right, and increasingly has the heightened scores to prove it. The problem is the uptake by schools has been too slow for the commercial world. Upon invention of these costly learning objects, publishers have had to try to earn Places like Houston Independent School District in Houston, Texas have a Learning Management System that houses over one million digital learning objects. Other districts are similarly situated or well on their way. See http://thelearningcounsel.com/ paper/digital-curriculum-strategy- model-architecture-special-report
  10. 10. p 10 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report in any way that they could. Many of the largest have been nearly gutted as non-spending of billions of dollars caused cutting of staff and resources. Many times the talent cut simply went out and started new software companies, now using superior knowledge curation skill coupled with new programmers and software architects to build more start-ups for consumer products. In the meantime, schools almost universally went with their own teachers building home-grown learning objects, the vast majority of which are mere documents, links or recorded lectures. While these may be pedagogically useful, they aren’t necessarily meeting students with what they expect given all their other exposures to consumer-grade technologies. In fairness, with the content world in fractured small bits, publishers weren’t ready for a while and no educational institution was structured to curate and sequence every one of thousands of standards plus build all the tests. The ordered and careful world of education content fell to chaos and is still falling. While the consumer world keeps gaining ground, and companies like ABCmouse with its billion-dollar market valuation, Leapfrog, PBS, History Channel, Disney, Amazon and others are suiting up for the coming take-over, teachers and schools using no Screen Learning, or no tech at all, are not only behind, most have no idea there could ever be a quantum shift. And it’s already here. Read 180 is an HMH intervention solution to build comprehension, vocabulary and writing skills. ABCmouse is designed for children ages 2 through 6 years old. It has over 450 lessons and thousands of activities. The curriculum was designed with the help of early childhood education experts. myON provides anytime, anywhere access to a collection of more than 10,000 enhanced digital books. PBS Kids leverages the full spectrum of media and technology to build knowledge, critical thinking, imagination and curiosity ST Math is a web-based math visualization game developed by Mind Research. Curriculum Foundry provides you with tools to build and publish your own digital curriculum, and includes a vetted repository of content to get started. Considering how many schools are midst this transition away from print textbooks to digital curriculum, companies in this space are developing new systems and tools to support the move. Learning.Com developed what they called Curriculum Foundry. “It’s a system to find, organize, and share digital content. Curriculum Foundry’s digital curriculum building tools, vetted repository of standards-aligned OER, and array of learning platform integrations help school’s save teachers time, save money, and gain more control over their curriculum.” —Keith Oelrich CEO, Learning.com
  11. 11. p 11 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report LC Learning Remodeled: The Consumerization of Education Screen Learning causes a needed remodeling of the physical environment. Schools are doing this by either remodeling their existing square-box classrooms or going for a wholesale rip-out of walls and even roofs. We like to think this is all going in stages: Stage 1 –Arrival at an estimated 40% of classroom time as Screen Learning. The rest of the time probably needs to be spent on project-based- learning, good old whole-group, or labs. Teachers optimize their time while kids are in Screen to plan out the active collaborative time, while still eyeballing the kids to make sure no one is getting lost.“We’ve pulled multiple different tools and programs into our classrooms to deliver screen learning with oversight from instructors which accomplishes a high level of engagement and real-time, real-world learning,” said Dr. Michelle Zimmerman from Renton Prep in Seattle. “We’ve used software from Florida Virtual Schools, ALEKS from McGraw Hill, Red Comet and Coursera and this gives the kids experience with all types of technical subjects and even experience dealing with live professors while still in high school. These tools are preparing our students for college and careers in ways we couldn’t imagine even 5 years ago. As tools become more sophisticated, we’ll continue to be able to more seamlessly merge the physical world with the digital in ways that still emphasize humanity.” Sometimes, such as with Dr. Zimmerman’s group, Screen is more what has been called“blended,” a sort of use-the-tools while whole-group idea that is more consumer-oriented software tool use than it is content delivery. It may be content discovery as part of a whole group exercise. Arrival at such a robust coverage model is a long ways off for some schools. Stage 2 — Remodeling the existing classrooms and spaces. This may mean new furniture and beanbags and video-conferencing table space and more. It may mean robotics labs with robot war rooms. It may mean video editing bays. There may be traffic-control boards just like you might see in an airport, telling kids what room they are in, and cubicles for solo work and libraries with project space. Stage 3 — Rip and Replace or build new. This is where new concepts like“social-emotional spaces” and “quiet rooms” and“daylighting” come in. The future predicted by the Learning Counsel is a sort of“Expo” oriented learning center, a place that is shared but not totally compartmentalized, more like an exposition- of-learning that is high-engagement and high style. It is how schools will win students to attend when completely online education is an option nearly everywhere. Schools are already starting this, with floor- to-floor slides and fabulous cafeterias, commercial-grade professional software studios and maker-spaces. As a final note, to make all these changes possible, it takes the backbone of a network infrastructure that can manage this new vision for learning environments. AT&T’s Josh Goodell spoke to this point when he was introducing AT&T’s Network on Demand portfolio “[It] gives customers more control of their network, the ability to rapidly scale up or scale down their network, and improves TCO [Total Cost of Ownership], not just because you have the ability to use exactly what you want, but also because you can be more productive. You can spin up a location more rapidly than you could have in the past.” Through all of these stages, your mission: to explore the new world of learning spaces, to bravely go where school sustainability must inevitably go to synchronize with the rest of the economy in its experience orientation.
