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PR101 - Media Relations, Social Media, Crisis Management - PRecious Communications (Nov2014)

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PR101 - Media Relations, Social Media, Crisis Management - PRecious Communications (Nov2014)

  1. 1. Lars Voedisch Principal Consultant lars@preciouscomms.com @larsv
  2. 2. Or: The not so glorious life of a PR practicioner
  3. 3. About Us We are a boutique agency made up of highly adaptive, responsive and self empowered people. Each of our team members have a strong background knowledge in a specific industry on top of public relations experience. As a team, we aim to provide our clients the best working experience through active listening and understanding of needs. November 20, 2014 © PRecious Communications 2014 3
  4. 4. What we do Summaroutcome present client Execute required ideas Propose relevant ideas UnderstClient’s needs November 20, 2014 © PRecious Communications 2014 4 Social Media Press release Events Interviews Newsletters And other initiatives
  5. 5. © PRecious Communications 2014 5 Start-ups kluje.com PlayMooLah Smaato 99.co Healthcare Miradry Bone Marrow Donor Program Finance Dow Jones DBS Citi Bank One Asia Investment Partners Technology LG Gentay McAfee Motorola Evernote
  6. 6. Some of our clients November 20, 2014 © PRecious Communications 2014 6
  7. 7. 1 in 4 million
  8. 8. 1 + 1 = 2.5
  9. 9. 10
  10. 10. 20 vs 5
  11. 11. 911
  12. 12. 2000
  13. 13. brand messages/day 10 years ago
  14. 14. 4,000
  15. 15. brand messages/day today
  16. 16. 30,000
  17. 17. 500,000
  18. 18. 6,000,000,000
  19. 19. 20,000,000,000
  20. 20. Infinity
  21. 21. You can not NOT communicate •What is your brand promise? •Does your brand have a personality? •How do you earn trust? 30 Branding is first and foremost about gaining trust.
  22. 22. •Be (Seen) Innovative – But Please Don’t Take Any Risk, Use Only Proven Methods The BIG Cultural Dilemma 31
  23. 23. Online Engagement? Customers are very demanding! [Brands] have to surprise me, not only meet my needs, but anticipate my needs. By using social media exclusively, I think the company has to answer me whenever I have a question, enlighten me whenever I complain, and thank me whenever I compliment them. Source: The Language of Love in Social Media - Firefly Millward Brown 32
  24. 24. •From natural respect to suspicion •Are you approachable? •Why would people want to connect with you? The BIG Cultural Dilemma #2 33
  25. 25. Video: Street Interview
  26. 26. Building or maintaining an organization’s relations with its various publics (groups of people who are important to it)
  27. 27. •Two- way communication. •More cost effective as compared to other forms of communication. •Perception of an impartial opinion and reviewed in the media. •Essential tool in business growth. •Reputation and credibility as important as product and support. •Messaging helps to position the company/brand/products, conveying its key attributes and value proposition. Important! Your message to your target audience
  28. 28. 1.The idea behind the story conveyed in a few words. 2.Communicating your story. 3.Graft powerful words together that pique emotion, stimulate a need, elicit a vision, and produce engagement. 4.Deliver the right content at the right time. 5.Share your content through multiple channels. 6.Be honest with your supporters.
  29. 29. Curiosity •Content that reveals secrets. •E.g.: Product leaks. Motivation •Content that reminds us that dreams can come true. Against the odds •David vs Goliath. Small is beautiful, big is advantage •Content that reminds us what we do matters. Affirmation •Content that confirms our assumption. Sensationalism •Content with unexpected twist. Feel good story •Content that tells a great story. New discovery •Content that challenges our discovery. Transformation •Content that inspires us to action.
