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The difference between art & design

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The Difference between
Art & Design
Art = a transformative experience
Design = a communicative experience
Kit Laybourne 10...
The Difference between Art & Design
Art = a transformative experience
Design = a communicative experience
• Art is a trans...
The Difference between Art & Design
Art = a transformative experience
Design = a communicative experience
• Design is a co...
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The difference between art & design

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These slides argue for a rigorous Design Process to make work better within the shot-first-edit-second world of media production. Developed by Kit Laybourne for the MA Program in Media Studies at the New School, in NYC.

These slides argue for a rigorous Design Process to make work better within the shot-first-edit-second world of media production. Developed by Kit Laybourne for the MA Program in Media Studies at the New School, in NYC.

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The difference between art & design

  1. 1. The Difference between Art & Design Art = a transformative experience Design = a communicative experience Kit Laybourne 10/27/08
  2. 2. The Difference between Art & Design Art = a transformative experience Design = a communicative experience • Art is a transformative experience. • Art changes the way you are -- at least for a few moments. Art has a payload of epiphany.
  3. 3. The Difference between Art & Design Art = a transformative experience Design = a communicative experience • Design is a communicative experience. • Design brings you targeted information, emotion and, often, a call to action. Design has a payload of content.
  4. 4. ART inspire, delight, amuse, transform The Creator’s Intent is key: DESIGN inform, communicate, instruct call to action • The creator’s “intent” is the key to difference between Art & Design • Not always easy to distinguish between Art & Design. Art can contain a message. Design can be beautiful and moving.
  5. 5. The Design Process The Design Process specifies procedures which “seek creative success through providing a client with innovative and unique design solutions to a defined project, done on rational grounds, through an agreed-upon process.” There are 8 steps in the design process....
  6. 6. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) • First of all, let me say that this is my own version of the design process. You will find various versions with different numbers of steps. • But they all are basically the same -- they prescribe a rigorous protocol for the practice of design -- and it works for media of all kinds. • My assignment for this class was for you to read a full articulation of these 8 steps. • I am going to review the 8 steps very, very quickly, so that this stuff will sink in.
  7. 7. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) The initial step is one of intense intellectual scrutiny. The designer (or design team) must study the “problem” or “challenge” that has been given to them. Analysis is required, but so is lots of fact finding and deep interrogation of the project’s client. The outcome is often termed “the design brief.” The PDF I posted shows ...Eight Elements of a Generic “Design Brief” 1. Formulate a specific Design “Problem” you are attempting to solve. 2. Determine Target Audience 3. Identify Intent 4. Identify Content 5. Specify Outcomes. 6. Chart the Media Ecology- the competition - compelling precedents (either as good or bad models) - how to leverage other’s work/networks- polls / research data that is relevant 7. Determine Production Resources 8. Propose Design Solution(s)
  8. 8. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) The second step in the Design Process is the most overtly creative one. • Its beyond the scope of this talk to give detail. See the PDF which reviews..... Brainstorming - a rigorous process often misused. To do it right there are five steps Creative Wordplay - notebooks, bubble charts, opposites, color words, metaphors, etc Multi-Media Sketching - clip art, photography, illustration, storyboarding, typography, & more Mental Back Burner - dreams, assigned inattention, fantasy
  9. 9. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) It is always best to assemble and present a choice of three possible solutions. If you nurture three different ideas….. .... you don’t fall in love with one solution too soon .... you objectify the criteria (because they are applied to three ideas) .... you cross fertilize the three ideas with related or parallel thinking .... you remain detached; rational; ready to make the best choice.
  10. 10. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) 4. Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) Work it out on Paper. Take your time. Its inexpensive, flexible, universally communicated. A Treatment is the document in which you refine the creative approach that has been selected. A Storyboard or Script is an object of applied imagination. It should be the closest approximation you can make to the media experience you foresee.
  11. 11. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) • You start to fashion your project as you lay out the production plan. • This is the phase of tactics. • Regardless of whether your project is large or small, expensive or cheap, requiring lots of collaboration or not, the designer must prepare two obligatory documents: The Schedule & The Budget.
  12. 12. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) • In an ideal world, this is the phase where the design work becomes realized. While the basic idea/approach can change here, it is always expensive to do so. • you will find work is commonly divided into three production phases: Pre-production - Script Lock - Location Scouting - Casting - Booking Talent - Research Production - Hiring Crew - Shooting - Rights Clearances - Acquiring Stock & Archival materials Post Production - Editing (Rough Cut, Fine Cut, Pix lock) - Music - Voice over - Color correct - Track Mix - Credits & Titles
  13. 13. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) slide: 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) The moment of judgment. You’ve done your best. Probably some things didn’t turn out quite like you’d have wanted them. But the work is complete and your design chops will now receive serious scrutiny. The Design Process involves three tasks at this juncture: Final screening - first with the client, then with the targeted audience(s). Delivery of elements - tapes, music, reports, agreements, files, etc. Archiving - its often required that you pack scripts, paper work and all source materials in secure, long-term storage. - its comforting to remember that projects often have second lives. So there may be subsequent versions that will be easier because you’ve done so much of the design work.
  14. 14. The Design Process 1. The Design Brief (due diligence) 2. Ideation (coming up with ideas) 3. Multiple Approaches (always 3 pitches) 4.Treatment, Storyboard & Script (the paper proxy) 5. Production Plan (logistics and wherewithal) 6. Execution (production, per se) 7. Delivery (here it is, hope it works) 8. Evaluation (starting what is next) Smart creatives always find time to take stock of how a given project came out vis-à-vis what was contemplated in the Treatment and Design Brief. “Post Mortems” - meeting with your client, colleagues and key vendors. Formal Testing - by focus groups, ratings, usability testing, sales figures, etc. “What’s next?” - the end of one project can also be the start of the next. - have you learned enough about your client’s mission to identify new communications needs? A look in the mirror - was the effort this worth it? - did I have fun? - did I meet and work with good people?
  15. 15. The Design Process Take away: big projects or small, there is a tested, preferred way to do good creative. end

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