  12. 12. p 12 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report How It’s Not The Same as These Other Digital Models: Blended Learning is a broad definition pertaining to doing both in-person and online learning in a mix customized for a class by a teacher. Also called hybrid learning and mixed-mode. It assumes a teacher. Online Learning, a.k.a. eLearning may be a part of a course syllabus or the entire course, but it generally assumes a course context, not a single-object or discrete knowledge lesson as Screen Learning can do. It may be from an outside institution or entity as a requirement for part or all of a larger learning journey such as Udemy, Coursera or Khan Academy course while attending a K-12 school. Distance Learning assumes geographic distance be- tween the teacher and learner, and assumes a teacher-led model. Flipped Learning assumes a physical environment locus and is a teacher-led model. Individualized Learning assumes teacher inter- position within the learning inclusive of levels allowed into within the software. This is a trait of some Screen Learning. Personalized Learning assumes self-direction, which is a trait of Screen Learning but teachers can also interpose as guides by individualizing the software view. Definitions: Screen Learning: Learning built for the computing screen to deliver content for a user with fancy digital aspects. It doesn’t necessarily use or fully replace a teacher, but could be used in a classroom or outside of it as an individual learning object or full courseware for mastery of the content. Screen Learning assumes an “objectized” or“chunked” view of subjects and topics much like a single video, short-form game (“gamelet”) or App might be on the history of the Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln versus a whole course on the Civil War or America’s Founding Fathers. Screen Learning Time: Refers to the classroom time dedicated to the use of Screen Learning of digital curriculum, content or courseware on devices.
  13. 13. p 13 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Common learning spaces at Buckingham County Primary and Elementary Schools, Dillwyn, Virginia Exploring Space: The Final Frontier If happiness, in large measure, is determined by personal confidence in one’s ability to reach their potential, then we must ask ourselves,“are we as educators doing everything to instill confidence?” Let’s use that as the launch point to discuss the redesign of today’s schools and the evolution of education. The spaces and places in which children and young people learn have a profound effect on how they feel about themselves, and therefore how confident they are. The space affects how well they learn but also who they are and who they will be. A clean, upbeat environment also helps teachers teach. So why aren’t schools designed like Disneyland or the newest shops in the best neighborhoods, which have had enormous research into capturing attention, creating interaction and accomplishing a great and, hopefully, meaningful human experience? Belief and budget: this Special Report takes aim at helping all leaders believe, and budget should follow.
  14. 14. p 14 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report INew Frontier If you happen to find yourself in conversation about the shift in education, how to increase student engagement, how to“transform” your class, know this: your peers across virtually every state of the nation are having the same talk. Steve Wentz, the CTO of Pasadena ISD (TX) told the Learning Counsel:“We’re on the cusp of seeing some huge differences in the education market. It’s a hundred-year-old process that needs to be changed. Turning this ship is difficult. Everybody is comfortable with the old stuff. But don’t make changes and we’ll become irrelevant.” There can be no question we have a long way to go to have all classrooms redesigned into flexible learning spaces. It will take time, a change in the way we budget and a lot of sweat from instructors and administrators to accomplish this shift. As educators, we identify critical thinking, creativity and the ability to collaborate with others to solve problems as some of the essential skills that learners need, but rarely do teachers make notations of how the physical environment should be laid out per each lesson plan to support the learning objectives. Meet Moje Architect, Robert W. Moje, Founding Partner at VMDO Architects in Virginia, has been involved in the redesign of public and private schools for forty years. That career has given him a deep understanding of how spaces foster creativity, productivity and communication and how students obtain and retain knowledge. “Space—it’s a critical component to helping shape and form the learning experience and a key component in my current main line of investigation,” states Robert. “Spaces and places have an important aspect in shaping mood and attitude. Research is catching up now with the science which proves what anyone could always observe—that their mood and attitude is one of the most significant factors in a person’s ability to learn and retain knowledge and develop their intellect.” One of the important ways design impacts teaching is by aiding instructors through the mechanics of the room itself so they can adapt lessons around objectives. Any educator would agree that if students recognize direct connections between schoolwork and their physical environment, their personal lives and the world around them, academic engagement rises. Principal Erin Russo of Discovery Elementary, a VMDO designed public school in the Arlington (VA) Public School District, spoke directly to this factor:“With this space we can really get creative and experiment and generate really meaningful experiences for the students. We as instructors now focus on how students learn and how we can enhance those meaningful experiences with the spaces themselves.” Industrial Flaw Science is now telling us what teachers have always known: that individuals learn at different speeds and different levels and want to know all types of different things. The firehose approach to whole classroom teaching was tragically flawed within the Industrial Age models of school construction. “That current classroom model, as science in education is proving, is pretty flawed,” said Moje.“What we’ve found is that a school ought to look a heck of a lot more like a Starbucks. It ought to look a lot more like a Discovery Museum. It ought to look more like a scene shop for a Broadway production or a movie set. It ought to have all sorts of tools and resources available when the students want them and need them and have all kinds of different spaces. Open spaces, discrete spaces so that they are appropriate for the activities that happen in the course of the day.” Technology now gives us, logistically, the opportunity to deliver individually-paced learning to any student for what they’re curious about and what they want to learn. We’ve just scratched the surface of what’s possible, but now there is no argument that that possibility is there for truly individualized learning. In that regard, Kurt Madden of Fresno Unified, who has 73,000 students under his charge, talked to the Learning Counsel about his team’s recognition 9 years ago that technology was going to change the way we teach.“We’ve been teaching with paper and pencil for a couple hundred years. Now we are in this big shift. It’s We must ask ourselves how design impacts teaching by virtue of the mechanics of the space itself. ■■ Can the walls move and shift to facilitate a lesson, video or group activity? ■■ Does the furniture adjust for reading or slide for a demonstration? ■■ Can the students freely draw or write on walls or tables? ■■ Does the space lend itself to instructors developing assignments that include real-world situations and have projects that are collaborative by nature and hopefully even culturally relevant?