  30. 30. Press Release Whitepaper Interview Holding Statement Byline Article Photo Story Round Table Event Research Comment ? Case Study Blog Post Opinion Piece Video Keynote Address Review Programme Exclusive Infographic Background Talk PR Stunt Advertorial Press Conference Survey Media Advisory
  31. 31. •Found that fans wanted to share their own stories of ways they would connect with the brand. Focused on customer stories. Let fans tell your story •Launched the model in several U.S. cities and online with the help of its fans. Rethink how you share news •Produced tie-in content on other platforms to help the series reach a wider audience. Share content everywhere you can •Importance of keeping campaigns simple and giving fans a venue for being part of something larger than themselves. Be willing to experiment and learn from mistakes Case Study: Ford Motor
  32. 32. Why How What Adapted from: The Golden Circle by Simon Sinek What is essential to know? How can one benefit from your story (or product) Why should people care? •Connects people, and gets people engaged and interested. •Brings real personality to what it is you do. •Brings your business alive.
  33. 33. Why How What Adapted from: The Golden Circle by Simon Sinek What is essential to know? How can one benefit from your story (or product) Why should people care? •Connects people, and gets people engaged and interested. •Brings real personality to what it is you do. •Brings your business alive. For talking to the media that leads to two main questions…
  34. 34. Why How What Adapted from: The Golden Circle by Simon Sinek What is essential to know? How can one benefit from your story (or product) Why should people care? •Connects people, and gets people engaged and interested. •Brings real personality to what it is you do. •Brings your business alive. Why NOW Why ME
  35. 35. Who •Customers •Potential customers •Suppliers •Advertisers •Media •Financial bodies •Regulatory and government bodies •Industry groups and other networks What •Age •Gender •Occupation or qualification •Geography •Socio-economic group •Family structure •Lifestyle How •Choice of words •Use of jargons and technical terms •Tone •Focus •The design and feel of the communication •The medium used
  36. 36. 1.unexpected (i.e., a surprise) 2.creates uncertainty 3.is seen as a threat to important goals 50
  37. 37. 51
  38. 38. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? 52
  39. 39. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? When a crisis happens: Get it fast, Get it right, Get it out, and Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin Time is crucial for managing risk as it allows you to stay in the ‘driver seat’
  40. 40. Crisis Fundamentals Emergence: Issue gets public Spreading: Growing interest Establishment: Full crisis Erosion: Relevance declines Potential: Known areas YOU? When a crisis happens: Get it fast, Get it right, Get it out, and Get it over! Your problem won’t improve with age. N. Augustine, CEO Lockhead Martin Time is crucial for managing risk as it allows you to stay in the ‘driver seat’ 33% of global CCOs are not prepared for social media based reputation threats !!!
  41. 41. The majority of all crises come from within an organization. 55
  42. 42. 56 Source: Not So SMRT: A Case Study of Communications Failure - Skribe Key Learnings 1)Speed is critical (on Twitter) 2)Honesty is a virtue 3)Make your CEO visible 4)Brands have to be on alert in order to correct any false assumptions before they reach critical mass 5)Track it
  43. 43. Nestlé's social media crisis 57
  44. 44. Nestlé's social media crisis Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign 58
  45. 45. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page 59
  46. 46. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” 60
  47. 47. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 61
  48. 48. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable 62
  49. 49. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 63 Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable
  50. 50. Nestlé unwillingly put public attention to Greenpeace's video campaign Activists change their Facebook profile photos to anti-Nestlé slogans and start posting to the Nestlé fan page Nestlé: “To repeat: we welcome your comments, but please don't post using an altered version of any of our logos as your profile pic--they will be deleted” Now it even went worse with all kinds of criticism, allegations and simple insults being posted (e.g. bottled water dispute in the US, “killing babies”…) 64 Key learnings: Control? You never had it. Don't use lawyers to take things off the Internet Admit it, stop it, and apologize. FAST! Customers criticizing you are telling you something very valuable What are your Rules of Engagement? A crisis response protocol? How fast can you react? Who decides?
