O slideshow foi denunciado.
Utilizamos seu perfil e dados de atividades no LinkedIn para personalizar e exibir anúncios mais relevantes. Altere suas preferências de anúncios quando desejar.

How to Set and Achieve Your Startup Goals

28.705 visualizações

Publicada em

Pro.com Founder and CEO Matt Williams details a simple framework to set, track, and evaluate your startup's goals.

  • Does Penis Size REALLY Matter? The truth comes out... ▲▲▲ http://t.cn/Ai88iYkP
       Responder 
    Tem certeza que deseja  Sim  Não
    Insira sua mensagem aqui
  • Download The Complete Lean Belly Breakthrough Program with Special Discount. ♥♥♥ https://tinyurl.com/y6qaaou7
       Responder 
    Tem certeza que deseja  Sim  Não
    Insira sua mensagem aqui
  • Reasons why you should know this homemade recipe to stop your hair loss  http://t.cn/AiHip2fH
       Responder 
    Tem certeza que deseja  Sim  Não
    Insira sua mensagem aqui
  • Memory Improvement: How To Improve Your Memory In Just 30 Days, click here.. ➤➤ https://bit.ly/2GEWG9T
       Responder 
    Tem certeza que deseja  Sim  Não
    Insira sua mensagem aqui
  • 22lbs GONE in 13 days with this strange carb-pairing trick.. ▲▲▲ http://t.cn/AiYhcYmI
       Responder 
    Tem certeza que deseja  Sim  Não
    Insira sua mensagem aqui

How to Set and Achieve Your Startup Goals

  1. Powered by with Matt Williams HOW TO SET & ACHIEVE YOUR STARTUP GOALS
  2. This presentation consists of insights inspired by 33voices® interviews with Jenna Abdou.
  3. FEATURING Matt Williams @talktomw Founder and CEO of Pro.com @getyourpro
  4. The single biggest question entrepreneurs face is: What’s working, and how long is it going to work for?
  5. How do you navigate the tricky dichotomy between persistence and patience?
  6. How do you navigate the tricky dichotomy between persistence and patience? “Measure your business relentlessly. Startups need an operating discipline focused on data and metrics.”
  7. Every quarter, set one or two large goals that drastically drive your business forward and six to 12 smaller goals to make progress on specific metrics.
  8. Your high-level goals should result in a “game-changing shift in conversion, customer behavior, or experience.”
  9. To determine your primary quarterly initiatives, ask yourself:
  10. To determine your primary quarterly initiatives, ask yourself: What are the mission-oriented goals we are going after as a company?
  11. To determine your primary quarterly initiatives, ask yourself: What are the key metrics we are trying to impact?
  12. Approach your smaller goals as pilot experiments focused on specific metrics. For example, a quarterly project can be reducing customer acquisition costs.
  13. Depending on the size of the project and your company’s resources, these experiments should be executed and debriefed quickly.
  14. Depending on the size of the project and your company’s resources, these experiments should be executed and debriefed quickly. A general rule of thumb is not to spend more than two weeks on a trial. However, projects tested by your sales team, for example, may require a longer timeline due to a physical team making calls.
  15. The core benefit of goal setting resides in your time evaluating each goal.
  16. The core benefit of goal setting resides in your time evaluating each goal. “Institute everything for immediate measurement.”
  17. “Debriefs are about data, questions being asked and answered, and decisions being made on next steps.”
  18. Maximize your debrief meetings by implementing a simple, straightforward process to assess projects.
  19. Use these three questions to guide your conversation:
  20. Use these three questions to guide your conversation: What worked?
  21. Use these three questions to guide your conversation: What wasn’t successful?
  22. Use these three questions to guide your conversation: What do the metrics look like?
  23. In both positive and negative ways, your data will reveal unanticipated outcomes. As a company leader, you’re responsible for “determining when to a cut a project and try something new.”
  24. In both positive and negative ways, your data will reveal unanticipated outcomes. As a company leader, you’re responsible for “determining when to a cut a project and try something new.” “You have to be open as an entrepreneur and a team about the honest reality of what is working.”
  25. “If you can set ego aside and exercise humility in your business and the trials you’re performing, you can build a successful company.”
  26. Many times, your team will execute ideas today that you wanted to act on six months ago. Similarly, ideas you’re currently discussing may not come into fruition until 2017.
  27. If you remember one thing: Focus on the data. Your data will tell you when you’re ready.
  28. As each of these processes simultaneously flow throughout your organization, it’s important to find quiet time to review these goals daily. This is critical to shaping the company’s roadmap and evaluating your team’s performance (both individually and collectively), to ensure that everything is on track.
  29. “Startups are nothing but roadblocks.” As a leader, “it’s your job to remove them along the way.”
  30. The most significant way to elevate individual performance is to make it a priority that each team member can confidently answer these two questions.
  31. The most significant way to elevate individual performance is to make it a priority that each team member can confidently answer these two questions. What am I working towards this quarter?
  32. The most significant way to elevate individual performance is to make it a priority that each team member can confidently answer these two questions. How is my progress being measured against this goal?
  33. Ideally, you want to spend one-on-one time with each team member to help them “architect their own path.”
  34. Ideally, you want to spend one-on-one time with each team member to help them “architect their own path.” “In order to be productive, you have to have clarity of goals and mission.”
  35. “Everyone should come to work every day knowing the metric they’re trying to impact.”
  36. Institute weekly check-ins with your team to “establish the top things the company needs to accomplish that week and tie those goals to units of progress.” Review your goals, accompanying metrics, and the next steps to achieve them.
  37. As you work toward each of these goals your competition will be doing the same. Whether or not their’s are successful, avoid focusing on them in “an unhealthy or reactive way.”
  38. While studying their journey enables you to gain valuable lessons about what works and doesn’t work in the industry, “focusing on your competition doesn’t yield results as much as focusing on your customer.” Your customers give you your data. Follow their lead, not your competition’s.
  39. When analyzing your metrics, actively distinguish between customer feedback and behavior.
  40. It’s one thing for a customer to relay a feature they’d like to see in your product. It’s another for them to actually use it. As you test, iterate, and validate experiments “use direct action as feedback.”
  41. A deliberate and unwavering focus on your customers behavior will enable you to maximize this framework by optimizing for tangible growth in the right places.
  42. DIG DEEPER Over 1,095 free interviews and perspectives on company building and life design Sign Up Join our staff-curated weekly highlights, enter weekly giveaways, submit questions to our guests, and use our notes feature. Coaching We partner with you to help you implement the learning & execute the strategies from our distinguished roster of thought leaders, founders and CEOs. Get Answers Ask our expert panel of thought leaders, founders and CEO’s your most pressing question about scaling your business or elevating your life. Register Free Learn More Ask a Question
  43. FIND THIS HELPFUL? Share 33voices with a friend!
  44. CONNECT WITH US Tell us what you think Jenna@33voices.com Presentation by Chase Jennings Insights by Jenna Abdou

×