  15. 15. p 15 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report At Arlington Discovery Elementary School in Virginia careful attention was given to every nook and space for a seamless integration between design and learning. Sound baffles in the ceiling, lighting and furniture is arranged in balance between sustainability and how kids want to be while they gain and retain knowledge. “With this space we can really get creative and experiment and generate really meaningful experiences for the students. We, as instructors, now focus on how students learn and how we can enhance those meaningful experiences with the spaces themselves.” —Erin Russo Principal Discovery Elementary going to be easy. But you need to work through the integration. The role of teachers in this is going to change. Kids are going to be learning on their own paths with these tools. Consider how you, as an adult like to learn something: you try it, you fail, you look to someone with experience as a guide so you can find your path, and keep working at it. Teachers will need to be more like personal trainers, like coaches.” Tactics When getting into a conversation about redesigning a school, budgets are the pain point of any Superintendent or Assistant Superintendent. Often the question is, does it require new funding sources or a change in budget priorities? The answer is always that what is most required is a change in mindset. Taking one of Virginia’s worst performing school systems and flipping it to become one of the top was a gold star in Robert Moje’s career.“Many years back when the state of Virginia passed SOL (Standards of Learning) requirements, the State Department went in and looked at this particular school – Manassas Park City Schools – and told them there is no way this demographic, this group is ever going to make it, you should just go out of business (as a City) and they should just dissolve the whole thing and become part of the county. They said,‘We can mix you up with some more wealthy areas and that’s your only path’.” © VMDO Architects © VMDO Architects
  16. 16. p 16 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report As Moje tells it, the school district was determined and wouldn’t agree, and bravely went on anyway with dramatic remodel plans. The district worked with engineers and architects and planners for five years to complete the first school. Over a period of sixteen years the district doubled their square-footage and remodeled every square foot. “With a lot of planning, and lot of budgeting and cutting and reallocating, they built their district to be twice as big as it used to be,” stated Moje.“Nobody wanted to live there and, after some success, it became one of the more popular places to live because their school system was so good.” Manassas City Schools went from a school population where only 27% of the students went on to anything— college, career, military—to 85% of graduates going on to college or career. It is possible to make those kinds of changes and in Moje’s view,“It’s mostly by changing culture and an understanding of what’s possible.” Discovery Elementary, Arlington, Virginia: Building a Place of Joy Learning should be joyful. The Discovery Elementary “net-zero” public school in Arlington, Virginia, was envisioned to be a hundred percent sustainable campus that was a place of joy for kids to learn. It opened in September of 2015, after breaking ground in March of 2013. It is 98,000 square feet and designed to serve 630 pre-K through 5th grade students. Moje, who was the project leader, said that the spaces are proof that kids can learn in an environment that is inviting and encourages joy in engagement.“If we can get the children to be happy and joyful, just to be there while they are learning, then 95% of the effort of getting them engaged will be taken care of.” Part of the feedback that exemplified how the school spaces are achieving their goal has been that“The Principal had the administrator over attendance come up to her one day and she told her,‘Look, Johnnie got picked up by his mother to go to the Orthodontist at 2:00. He came back at 2:45. School ends at 3:15.’ He insisted to his mother that he had to get back to school because he wanted to be there at the end of the day and for whatever little activity was left because that’s a place of joy for him, excitement for him,” said Moje. Moje recommends that schools consider how they would create a place of joy from a child’s point of view, and that is how VMDO has seen the most success. “Everything about the building and grounds were themed,” said Moje.“The pre-school is the back yard, the middle school starts with fields and forests, then you have the ocean and eventually the atmosphere, the galaxy and the universe beyond. Interestingly, during our initial research, John Glenn, from Ohio – one of the U.S. Astronauts – had lived right across the street from this site and had trained for Friendship 7, the first man in space, by running around the site. So that’s © VMDO Architects © VMDO Architects Learning spaces at Buckingham County Schools
  17. 17. p 17 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report where the name Discovery comes from. His last flight was on the Space Shuttle ‘Discovery’, so‘Discovering the Joy of Learning’ is the long name of that school.” Buckingham County Primary and Elementary Schools: Revived from Total Lost Cause Buckingham County Primary and Elementary Schools is another example of a campus which was redesigned from the ground up to change the paradigm of how teaching and learning happens. Buckingham County was in fact considered a lost cause. Their leadership was told they were going to be consolidated into another larger district. They would lose all identity. They had five elementary schools and they were all old and worn out. Doing anything but closing some of their schools and bringing others into another system seemed the only solution as every other option was too expensive. A new Superintendent came in and decided he was going to do something different. He started with what had been an old African American K-8 school/ High School side-by-side that they had abandoned, mostly because of perception and their history. He pulled his engineers and architects in and asked them what they could do. The buildings were not great but they were empty and work could start, so that kept certain costs low. The design team created a total learning environment in order to support learning both inside and outside the traditional classroom. It was a ground-up change. It didn’t have to be expensive, but it had to change so that the families around could believe the school has new potential. Now at Buckingham, each grade level enjoys age-appropriate outdoor gardens and play terraces, which encourage children to re-connect and spend time in their natural surroundings. Inside the schools, in addition to core classrooms, each grade level has small group learning spaces that transform circulation pathways into child-centric“learning streets.” These spaces are intimately scaled with soft seating and fun colors that communicate both collaborative and shared learning experiences. “When Buckingham was reopened in September of 2012, the community poured in and parents and students were there and you heard kids looking up at their parents and saying,‘Can we stay here, can I live here, can I sleep here every night?’” said Moje. Further Exploration Tens of thousands of schools out across the world still have their existing buildings and infrastructure from thirty years ago, some even from a hundred years ago. It will be difficult but some schools are making it happen“in place.” Take for example, Alexandria Country Day School (ACDS) in Virginia. Constructed in 1943 and originally a Catholic girls school, ACDS’s schoolhouse has been improved and modernized in a way that retains the spirit and warmth of the old, yet has inserted into it a very modern, flexible and responsive approach to teaching and learning. Central to the classroom re-design are mobile adjustable standing desks from Ergotron, called “LearnFit” desks, which allow for both student personalization and teacher flexibility. ACDS consulted with Dr. Ellen Fisher of the New York School of Interior Design, to transform the classrooms while maintaining the original classic look of the buildings. She stated,“Our goal was to © VMDO Architects © VMDO Architects
