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Getting into Public Speaking
Its really fun,
especially when you don’t think about it
Why speak?
Speaking Benefits
● Career development
○ Good way to demonstrate your experience and soft skills
○ Helps you evaluate the ...
Barriers to speaking
● Imposter syndrome
○ You simply feel that you do not have anything interesting to say
■ This happens...
My speaking history
● Started at University
○ Hated the idea of giving a final year project presentation, it felt awful
■ ...
Applying to Speak
Tips for CfP’s, getting noticed, etc.
Replying to a Call for Papers (CfP)
Call for Papers is a common way to find speakers for a conference
- The conference web...
How often should I apply ?
● Is it bad to submit more than one talk to a conference ?
○ No, submit as many different talks...
Writing a good title
Writing good titles is hard & takes practice
A good title should be clear and to the point
Write down...
Examples: Bad Titles
Clojure.spec | Clojure.spec is awesome | What I did with Clojure.spec
- Too vague. What about it? Wha...
Examples: Good Titles (subjective)
Effective testing with Clojure.spec & generative tests
Persisting data as EDN types in ...
Tips on writing good titles
● Write down as many variations of the titles first, then delete the ones that are not
so good...
Exercise:
Write a few talk titles
Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
Writing a good abstract
Needs to convey what the talk is all about
● What specifically will you learn ?
● Why is it valuab...
Exercise:
Write an abstract (or two)
Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
Writing a good bio
Make it short and to the point and full of any useful information relevant to the event
- Blog posts, b...
Creating an effective digital presence
● Body of work
● Social media
● Detailed history
● Consistent branding
Related arti...
Exercise:
Write a bio for yourself
Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
Speaking at London Clojurians
● meetup.com/london-clojurians - send a message to the organisers
● London-clojurians.org - ...
Clojurian Community in Person
Probably the most active language-specific
developer communities in London
Creating your content
Traditonal Slides approach
● Powerpoint, Keynote or Google Slides
○ Simple to use and if you pick a nice theme they they l...
Traditional slides approach
● Powerpoint, Keynote or Google Slides
○ Simple to use and if you pick a nice theme they they ...
Modern slides approach
● Prezzi & Reveal.js (also org-reveal for Emacs)
○ Offer different presentation options, but requir...
Workshop approach
● Gitbook.io, readthedocs, Jekyll
○ Really useful services for creating good
looking workshop content
■ ...
Demo / Live coding
● Demos
○ Seeing something in action is very engaging for the audience
■ Avoid making it a boring produ...
Presenting your content
Make sure people can see your content
● Display your slides / code and go stand at the back of the room
○ Tweak the size o...
Talk to the Audience
● Obvious statement, but easy to forget
● Make eye contact, but don’t stare
○ Make eye contact for se...
Avoiding Nerves
● Everyone gets nervous about presenting, its natural and can be beneficial
○ Nerves produce more adrenali...
Exercise:
Present a lightning talk ?
Exercise:
… or go to the pub / home
Thank you
@jr0cket
https://jr0cket.co.uk
Take your own journey into Clojure
Thank you
@jr0cket
jr0cket.co.uk
Learning by teaching others
I really started thinking in Clojure when I started talking to & teaching others
- Coding dojo...
Getting into public speaking at conferences
Getting into public speaking at conferences
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Getting into public speaking at conferences

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My experiences and tips on submitting talks and public speaking at conferences, for the London Clojurians meetup August 2016

Publicada em: Tecnologia
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Getting into public speaking at conferences

  1. 1. Getting into Public Speaking Its really fun, especially when you don’t think about it
  2. 2. Why speak?
