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A presentation given at the International Image Interoperability Framework event held at Ghent University, Belgium on December 8, 2015.

Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass
Yale Center for British Art

A presentation given at the International Image Interoperability Framework event held at Ghent University, Belgium on December 8, 2015.

Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass
Yale Center for British Art

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IIIF in support of Research

  1. 1. IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 IIIF in support of Research @YaleBritishArt Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  2. 2. About the Center In the digital realm, the Center’s goal is to share its open digital resources in formats that allow for easy creative and scholarly reuse in order to contribute to the study of British Art worldwide. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  3. 3. Yale University’s Open Access Policy General Principle: The preservation, transmission, and advancement of knowledge in the digital age are promoted by the creative use and reuse of digitized content for research, teaching, learning, and creative activities. The goal of digitization is to enhance access to the collections in Yale’s museums, archives, and libraries for students, faculty, and the world. To this end, Yale will make digital copies of unrestricted public domain collections available for use without limitations through the University’s electronic interfaces. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  4. 4. Detail Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  5. 5. Peter Gaspar Scheemakers, 1691–1781, Alexander Pope, ca.1740, Marble, Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection Compare Images Louis François Roubiliac, 1702–1762, Alexander Pope, 1741, Marble, Yale Center for British Art, Gift of Paul Mellon in memory of the British art historian Basil Taylor (1922–1975) Compare Images John Constable, 1776–1837, Hadleigh Castle, The Mouth of the Thames--Morning after a Stormy Night, 1829, Oil on canvas, 48 x 64 ¾ in (121.9 x 164.5 cm), Yale Center for British Art, Paul Mellon Collection John Constable, 1776–1837, Sketch for ‘Hadleigh Castle’ c. 1828 -1829, Oil paint on canvas, 1226 x 1673 mm, Tate Gallery Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  6. 6. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 Create online galleries Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  7. 7. Annotate images Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  8. 8. Annotate images Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 Collaborate on research projects Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  9. 9. Goals of IIIF Yale Center for British Art To give scholars an unprecedented level of uniform and rich access to image-based resources hosted around the world. To define a set of common application programming interfaces that support interoperability between image repositories. To develop, cultivate and document shared technologies that provide a world-class user experience in viewing, comparing, manipulating and annotating images. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  10. 10. Digital Strategy Use technology to make collections as widely accessible as possible • Open Access policy • Data exchange standards and protocols • Open source tools • Linked Open Data Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  11. 11. User Access Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  12. 12. Machine Readable Access – Data exchange standards • Linked Open Data semantic endpoint • CIDOC-CRM • OAI-PMH • LIDO XML Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  13. 13. Contributing to aggregators Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  14. 14. A good marriage Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  15. 15. IIIF – first steps Yale Center for British Art Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  16. 16. CDS – JPEG2000Zoom via IIPMooViewer Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  17. 17. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  18. 18. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  19. 19. “Reformation to Restoration” Research Project Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  20. 20. Collect and compare a range of visual material Yale Center for British Art Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  21. 21. An example Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  22. 22. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 An example, continued. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  23. 23. Annotation and sharing Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015
  24. 24. Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass @edgartdata IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 IIIF and Mirador allow us to leverage our Open Access assets further, specifically engaging scholars.
  25. 25. Thank you emmanuelle.delmas-glass@yale.edu michael.appleby@yale.edu edward.town@yale.edu jessica.david@yale.edu melissa.fournier@yale.edu

Notas do Editor

  • IIIF in support of research at the Yale Center for British Art
    Presented by Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass, Collections Data Manager, Yale Center for British Art
    as part of IIIF: Access to the World's Images - Ghent 2015 (http://iiif.io/event/2015/ghent.html)

    Hi, I’m Emmanuelle Delmas-Glass, from the Yale Center for British Art, and I’m here to speak with you about our current and future use of IIIF.

    I’d like to give credit to my colleagues:

    Michael Appleby, Associate Director, Academic Software Development, ITS
    Melissa Fournier, Imaging Services and IP Manager, Yale Center for British Art
    Edward Town, Postdoctoral Research Associate, Yale Center for British Art
    Jessica David, Associate Conservator of Paintings, Yale Center for British Art

    as this talk draws heavily from their work and presentations on IIIF.
  • The Yale Center for British Art is the most comprehensive collection of British art outside the United Kingdom, and it is part of our core mission to facilitate the study of British Art worldwide, and that of course extends to the digital realm.
  • Open Access, or the capacity to disseminate our digital assets as generously as possible, has been a critical foundation that supports our mission.

    The Center, along with the other Yale museums, was at the forefront of the development of Yale’s Open Access policy for digital images of works in the public domain.

    Since 2011, we have made thousands of high resolution images of our works freely available online. What distinguishes us from others is that we are making them freely available even for commercial purposes.

    Today, with Open Access policies in place in more museums worldwide, we ask ourselves – how can we build on this openness?
    How can we make our digital assets more useful?
    What do our colleagues, users and researchers really want to be able to do with images?
  • We know they want to see works at the highest level of detail…
  • …compare images, not only within collections, but between works held by different institutions…
  • …create their own online galleries for research or exhibition…


  • …and annotate images in the course of their research.
  • But most of all they want to collaborate with their peers to advance their research, and they want to do so in a seamless fashion.
  • The goals of the International Image Interoperability Framework support all of these uses.
  • With these goals in mind, I’d like to turn to the Center’s digital strategy.