  18. 18. — p 18 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report achieve less-specific and more multi-use learning spaces that are purposeful today and flexible for the ever-evolving pedagogy of tomorrow.” Bob Hill, Ergotron’s Education Manager, concurs,“The physical classroom itself plays a significant role in realizing the promise of 1:1 devices and personalized learning tools, and classroom furniture must keep pace with technology and students’ varied learning styles. Student desks need to promote better metabolic learnstyles, greater student engagement and natural collaboration.” A growing body of research shows that there are metabolic health benefits to introducing standing into the classroom, which are exhibited in the form of greater student engagement and on-task behavior, which has a positive impact on academic performance. Some tips for any “remodeler”: Good acoustics, mobile, indestructible and bright furnishings, casual and center- stage type interaction and isolation spaces. There should be different sized places for different groups to interact. There should be places for storage and material, for continuing art projects or robotics or maker-space activities. There should be rooms allocated so that materials can be left out for long periods of time. There should be nooks and corners to read. There should be lots of light. There should be spaces to experience nature. “Just think if we flipped those statistics of 60-70% of kids who are absolutely bored out of their minds,” said Moje. “What if we had those kids absolutely engaged and creatively using everything we have available for them because we accomplished this transformation of education?” “What if we had those kids absolutely engaged and creatively using everything we have available for them because we accomplished this transformation of education?” —Robert W. Moje Founding Partner, VMDO Architects Alexandria Country Day School (ACDS) brought in Dr. Ellen Fisher of the New York School of Interior Design to assist in modernizing their classrooms while maintaining the classic architecture of the original buildings. LC © VMDO Architects © VMDO Architects
  19. 19. p 19 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Experience the first scalable on-demand Ethernet. You’ll have constant access to a user-friendly online portal that enables you to manage network usage in near real-time. Add locations, change services, or scale bandwidth up or down, so you can provision usage. To learn more visit att.com/highered Introducing AT&T Switched Ethernet on Demand A reliable connection with real-time agility. Imaginationondemand. AT&T’snewexpandedEthernetportfoliois helpingeducationalorganizationsoptimizetheir resourceswithtailoredinnovativesolutions. Software-Defined Networking Higher bandwidth, higher speeds ©2016 AT&T Intellectual Property. All rights reserved. AT&T and Globe logo are registered trademarks of AT&T Intellectual Property.
  20. 20. p 20 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Layout Options for the Remodel Independent study – cubicles Similar to a single desk configuration for independent study and useful for middle and high schools when full individualized learning is in use. Similar to typical businesses of today, these can be high or low-walled or simple carrels taking up limited space. Career readiness and high school intervention are typical applications. Meeting room Boardroom looking meeting spaces for small or large groups, typically equipped with projection and whiteboards that are interactive or not. Divided setting, pairs A section of one room that has pair-up desks or tables, ideally mobile with wheels, that can be configured into working pair-ups. Divided setting, teams Same as Pairs except larger separate configuration of desks or tables. Divided setting, project based A section of one room that has a project orientation with larger table space and may be ideally suited for art/maker/robotics projects with specialized impact resistant surfaces. Divided setting, advisory A particular type of one-on-one setting using teacher desk and student chair, desk or table; student-and- student desk or table in a sectioned off area; half-moon table for multiple students working in a group while teacher leads or oversees that dialog or work. Flat screen monitors commonly included in configuration for group viewing. Divided setting, multi-use soft seating spaces Set up for working-while-lounging such as beanbag chairs and plush carpets to lay around on while reading from books or tablets, couches or poufs and some side tables for having an informal chat about a project. Common for elementary grades for “reading” periods. These definitions by the Learning Counsel describe some of the settings as they vary from schools-of-old. Many are adaptable within existing schools and some can be part of actual structural remodels to provide new spaces designed in new ways. Single-setting whole group A space with desks or seats all face-forward with teacher as the central delivery point via lecture with some illustrative content points in analog or digital chunks. Usually podium or teacher desk and blackboard/regular or interactive whiteboard/ projection and television for video clips. Setting does not lend itself to rearrangement, desks may even be bolted down. Single-setting whole group interactive with multiple delivery modes Same as the above except technology is taking center stage as the delivery mechanism, teacher is directing attention mostly to outside sources (video, projection, courseware,Apps) not predominately lecture. Students may also be called on to use technology such as calculating on-the-fly or look-ups. Technology may include all or some of the students on computing devices with dynamic interaction during whole group lessons. If computing,Teacher’s device may lock-screen on all other devices and force attention to one source, and that one source may be on Teacher tablet and/ or projected to large screen. This is typically what is known as“blended learning.” Typically one arrangement of desks or chairs in any configuration, face-forward rows, rounds, horse-shoe, or giant circle. Single-setting stadium Same as Single-Setting Whole Group or Interactive above except totally stationary and set up with riser rows. Typically extra-large and requires super-sized screens and voice amplification for any lecture or digital source. Common configuration in universities. Atypical for K-12. Independent study desks The single desk configuration is for independent study when students need to focus on their own projects, especially for taking tests. © MooreCo, Inc.