  51. 51. ‘Classic’ Case Study: Domino’s YouTube Experience •Domino’s Pizza Chain discovered the power of viral marketing last month: two employees in the US filmed "prank" videos of themselves stuffing cheese up their noses and then putting it into sandwiches. •The video went popular on YouTube (over 1 million views), and Twitter lit up with disgusted customer complaints. •Domino’s apologized and put its own President on YouTube, started a Twitter response site; •Still: In just a few days, Domino’s reputation was damaged. 65
  52. 52. •Key ingredient for business success still a product or service that uniquely fulfils the needs of the end user. •May result in negative comments from employees about the company or potential legal consequences if employees use these sites to view objectionable, illicit or offensive material. •With great power come great responsibilities. If it is not utilized properly it may cause severe loss to your business. Social media is a very sensitive tool. •Pick up a wrong social media marketing strategy you can end up damaging your brand image and reputation in the market.
  53. 53. •Small mistakes are magnified in front of thousands of people. •Worst case: People might not even care! •Can be also recklessly used for hampering the reputation of the organization as well. •Building communities takes a lot of time and efforts – in a situation where’s a growing social media (or more: Facebook) fatique kicking in •In the end: Where is your target audience?
  54. 54. Content that inspires high-energy emotions far more likely to be shared. Practically useful, surprising, and interesting More likely to be shared
  55. 55. Humour •62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies. •“Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.” Content with an emotional tone Fame of the author •Slightly more important than content
  56. 56. •62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies. •“Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.” Content with an emotional tone Fame of the author •Slightly more important than content Humour or Ridicule!
  57. 57. •62% of ads being aired by Fortune 500 companies, 60% of viral ads were being generated by the smaller companies. •“Humour was employed at near unanimous levels for all viral advertisements. Consequently, this study identified humour as the universal appeal for making content viral.” Content with an emotional tone Fame of the author •Slightly more important than content Humour or Ridicule!
  58. 58. Viral video. Viral mistake. Viral opportunity? •If your content goes viral, find a way to harness this new audience. Who’s seeing your content? •Best-case opportunity can become worst-case scenario. •Plan ahead and understand how your website can handle more visits. Can there be too much of a good thing? •If people have misconstrued or parodied your message, how do you rectify? Can your reputation stand the attention? •Unpredictable digital marketplace. •A leaked video or telephone conversation can blow up into a PR disaster (or opportunity). •No one can control viral content. How will you handle the unexpected?
  59. 59. •Know your story (elevator pitch) •Have a simple PR kit –Corporate background, product factsheet, executive biographies •Follow your competitors - allows you to see what they are doing, as they do it, as well as keeps you up-to-date on their progress, ideas, updates, and more! •More than just Facebook “likes” or media clips - brand must drive marketing value and not merely be seen. •Have a plan – and if it is trial & error. Accept defeat at certain points and move on.
  60. 60. •Forgetting to ask why people should actually care. •Social isn’t the place for the hard sell or self- promotion. •You don’t have to be everywhere. •You don’t have to keep up with the big brands. You can’t. Accept it! •Social Media isn’t “Free”, it takes a loooot of time which may need for other things. •Not knowing who and where your audience is. •Not planning or having clear objectives. What do you want to achieve? •Not using the tools to analyze what you are doing. •Keeping momentum beyond the first buzz.
  61. 61. •Take 5 minutes and define what you want to be for your key stakeholders •For each stakeholder group, think of maximum 3 key messages! •Practice and refine. Then do it again. •If in doubt, you have questions or feel like having a coffee or beer – call us!
  62. 62. 81 Social media requires your attention 24/7. The media landscape is fast changing and eroding. Brand perceptions are shifting as you read. Customers are demanding a more human approach to communication. We provide : Communications Strategy | Traditional & Social Media Relations Digital Engagement | Crisis Preparedness & Management Internal Communications | Media Training Analysis, Measurement, Research Where are you? Your Reputation is PRecious

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