    We are committed to using technology to make our collections as widely accessible as possible.

    This digital strategy is supported by

    Our Open Access policy
    Our use of data exchange standards and protocols (to support machine readable and human readable data)
    Open source tools
    Linked Open Data


  • Our collections data is available through our online catalog, where users may search collection records and view and download images.

    However, the Center also disseminates its digital resources in a programmatic fashion, which is more efficient when dealing with large data aggregators and even Yale’s own Cross-Collections Discovery service.
  • How do we do contribute to aggregators? We use community developed data standards, such as LIDO, OAI-PMH, CIDOC-CRM and RDF.

    To expose our collections dataset to service providers/data harvesters, we rely on the international XML metadata schema called LIDO and we contribute these XML files with metadata and links to images via the OAI-PMH protocol.

    The expression of data from our collection management system, TMS, via OAI-PMH is made possible through a piece of open source software, COBOAT, that was designed by CogApp for OCLC and reconfigured by our data systems manager, David Parsell, to work with LIDO.

    We also maintain a Linked Open Data semantic endpoint, with the data organized according to the CIDOC-CRM ontology, which is developed by cultural heritage community practitioners.
  • Familiarity with these data exchange standards and protocols allowed the YCBA to be the museum that contributed the most assets to the Google Art Project for example (LOWER RIGHT). We use the same process to contribute our assets to the Yale wide single search box so that researchers interested in Yale’s special collections can access them from one point.
  • As you can see by now, the IIIF framework is an extraordinarily good fit for the Center’s digital strategy.

    It is an international, shared standard
    supports interoperability between image repositories,
    leverages open source software and open access resources
    and utilizes the principles of linked open data

    With this in mind, what use has the Center made of IIIF so far?

  • The Yale Digital Collections Center, now part of Yale Information Technology Services, established a IIIF compliant image server, and, in 2013, modified an extension to our Digital Asset Management System to allow us to encode and deliver JPEG2000 images.
  • We subsequently implemented the open source IIPMooViewer for use in our online collection, and enabled hi-res zoom on a group of nearly 17,000 images in May 2013.

  • Today, we make over 47,000 IIIF compliant images freely available and we are planning on offering a drag and drop functionality from our online collections catalog into Mirador.
  • We have recently started importing more metadata from our collections catalog into Mirador for the convenience of researchers (same order as our online collections catalog for consistency). We currently make available the tombstone information, inscriptions and bibliography. In the near future we plan on releasing provenance and exhibition information so that researchers can have all the info they need in Mirador. We also plan on bringing in image technical metadata, such as a the date of creation and type of the original image so that researchers can keep track of when the images they work with were taken.
  • In addition, we have an active research project at the Center where, according to Edward Town, Postdoctoral Research Associate, and Jessica David, Associate Paintings Conservator, we see the potential for IIIF and image viewing software like Mirador to play a decisive role in helping solve key research questions.

    This in-depth cataloguing project comes off the back of “Making Art in Tudor Britain,” a project at the National Portrait Gallery in London, and intends to ascertain the attribution of the Center’s collection of Tudor panel paintings.

    Unfortunately attempts to attribute works from this period are often frustrated by the fact that artists of this period rarely signed their work, and there is very little documentary evidence about the paintings.

    This means that close examination of the objects themselves takes on an even greater significance.
  • A great deal of what Jessica and Ed do involves the collection, organisation and comparison of visual material: from old and new photographs of paintings, to x-rays, infrared reflectograms, and photomicrographs of paint samples.

    Since Ed and Jessica rarely have the opportunity to see the particular portraits being studied side-by-side, the storage, sharing and annotation of the visual documentation is vital to their research process.

  • Our Portrait of Unknown Woman from 1567, is a typical example.

    In order to establish the Center’s portrait among a group of similar works that could be associated to a specific painter or workshop, Jessica and Ed study how other similar portraits are constructed.
  • It is their conjecture that the Center’s portrait and the two other portraits shown here (NPG and private collection) originate from the same artist’s workshop, but this argument requires extensive illustration.

    Ideally, they envision being able to place their visual research and annotations into Mirador’s shared workspace where colleagues could
    - review and comment on their work,
    - have access to the original image files,
    - overlay and compare images at scale,
    - and add additional images to the workspace as they become available.
  • The Center anticipates that working with images and data in Mirador, as it develops, will facilitate the discovery of relationships between paintings, and facilitate their collaboration with other researchers.


  • Clearly adopting IIIF as an institutional standard helps us fulfill our mission in research, education and general creativity.

    Through this very brief overview I hope I gave you a sense of how the YCBA is trying to use community developed standards and tools to stimulate creative and scholarly reuse of its images and data to in turn support scholarship and we are excited to use IIIF and the Mirador viewer and help develop it further.
  • Please contact my colleagues or me if you have any questions about our work. Thanks for your time.
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