  21. 21. p 21 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Divided setting or separate room, lab Maker spaces with access to technology.Typically high tables with power and tops with specialized high impact surfaces and mess resiliency for science or art work. May be in-room with other settings or a stand-alone dedicated room for lab work. May be a robotics or virtual lab for tools from such companies as RobotLAB, Lego and the acclaimed Dash and Dot from Wonder Workshop. Divided setting or separate room, studio For video or sound editing, having specialized audio/ visual equipment and potentially a theatrical space preset for video backgrounds/green screen. Divided setting or separate room, arts For music creation or arts work, having specialized equipment and table or desk settings and potentially an orchestral seating with risers. Divided setting, intensive computing This type of space used to be known as a computing lab, but now is a separate space typically with computers with high speed graphics cards for rapid rendering capability for graphics art, video and more. Divided setting, manipulatives An area in a classroom set up for individuals to play with or use objects such as blocks and toys, mini-whiteboards, interactive whiteboards, robotics; a dedicated editing computer, a dedicated distance-learning computer with headset such as those used for speech therapy lessons online (such as for programs like PresenceLearning); a set of manipulative objects that interact with the computers including shapes and science equipment that may be used also in Labs such as Tiggly, OSMO and other more sophisticated lab equipment that can connect to computers for analysis. Divided setting, quiet space A separate space that may be in-class and semi-walled-off or an entire separate room for students to escape to or be assigned to. May contain work desk or lounge setting and be a subdued lighting space that is extra quiet. Divided setting, communications space A separate space that may be in-class as a video- conferencing table for external communications, or a phone-booth like space for students and teachers to visit to make external calls in private that could contain a power outlet and desk and chair. Divided setting, small or large group social emotional circle Smaller more subdued spaces containing a circle of chairs for group discussions. In addition to the above list for the redesign of existing schools and classroom spaces, there are many other spaces within school grounds to be included in the complete redesign of teaching and learning environments. Spaces to consider in this regard would include: Niches within corridors and circulation spaces These make for ideal spaces for students to engage with technology and each other, where they can see and be seen in conjunction with other educational activities. Commons, or areas within common spaces, including views to outside and nature This could include window seats, lobbies, any area that would allow students to simultaneously work and enjoy the benefits that viewing nature has on the student. Lofts or balcony overlook spaces Allowing students to work in different size groups while still being specially and visually connected to their teachers and classmates. Outside play space Play is essential and the outside spaces of education institutions are widely recognized to be vital in the transformation of teaching and learning. These spaces include synthetic grass and other soft surfaces, as well as writable art walls with non-toxic paint or other markers for creative expression. © MooreCo, Inc.
  22. 22. p 22 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Spotlights on Successful Transformation When curriculum lives in the cloud and every student has a mobile device, learning can happen in environments that range from the high-tech to the laid-back. Schools on a budget are even repurposing old furniture into new shapes and configurations. Architects and school leadership are breaking down walls, opening ceilings for sunlight, changing colors, adding sound baffles, writing on walls and encouraging transparency (as in clear partitions). Let’s look at how educators are combining hardware, software, and creative design to personalize learning for today’s digital natives. Ithaca City Schools: Supporting a “Thinking” Strategy Dr. Luvelle Brown is the Superintendent at Ithaca City School District in upstate New York. He’s been to the White House and was named as one of the nation’s most “tech savvy” school superintendents in 2014. But his strategy is far from the“techie” that you might expect. The focus in his district is building thinkers. He asks the question of his school leaders and instructors,“How do we educate in 2016 to engage, educate and empower so as to create thinkers?” His question naturally lead to the conversation about technology and the evolution of the classroom. “As we talked about how to do this, how to promote skills like collaboration, problem- solving, creating and analyzing, it required us to change the spaces,” said Brown.“We have many spaces now with writeable walls, writeable desktops, and flexible seating options. Kids are not sitting in rows in desks and chairs anymore, they’re sitting in flexible seats, seats that move, tables that transition.” In Ithaca schools you’ll see students creating on walls, they’re working in digital spaces, using digital tools and mobile devices. “The color, the look, the feel can be shocking at times,” said Brown.“For the teachers who were very successful in the school district many years ago to come back and see it now, they wonder‘Wow, that’s not the place that I went, where I was so successful. It looks Transitioning to digital curriculum launches districts and schools into the redesign of the classroom
  23. 23. p 23 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report very different now’ and the conversation has been about how to be comfortable with it looking so different.” Dr. Brown has talked with architects about the design of schools and discussed the common trends that are now the expected: sun lighting, how the sound is being handled with baffling systems, the look, the feel and color, all of which promote learning. But beyond the architects they also surveyed their students and teachers to inform them of what they feel the spaces should look like and without spending a lot of money. They’ve used the latest furniture and Idea Paint but it’s not only new materials.“We even repurposed old furniture,” said Brown.“The kids will make their own chair or desk in a shop. And we’ve bought hundreds of yoga balls for classrooms. It’s more about the pedagogy. How we want to shift the teaching/learning process and then it’s the tools, i.e., the mobile device or the table or chair, which support that. And we’ve had that conversation again with architects and they’ve been helpful in helping us design these spaces with all this taken into consideration.” Ascension Public Schools: Mirroring Success At Lake Elementary School, part of Lousiana’s Ascension Public Schools, Morgan Hutchinson’s 6th-grade social studies classes are totally techified. Each of her students has an iPad, and Classflow software connects all of the tablets to a Promethean ActivWall, a 102-inch wide interactive learning system that makes your usual whiteboard look like a Post-It note. You might think that having such so many screens in the classroom would leave students isolated in their own little worlds, but Hutchinson says that the effect is just the opposite. Her classroom “allows for constant interaction and assessment of my students. Grouping, polling, on-the-fly assessments that you can send to certain or all students. It definitely keeps the kids on their toes.” Writable desks, walls, and digital whiteboards increase engagement with group work and problem solving at Ithaca City School District in upstate New York.