  3. 3. Speaking Benefits ● Career development ○ Good way to demonstrate your experience and soft skills ○ Helps you evaluate the level of your own understanding (builds confidence) ● Learn more ○ Preparing for a talk help you learn new things ○ Giving a talk and receiving feedback also helps you learn new things ● Conferences & Events are even more fun ○ Usually get free conference tickets (sometimes for a friend too) ○ Travel paid (usually if you are a key speaker or could otherwise not attend) ○ People will ask your advice
  4. 4. Barriers to speaking ● Imposter syndrome ○ You simply feel that you do not have anything interesting to say ■ This happens a lot, even to seasoned speakers ■ Everyone has lots of experiences to share though ● Lack of experience ○ You have never done any public speaking, so you feel you could not do it. ■ Catch 22. Start of with the simplest possible thing, an informal talk at work, a short talk at a meetup, etc ● Lack of time ○ You are simply too busy ○ It takes time to prepare & give a presentation ■ All this time spent benefits your career & usually your company too
  5. 5. My speaking history ● Started at University ○ Hated the idea of giving a final year project presentation, it felt awful ■ Had spend days going over what I wanted to say ■ Had spent hours practising & was incredibly nervous ■ Surprised to find it was voted the best presentation ● Started work at a consultancy, including 5 day training workshops ○ Very nervous for a long time until I became more familiar with the content ■ Essentially re-wrote all the training material, made it more practical and full of examples ■ Started to enjoy writing content, as it made it easy to present ● Worked in Finance, giving lots of presentations to different groups of people ○ Helped me empathise and consider what they wanted to know ● Increasingly active in the community, leading to giving lots of talks ● Became a developer advocate / evangelist...
  6. 6. Applying to Speak Tips for CfP’s, getting noticed, etc.
  7. 7. Replying to a Call for Papers (CfP) Call for Papers is a common way to find speakers for a conference - The conference website should provide details of the process, timings & code of conduct - You may only get notified if you are accepted to speak Typically you will submit ● Title - gets the initial attention of the conference organisers ● Abstract - sells the talk to the organisers ● Bio - should give organisers confidence that you have some experience with the subject, usually included a picture
  8. 8. How often should I apply ? ● Is it bad to submit more than one talk to a conference ? ○ No, submit as many different talks as you like ■ (more than 10 may be over-doing it though) ● Is it bad to submit the same talk to more than one conference ? ○ No, submit your talk to as many conferences as you like ■ Ensure the conference topics & themes are relevant to your talk though ● Is it bad to spend a big chunk of your time speaking at conferences ○ No, some people actually get paid to do this ○ Unless you read speaker notes word for word, your talks will be different each time anyway ○ If you are on the speaker circuit then you usually have several talks you can just give at short notice.
  9. 9. Writing a good title Writing good titles is hard & takes practice A good title should be clear and to the point Write down as many versions of a title as you can then pick the best. Ask other people which titles they like. If you are unsure about the title, write the abstract first
  10. 10. Examples: Bad Titles Clojure.spec | Clojure.spec is awesome | What I did with Clojure.spec - Too vague. What about it? What do you want to say about this subject
  11. 11. Examples: Good Titles (subjective) Effective testing with Clojure.spec & generative tests Persisting data as EDN types in Datomic How FundingCircle are guiding developers into Clojure
  12. 12. Tips on writing good titles ● Write down as many variations of the titles first, then delete the ones that are not so good until you only have one left ● Would the title make a good article / blog / newspaper title ? ● Show the titles to others and ask them ● Review the title once you have finished the abstract (if not during writing it)
  13. 13. Exercise: Write a few talk titles Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
  14. 14. Writing a good abstract Needs to convey what the talk is all about ● What specifically will you learn ? ● Why is it valuable to learn about this ? ● How are you going to help us understand what you are talking about ? ● What level of skill / experience do you require ? ●
  15. 15. Exercise: Write an abstract (or two) Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
  16. 16. Writing a good bio Make it short and to the point and full of any useful information relevant to the event - Blog posts, books or previous speaking appearances (dont promote other conferences in your bio though) Example: short & to the point Speaker, author, conference organiser & community obsessed developer. Loves Clojure, Emacs, Cats, Cycling & Agile development http://jr0cket.co.uk Tip: Look at the bio’s from other speakers from a previous years conference, or similar event.