  24. 24. p 24 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Each day, a randomly chosen student becomes the “teacher” who calls on students to mirror their work on the board for the class to discuss. Hutchinson most often uses the Mirroring feature, which allows students to share their screens to the ActivWall. She explained,“If I were to ask the students a document-based question with the text and question on the board, when the students submit their answers I can choose a strong model to share with the class simply by allowing that student to mirror their response.”And, she added,“Interactive activities and assessments can be delivered and graded in real time, throughout the lesson. As educators we know time is not usually on our side, so these quick tools of assessment are a huge help.” At Dutchtown Middle School, also in Ascension Parish, Glenda Mora uses a similar set-up to teach 8th-grade math. She’s never the only one teaching in her classroom, though. Thanks to the tech infrastructure at their fingertips, she said,“The students are the ones running the class.” Each day, a randomly chosen student becomes the“teacher” who calls on students to mirror their work on the board for the class to discuss. Mora said her students have“become accustomed to sharing their work, whether they think it is right or wrong. Because if it is wrong, they know they will get feedback that will be meaningful to them.” The network of connected screens also allows Mora to“see my students’ thinking in an instant, which lends itself beautifully to math problems.” She recalled a recent assignment on the Pythagorean theorem. One student used the Mirroring feature and“sent up a video of her working out the problem and also her‘thinking’ while she was working. She said things like,‘When I read that the farmer had to go through the field, I knew that meant that route was the hypotenuse and it would be c in my equation.’ She taught the class for me that day. In an instant, the others knew how to solve the problem but most importantly, how to think about solving the problem.” Connects Learning Center: A “Home Away From Home” For Stacey Adamczyk, the lead teacher at Wisconsin’s Connects Learning Center (CLC), a four-district consortium alternative high school for youth at risk, “Creating the right learning spaces for these students to thrive in has been an integral element to our students’ success.” The school started with students sitting at desks, but with no assigned seating. Through trial and error, CLC’s learning spaces evolved to become less like traditional classrooms and more like a“home away from home,” according to Adamczyk. Wisconsin’s Connects Learning Center (CLC) classrooms evolved to become less like traditional classrooms and more like a “home away from home” with comfortable lounge-style movable furniture, which is also conducive to collaboration.
  25. 25. p 25 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report “Much like college, our learning spaces are filled with comfy couches, chairs, and lounge furniture for student use, as well as areas conducive to collaboration.” These shared spaces create a sense of community and give CLC’s students“the feeling that they are not alone, that they belong.” Using cloud-based curriculum from Odysseyware, CLC couples its non-traditional spaces with a non-traditional daily schedule.“We operate two three-hour sessions per day,” said Adamczyk,“with 80% of student time being spent working individually online. Thanks to the flexibility of Odysseyware, our teachers are able to create and customize online courses and content based on students’ individual needs.” Courses focus on applied knowledge,creative problem- solving,and decision-making.The synergy of software and space,Adamczyk said,“allows our students to find their ideal spot for learning,and to learn at their own pace.” The digital transformation of Des Plaines School District 62 (IL) started with a question:“How much collaboration can truly be done in a traditional classroom, with its rigid rows of desks and chairs?” According to Assistant Superintendent Dr. Jan Rashid, seeking an answer to this question led district leaders to envision their classroom of the future.“We dreamed of creating open and colorful spaces equipped with ergonomic furniture, breakout rooms, and the equal opportunity to use the newest technology. We also wanted spaces to bridge the gap between the traditional library and the technology-filled classroom.” To make that dream a reality, the district, which includes eleven schools (one K-8, two middle schools, and eight elementary schools) created a five-year master plan to transform one room in each of its schools into what it calls Technology Integrated Learning Environments, or TILE spaces. The TILE rooms are“living laboratories” In Des Plaines School District 62 in Illinois they launched a program to transform one classroom in each of their schools into what they deemed, “Technology Integrated Learning Environments,” or TILE spaces. The goal is equity for all, teaching students digital literacy and giving them the ability to engage and collaborate using the newest technology available.
  26. 26. p 26 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report where each teacher and student has equal opportunity to engage and collaborate using the newest technology available. Walk into a TILE space and you’ll see two interactive whiteboards, tablet computers, floor-to-ceiling marker boards, and tackable walls to inspire creative thinking and collaboration sessions. Wherever possible, the district used glass walls to let in natural light and created breakout spaces where students can work in small groups. Each room is also equipped with colorful, versatile, and mobile furniture such as ergonomically correct chairs that have been shown to improve cognitive engagement. To make sure that Des Plaines’ students are making proper use of all the online learning materials at their disposal, the district emphasizes digital literacy.“As students and teachers transition from paperback books and encyclopedias to online resources, we’ve discovered digital literacy doesn’t come naturally,” said Rashid.“Our media specialists and teachers use a co-teaching/co- planning model to serve our digital natives and teach digital literacy.” To help students fine-tune their digital literacy skills, the district equips them with an entire library in their backpacks. With myON, a digital literacy environment offering more than 10,000 books, Rashid said,“We harnessed the power of the digital library by creating and sharing digital bookshelves on diverse topics and at various Lexile levels.” The transition to digital in today’s classrooms provides more opportunities than ever to individualize learning opportunities for every student.“We know that learning occurs wherever and whenever our children happen to be – and if we want to help guide that learning we need to be there, virtually or in person,” said Todd Brekhus, President of myON.“Digital technologies like those that underpin the myON personalized literacy environment offer guidance along with choice. Children take ownership over their reading, becoming vested in learning to read, so they can cultivate a habit of reading to learn that lasts a lifetime.” The next phase of Des Plaines high-tech makeover is to create“green rooms” where students can collaborate on the creation, recording, and editing of videos. A green room opened in one school this year and more are in the works, but Rashid’s vision goes beyond mere physical spaces. She wants to update not just spaces, but thinking. “Shifting the thoughts of administration, teachers, and students into the future will better prepare students for their future as learners who carry these skills into their professional lives and eventually go on to mold the future of technology use.” “Shifting the thoughts of administration, teachers, and students into the future will better prepare students for their future as learners who carry these skills into their professional lives and eventually go on to mold the future of technology use.” —Dr. Jan Rachid Des Plaines School District 62 (IL) LC
  27. 27. p 27 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report We are more than reading! myON expands the classroom for teachers and students by providing unlimited access to a collection of more than 10,000 enhanced digital books with multimedia supports, a suite of literacy tools, embedded assessments and real- time reporting. But there is more! myON provides solutions for: • Differentiated Instruction • Daily 5 • Blended Learning • English Language Learners • Summer Reading • STEM • Independent Reading • Extending the Learning Day • Preparation for Online Testing • Cross-curricular Instruction • Before & After School Programs • Writing Projects • Project-based Learning • Lesson Plans • Measurement • Quizzes • Close Reading • Independent Reading • Fluency • Struggling Readers • NGSS • Active Reading • Guided Reading • Small Group Instruction • Special Education • AND MORE! www.myON.com 1.800.864.3899 facebook.com/myONfanclub @myONreader
  28. 28. p 28 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Textbooks budget-friendly stays current customizable X X X E-Books budget-friendly stays current customizable — X X Licensed Digital Curriculum budget-friendly stays current customizable — — — Open Educational Resources budget-friendly stays current customizable √ — — Curriculum Foundry Progression of Digital Curriculum Adoption for School Districts FUTURE PRESENT PAST District-Authored Digital Curriculum budget-friendly stays current customizable √ √ √ Does your school or district want to transition away from expensive textbooks that quickly become outdated, and move towards adopting digital content that is more flexible? Curriculum Foundry is a complete curriculum management system that can help your district achieve its digital content adoption goals. · Incorporate your district’s existing library of e-books and licensed digital curriculum from day one. · Access a vetted repository of standards-aligned OER to begin replacing more expensive resources. · Move towards a fully district-authored curriculum at your own pace, with support from a team of Learning.com educators. To learn more, visit: www.learning.com/cf-info.
  29. 29. p 29 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report The Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion Events, held in 30 cities nationally, is where the Learning Counsel hears from leaders who are making the transformation happen all over the U.S. One aspect during this year which has been particularly exciting and inspiring is the number of new teams and the cross-departmental collaboration attending the Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion events from Districts. Those old departmental silos between senior Administrators, the curriculum department and academics leaders and the IT side are no longer strategically viable in isolation. Technology is directly impacting teaching and learning. IT departments have a large say in the shift forward and they need to appreciate their new position. As Lenny Schad, the Chief Information and Technology Officer for Houston ISD put it,“You get your seat at the table and that seat is not guaranteed, you have to keep that seat every single day and the way that you keep it is by positively impacting teaching and learning. In fact, it’s above and beyond even that—you need to redefine ways in which you’re improving and making more efficient, the teaching and learning process, which is what I’m most excited about in this arena. Right now we’re providing a laptop, providing a good network, providing electronic textbooks; that is exciting and that is a game changer, but that’s the tip of the iceberg.” With this new trend of cross-departmental collaboration and a lot of new hires over curriculum supervision, Superintendents have been showing up in scores of cities with their cabinet—to ensure every individual invested in the transformation gained the information to make informed decisions. About a recent event, Superintendent Eric Godfrey of Buckeye Union High School District in Arizona said, “It was a great opportunity to stretch vision, develop your 1:1 initiative and learn about resources and network with vendors. It becomes an (even greater) opportunity when school districts come in teams because in addition to the information present, the team spends the day collaborating and idea-sharing which develops a shared responsibility in creating a digitally enhanced educational environment to improve instruction and learning.” “At every event we see how educators, along with industry experts, work together to enhance the creative construction of digital learning resources,” stated Dr. David Kafitz“The shift isn’t going to happen from only educators pushing it, or just the industry side coming up with the next nifty thing. It’s going to be a collaborative activity. We see this happening in every city.” We are excited to share with you here, just a few of the pictures with our friends from the first half of 2016 as the whole“Remodel” of digital transition is underway. Remodeling Nationwide On tour with the Learning Counsel as we discuss the tactics to shift teaching and learning LeiLani Cauthen, CEO of the Learning Counsel, speaking at the New Jersey Innovation Summit 2016.