  17. 17. Creating an effective digital presence ● Body of work ● Social media ● Detailed history ● Consistent branding Related articles: http://jr0cket.co.uk/categories/community/
  18. 18. Exercise: Write a bio for yourself Please use the shared Google doc, linked to from the Meetup event
  19. 19. Speaking at London Clojurians ● meetup.com/london-clojurians - send a message to the organisers ● London-clojurians.org - post a message to the mailing list ● clojurians.slack.com - post a message to #clojure-uk ● Tweet me at @jr0cket Related articles: http://jr0cket.co.uk/2016/07/Call-for-Speakers-London-Clojurian-conference-2016.htm l
  20. 20. Clojurian Community in Person Probably the most active language-specific developer communities in London
  21. 21. Creating your content
  22. 22. Traditonal Slides approach ● Powerpoint, Keynote or Google Slides ○ Simple to use and if you pick a nice theme they they look okay ■ Avoid making them over complicated ■ Download copies if using an online service (don't rely on conference wifi) ■ Minimise bullet points (ie. don't use this presentation as an example, it's not great)
  23. 23. Traditional slides approach ● Powerpoint, Keynote or Google Slides ○ Simple to use and if you pick a nice theme they they look okay ■ Avoid making them over complicated, as this wastes time ■ Minimise bullet points (ie. don't use this presentation as an example, it's not great) ○ Google slides & online services are handy if you laptop dies… ■ Download copies if using an online service (don't rely on conference wifi)
  24. 24. Modern slides approach ● Prezzi & Reveal.js (also org-reveal for Emacs) ○ Offer different presentation options, but require more work or initial setup Reveal.js examples at: http://jr0cket.co.uk/slides/
  25. 25. Workshop approach ● Gitbook.io, readthedocs, Jekyll ○ Really useful services for creating good looking workshop content ■ Create content in markdown, asciidoc or reframed text Gitbook example: https://practicalli.gitbook.io/clojure ReadTheDocs example: https://cider.readthedocs.io See my article on
  26. 26. Demo / Live coding ● Demos ○ Seeing something in action is very engaging for the audience ■ Avoid making it a boring product pitch though ■ Create something real, even if you have to pre-create some aspects ■ Create a video backup when you are practicing, just in case the demo gods are angry ● Live coding ○ A great way to explore a language or programming concepts ■ Make sure people understand the syntax you are using ■ Create the code at a good pace, not so slow to make it boring, not to fast that it cannot be followed. ○ Don't do this, its just asking for trouble, unless ■ You practice so often you can type while you are talking (very hard, try it) ■ You have most of the code pre-written ■ You use Git to step through branches, commits or tags
  27. 27. Presenting your content
  28. 28. Make sure people can see your content ● Display your slides / code and go stand at the back of the room ○ Tweak the size of your fonts and colours of your themes ■ Ensure you know how to quickly increase the font size ■ If your editor has profiles, create a demo / presentation one with ~24px font ● Ask the audience if they can see okay ○ It helps you engage with them and see how awake they are
  29. 29. Talk to the Audience ● Obvious statement, but easy to forget ● Make eye contact, but don’t stare ○ Make eye contact for several seconds with several members of the audience during your talk ■ Helps you understand how well the talk is going ■ Helps you connect to the audience ■ People more likely to focus on what you are saying ■ Makes you look like a professional speaker ● Practices to avoid ○ Turning your back on the audience / talking to the screen ○ Staring at one person in the audience because you are nervous or think that they are the only one listening ■ This is hard to avoid if there is only one person in the audience, so have a chat with them instead.
  30. 30. Avoiding Nerves ● Everyone gets nervous about presenting, its natural and can be beneficial ○ Nerves produce more adrenaline, keeping you going through the talk. ● Focus on your talk ○ Ensure you are comfortable with the overall structure of your talk ○ Review slides several times whilst waiting to speak ■ Avoid the temptation to make any major changes ● Avoid other distractions ○ Take time away from the event / people ● Dont dwell on what you are doing, it will make you nervous ● Avoid last minute changes to your slides / demo’s
  31. 31. Exercise: Present a lightning talk ?
  32. 32. Exercise: … or go to the pub / home
  33. 33. Thank you @jr0cket https://jr0cket.co.uk
  34. 34. Take your own journey into Clojure
  35. 35. Thank you @jr0cket jr0cket.co.uk
  36. 36. Learning by teaching others I really started thinking in Clojure when I started talking to & teaching others - Coding dojos - talks on Clojure (starting with the basics, showing the art of the possible) - moving on to running conferences - workshops at hack days

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