  30. 30. p 30 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report “Thank you for your hard work in putting this event together. It was a rewarding experience for me and my colleagues. I personally appreciate your support of this long journey we're making through the digital learning environment. Thanks again." —Leng Fritsche, Ph.D. Assistant Superintendent, Student Assessment Houston ISD Right: LeiLani interviewing Superintendent of Baltimore County Public Schools, Dr. Dallas Dance, about his district’s transition to digital curriculum. Below: Panel discussion at New Jersey Innovation Summit with Dan Alston, Dr. Marc Natanagara, Ted Panagopoulos and Joshua Koen. Right: San Bernardino County Superintendent, Ted Alejandre, speaking at the San Bernardino Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion. Above : Team digital curriculum exercises to develop curriculum coverage based on standards, platforms, security and cost
  31. 31. p 31 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Above: Superintendent panel at Phoenix Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion:— Micheal Wright, Superintendent of Blue Ridge Unified School District #32; Eric Godfrey, Superintendent of Buckeye Union High School District and Dr. Darwin Stiffler, Superintendent of Yuma Elementary School District One Above: Bradley Leon, Chief of Innovation and Strategy at Shelby County Schools speaks on the panel at the Memphis Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion. Right: Proclamation from the Mayor of Houston presented to the Learning Counsel and all Houston Area school districts for their dedication to bringing digital equity to all our students; L-R: Steve Wentz, CTO of Pasadena USD; Tom Yarbrough of Huawei; LeiLani Cauthen and Dr. David Kafitz of the Learning Counsel; Dr. Juliet Stipeche from the Office of the Mayor; Dr. Andrew Houlihan, CAO of Houston ISD; and Lenny Schad, CTIO of Houston ISD Below: LeiLani Cauthen with the awesomely engaged team from Little Rock School District (AR) at the Memphis Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion Above: LeiLani with Dr. Darryl Adams, Superintendent of Coachella Valley Unified School District, at summit in San Diego
  32. 32. p 32 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Above: Rudy Gomez, District Technology Services Supervisor, and Linda Ashida, Coordinator of Innovative Teaching and Learning, both from High School District 214, work together at the Chicago Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion. Right: Kimberley Harrington, Chief Academic officer of the New Jersey Department of Education welcoming over 300 attendees to the New Jersey Innovation Summit 2016. Above: Dr. David Kafitz moderating the student panel at the New Jersey Innovation Summit. Above: Mr. David Bezzant with a student panel from Renton Prep at the Seattle Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion, hosted at T-Mobile Headquarters Above: Atlanta Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion panel with Dr. David Kafitz, Jay Heap, Director of Virtual Learning at the Georgia Department of Education; Chris Ragsdale, Superintendent of Cobb County School District; Keith George, Education Specialist at the Alabama Department of Education and Tricia Kennedy, Executive Director of eCLASS Transformation at Gwinnett County Public Schools Above: LeiLani telling secrets to Sue Gott, CTO of the San Bernardino County Superintendent’s office during an exercise at their Digital Curriculum Tactics Discussion.
  33. 33. p 33 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report Core Clicks is the close reading program no student can resist! Completelyweb-based,thisK–5programcombinesshortinformational texts with captivating digital features to build the close reading skills required by rigorous academic standards. It also provides digital test- taking practice with performance-based assessments and tracking and reporting tools. Learn more at www.scholastic.com/coreclicks. Meerkat is a real-time, mobile application based communication platform enabling schools  to communicate time-sensitive information to subscribers. The many features keep parents, students, and faculty safer and more informed.  Additionally, schools have the ability to generate over $15K per year in sponsorship revenue. For more information, visit www.meerkatalerts.com. Fall 2016 Events Sep 13 Tampa, FL Sep 15 Denver, CO Sep 20 Indianapolis, IN Sep 22 New York City, NY Sep 27 Portland, OR Sep 29 Dallas, TX Oct 6 Wichita, KS Oct 11 Washington DC Oct 13 Dover, MA Oct 18 Sacramento, CA Nov 1 San Diego, CA Nov 3 Palo Alto, CA Nov14-15 National Gathering Orlando, FL 2017 Events Jan 19 Seattle, WA Jan 31 Atlanta, GA Feb 2 Charlotte, NC Feb 16 Memphis, TN Feb 23 Philadelphia, PA Feb 28 Los Angeles, CA Mar 2 Phoenix, AZ Mar 9 Minneapolis, MN Mar 14 Columbus, OH Mar 21 San Antonio, TX Mar 23 Richmond, VA Mar 28 Chicago, IL Mar 30 Houston, TX Sep 12 San Diego, CA Sep 14 Denver, CO Sep 19 Indianapolis, IN Sep 26 Tampa, FL Sep 28 New York City, Long Island Oct 3 Portland, OR Oct 5 Dallas, TX Oct 10 St. Louis, MO Oct 17 Boston Area Oct 19 Washington DC Oct 24 Sacramento Oct 26 San Francisco Bay Area Nov 6-7 National Gathering Las Vegas, NV (Dates Subject to Change) Join The Learning Counsel in a City Near You 2016-2017 Digital Curriculum Discussion Meetings the Learning Counsel ▪ 3636 Auburn Blvd ▪ Sacramento, CA 95821 ▪ 888.611.7709 ▪ www.thelearningcounsel.com 2016 Digital Curriculum Strategy Survey and Assessment Tool Research & Context on the Shift to Digital Curriculum The Learning Counsel is providing this assessent tool for use to K-12 educators about digital curricum strategies. Ten finalists from the survey responses will be selected to join us at the National Gathering Event and Awards Ceremony in November. Go to www.thelearningcounsel.com/2016-survey
  34. 34. p 34 of 34 Remodeling ▪ Special Report nowStory The Story of What You Know Knowstory is the place to make your company’s or school’s story known. If you have a place to learn or something to know, create a profile and list every product, piece of curriculum, or course or place. It’s built for that. If you’re a group of educators, here is where you individually build a library list of what you have, or that you made, and share it so your school has one inventory to analyze. We call it “Invenstory.” Knowstory is both a marketplace with analytics for users of digital curriculum and a social media hub, with an education purpose. It’s not a school or a course or an App, but a place for personal learning to find its path inside or outside of schools, with anyone putting in any knowledge they have crafted so we all can find it, and build on it. Go ahead and put in your school, your team, your Apps, websites, ebooks, games, lesson plans. And YOU. Everyone has a story. What’s yours? KnowStory is a FREE new social media platform for everyone. Here is where you discover the wide-range of learning things and create your life-long learning story. For more information, visit www.KnowStory.com.

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